In Case You Missed It

CNN Money Jill Disis

Debate chief: Let the candidates fact-check each other

"'I don't think it's a good idea to get the moderator into essentially serving as the Encyclopedia Britannica,' Brown said Sunday on 'Reliable Sources.'"

Los Angeles Times Meredith Blake

Jane Pauley will be the next host of CBS Sunday Morning

"The move was announced at the end of Osgood’s final appearance as host of the program he took over 22 years ago."

The New York Times LAURA M. HOLSON

Angelina Jolie lawyer to the press: "I don't talk to the press"

"I do not talk to the press. Even Harvey. I’ll talk about me. I’ll talk about my clothes. But I don’t talk about my clients."

The New York Times Nicholas Kristof

Nicholas Kristof: How should journalists cover Trump?

"If a known con artist peddles a potion that he claims will make people lose 25 pounds and enjoy a better sex life, we don’t just quote the man and a critic; we find ways to signal to readers that he’s a fraud. Why should it be different when the con man runs for president?"

The New York Times Liz Spayd

NYT public editor calls for an end to substantial "stealth edits"

"The Times may not be prepared to take on these next-generation issues, but a more robust update policy would be an impressive move toward that goal."

The Washington Post Matea Gold and Anu Narayanswamy

CNN commentator Corey Lewandowski is gettting $500,000 from Trump

"Campaign officials said he will continue receiving his $20,000 monthly pay as severance until the end of the year, which would give him a total of $495,000 over two years."

The New York Times Editorial Board

New York Times endorses Hillary Clinton

"Our endorsement is rooted in respect for her intellect, experience and courage."

U.S. News and World Report Alexios Mantzarlis

Opinion: Debate moderators have a responsibility to fact-check

"The argument that the candidates, rather than the moderator, should fact-check a presidential debate, is naive, if not outright absurd."

The New York Times Sydney Ember

Jim VandeHei will launch a Snapchat channel to cover the rest of the election

"...VandeHei will provide editorial guidance for the channel, while NowThis, which already has its own Snapchat channel, will create the content."

The Washington Post Callum Borchers

Another conservative newspaper editorial board just endorsed Hillary Clinton

"...This is not a traditional race, and these are not traditional times."

The Washington Post Paul Farhi

Dear readers: Please stop calling us "the media."

"Yes, in some sense, we are the media. But not in the blunt way you use the phrase. It’s so imprecise and generic that it has lost any meaning."

Traffic Magazine Ryan Chittum

"Mo pageviews, mo problems"

This is the inaugural feature from Traffic, a new magazine devoted to data, media, and money.

Mediaite J.D. Durkin

Gary Johnson sticks his tongue out at reporter

“I’m not gonna stand up there for the whole debate and not say anything and [incomprehensible].”

The Washington Post Callum Borchers

To fact-check or not to fact-check? That is the moderator's question.

"When a candidate says something that is misleading, or flat-out wrong, should the moderator jump in with context and a correction? Or is the role of a moderator simply to ask questions, break up squabbles and keep the time?"

CNN Money Dylan Byers

Lester Holt takes the spotlight as moderator of first debate

"It is an immense responsibility, and opportunity, for a man who once seemed destined to spend his career as NBC's quiet journeyman, working in the shadow of Brian Williams with no guarantee of his own time in the spotlight."

In case you missed it

CNN Money Jill Disis

Debate chief: Let the candidates fact-check each other

"'I don't think it's a good idea to get the moderator into essentially serving as the Encyclopedia Britannica,' Brown said Sunday on 'Reliable Sources.'"

Los Angeles Times Meredith Blake

Jane Pauley will be the next host of CBS Sunday Morning

"The move was announced at the end of Osgood’s final appearance as host of the program he took over 22 years ago."

The New York Times LAURA M. HOLSON

Angelina Jolie lawyer to the press: "I don't talk to the press"

"I do not talk to the press. Even Harvey. I’ll talk about me. I’ll talk about my clothes. But I don’t talk about my clients."

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Where to find story ideas in annual reports

If you are planning on writing about business, you will need financial information about the companies you are covering. Public companies file a 10-K, an annual overview of a company's business and financial condition. It contains extensive background and financial information, including audited financial statements. It is also one of the most difficult documents to read. (Don't confuse the 10-K with the annual report, a glossy document released by the company to shareholders.)

Here are some places in the 10-K to find story ideas:

  • Management discussion. Examine this carefully. You can find information about products, divisions, acquisitions and divestitures, and restructurings during the past fiscal year.
  • Management changes. Under management discussion, the company will list the members of the management team. Pay attention to how long the various executives have been at the firm (high turnover can indicate a problem) and their career experience. How long have they been running this company or a similar business in the same industry?
  • Annual audit. Toward the back of every company's 10-K form, you will find an annual financial statement comparing the most recent year's financial statements to the previous year's. The financial statements are audited—they have been prepared and reviewed by a certified public accountant according to the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles or GAAP.
  • The auditors. CPAs are hired by the company and paid by the company. This is an accepted practice, but it raises an inherent conflict of interest. See if the company recently changed auditors. If there has been a change in the audit firm, find out why. There is almost always a reason, and it generally has little to do with the fees charged by the firm. Sometimes, companies have a disagreement about accounting policies, and the accounting firm decides to resign. Keep in mind that a review by an accounting firm only means that the firm reviewed whatever records were provided by the company. It does not mean that every book, every record or every transaction was reviewed. So, if a company is deliberately trying to fool the accountants, the accountants are probably not to blame if fraud wasn't uncovered.
  • The opinion of the accountants. Note whether the company got a "clean" or a "qualified" opinion by the accountants as part of the audit. If the audit is free of errors, the accountants will state this fact. If not, the accountants will state what problems they found and issue a qualified opinion.

Taken from Financial Literacy Basics: Producing Better Business Stories, a self-directed course by Mark Tatge at Poynter NewsU.

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