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In Case You Missed It

Albuquerque Journal Matthew Reisen

TV news crew’s truck stolen

"Someone stole a television news station’s SUV in Downtown Albuquerque while the crew was gathering footage for a story about crime in the area."

The Lenfest Institute Uncredited

Lenfest steps down as chairman of his Institute

"H.F. (Gerry) Lenfest, founder and chief funder of the year-old institute for journalism in Philadelphia that bears his name, is stepping down as chair of its board of managers. He will take the title of chairman emeritus and be succeeded by David Boardman, dean of the Lew Klein School of Media and Communications at Temple University. Lenfest gave the institute his ownership share in the Philadelphia Media Network and an initial $20 million in funding last year.  The institution has since raised $26.5 million more, and Lenfest has pledged a match of $40 million to encourage more gifts."

Nieman Lab Laura Hazard Owen

Class is still a taboo topic in the U.S. The Guardian’s ambitious new rural reporting projects are tackling it

"We want to support people who actually live in these places reporting on their own states, about inequality, and then we want to bring them to traditional elite audiences."

Bloomberg Lucas Shaw

Fox Sports cuts web writing staff to invest more in online video

"Fox Sports will eliminate about 20 writing and editing positions in Los Angeles and replace them with a similar number of jobs in video production, editing and promotion."

TechCrunch Catherine Shu

OMG Digital, the 'BuzzFeed of Africa,' raises a seed round of $1.1 million

"Its main site, OMG Voice, already has versions for Ghana, Nigeria, and Kenya, and the new capital will be used to expand into more countries."

Al Jazeera Open Letter

Al Jazeera responds to a Saudi-led bloc's attempt to shut down its global media operations

"The attempt to silence Al Jazeera is an attempt to silence independent journalism in the region, and to challenge everyone's freedom to be heard and to be informed. This must not be allowed to happen."

City, University of London Ed Grover

UK and US media must recognise differences between nations in Middle East, argues new book

"Journalists from the UK and US must do more to recognise the diversity between nations in the Middle East, according to a new book edited by Dr Zahera Harb."

Marie Claire Kayla Webley Adler

"I was fired for being pro-choice": Conservative commentator Tomi Lahren tells her story

"But after an appearance on The View in March, the criticism came from an unlikely source: her employer. At issue was Lahren's stance on abortion: 'I'm pro-choice and here's why,' she said."

Bustle Clarissa-Jan Lim

The politics (and profits) of letting Trump supporters lie on television

"The relationship between the press and the president is adversarial by nature, but under President Trump, it has become distinctly hostile, if not worse."

The Washington Post Margaret Sullivan

Trump won, and Amy Siskind started a list of changes. Now it’s a sensation.

"Soon afterward, Siskind began keeping what she calls the Weekly List, tracking all the ways in which she saw America’s taken-for-granted governmental norms changing in the Trump era."

Wall Street Journal Joe Flint and Deepa Seetharaman

Facebook is going Hollywood, seeking scripted TV programming

"The social-networking giant is talking to Hollywood studios and agencies about producing TV-quality shows with an eye toward launching original programming by late summer, people familiar with the matter said."

The New York Times Adam Goldman

C.I.A. set up secret back channel with Syria to try to free U.S. hostage

"In the early days of the Trump administration, national security officials began exploring ways to free Austin Tice, an American journalist and a former Marine officer believed to be held by the Syrian government."

The New Yorker Jeffrey Toobin

The National Enquirer's Fervor for Trump

"Throughout the 2016 Presidential race, the Enquirer embraced Trump with sycophantic fervor. The magazine made its first political endorsement ever, of Trump, last spring."

Digiday Brian Morrissey

News UK’s David Dinsmore: ‘Advertising is quite challenging’

"News UK is home to major British newspapers including The Sun, The Times of London and The Sunday Times. It’s found that among some of its key publications, the print audience is growing but advertising is falling."

Digiday Max Willens

It’s Jen Wong’s Time

"Time Inc.’s chief operating officer has yet to show up for a scheduled interview at the company’s lower Manhattan headquarters in Brookfield Place. The question of the hour: How is she helping to turn around the embattled publishing company?"

In case you missed it

Albuquerque Journal Matthew Reisen

TV news crew’s truck stolen

"Someone stole a television news station’s SUV in Downtown Albuquerque while the crew was gathering footage for a story about crime in the area."

The Lenfest Institute Uncredited

Lenfest steps down as chairman of his Institute

"H.F. (Gerry) Lenfest, founder and chief funder of the year-old institute for journalism in Philadelphia that bears his name, is stepping down as chair of its board of managers. He will take the title of chairman emeritus and be succeeded by David Boardman, dean of the Lew Klein School of Media and Communications at Temple University. Lenfest gave the institute his ownership share in the Philadelphia Media Network and an initial $20 million in funding last year.  The institution has since raised $26.5 million more, and Lenfest has pledged a match of $40 million to encourage more gifts."

Nieman Lab Laura Hazard Owen

Class is still a taboo topic in the U.S. The Guardian’s ambitious new rural reporting projects are tackling it

"We want to support people who actually live in these places reporting on their own states, about inequality, and then we want to bring them to traditional elite audiences."

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8 headline tips to draw readers on social media

Stories fill social media platforms in a continuous stream, so drawing readers to your work gets more difficult every day. Cutting through the social noise starts with sharper headlines that resonate with audiences. Here are eight tips for stronger headlines on social media.

  • Explain the news: People want to stay informed and learn information they can use.
  • Pick strong verbs: Headlines need action, so choose vivid verbs.
  • Add a number: Readers know what to expect from the story (and they like numbers).
  • Ask a question: Questions spur curiosity and engagement. But avoid obvious questions that seem like click-bait.
  • Pull the best quote: Quotes offer a nugget of information from the story--and make for clicky posts and tweets.
  • Make things recognizable: Readers won't engage if they don't know the names, places or organizations.
  • Give some urgency: Convey immediacy when news breaks. Add "breaking," "just in," "update" and so on.
  • Consider emotional reactions: People react emotionally, sometimes viscerally, to content on social media.

Taken from How to Write Sharper Social Headlines, an on-demand webinar replay with Politico's Trevor Eischen at Poynter NewsU.

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