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In Case You Missed It

HuffPost Michael Calderone

Montana TV station won’t air recording of GOP candidate’s attack on journalist

"Right-leaning Sinclair Broadcast Group recently purchased the local NBC affiliate, but the general manager says the company didn’t interfere."

The New York Times SAPNA MAHESHWARI

Hannity isn’t seeing advertisers’ exodus that O’Reilly did

"As it stands, Mr. Hannity appears to be avoiding the sort of large-scale retreat and condemnation from advertisers that contributed to the ouster of Mr. O’Reilly, as companies and even some activist groups draw a line between protesting on-air content that they may disagree with and that which violates their core values."

NBC News Uncredited

The first promo for Megyn Kelly's newsmagazine show is here

"Fresh, sharp journalism reporting the stories of our time."

Digiday Sahil Patel

Budgets for Facebook's original shows are in the $250,000 per-episode range

That "puts them in the low-end cable TV range, sources said. On the other hand, budgets for spotlight shows sit between $10,000 and $40,000 per episode, sources said."

Digiday Max Willens

How The Village Voice is reinventing the alt-weekly for digital

"The Village Voice wants to sell subscriptions. About 18 months after it changed hands, the alt weekly unveiled a new website this week that supports a broader range of digital ad units and is designed to help sell subscriptions and drive people to pickup physical copies of the paper."

The New York Times MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

A journalist was body slammed, but some conservatives want the news media to apologize

"In this time of intense partisanship, shiv-in-the-kidney politics and squabbles over the meaning of truth, can Americans come together and agree that a politician slamming a journalist to the ground for asking a question is wrong? The answer, it turns out, is no."

The New York Times SCOTT SHANE

Leaks: a uniquely American way of annoying the authorities

"The concept of a free press has been integral to the American idea since its inception. That’s not true even of other democracies. The press here even has the right to be irresponsible, which it sometimes is."

HuffPost Ed Mazza

Newspaper formally apologizes to wookiees for 40-year-old ‘Star Wars’ mistake

"Our review of the original Star Wars, which appeared in The Dallas Morning News on May 26, 1977, incorrectly referred to Chewbacca as a ‘Wookie.’"

The New York Times JONATHAN MARTIN and ALEXANDER BURNS

Greg Gianforte, Montana Republican, captures House seat despite assault charge

"Addressing the altercation for the first time late Thursday night, Mr. Gianforte apologized to the Guardian reporter, Ben Jacobs, by name, acknowledged he 'made a mistake' and vowed to the state’s voters that he would not embarrass them again."

Nieman Lab RICARDO BILTON

With its Special Projects Desk, Univision is keeping Gawker’s spirit alive at Gizmodo Media Group

"The investigative unit, now at eight people, is dedicated to covering the inner workings of our most powerful institutions."

CUNY Press release

Molly de Aguiar named managing director for News Integrity Initiative

"Molly de Aguiar, Program Director for Informed Communities at the New Jersey-based Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, will be joining NII on July 1 as its first managing director."

The Atlantic JEFF JARVIS

News organizations can't fix the trust problem by themselves

"Journalists still expect people to turn to them first to make sense of the world. They shouldn’t."

Washingtonian Andrew Beaujon

Has WAMU solved public radio’s diversity problem?

"Across town at public-radio station WAMU, though, something unusual is occurring — the number of African-American and Latino listeners is going up. If only anyone knew why."

Digiday Sahil Patel

The Atlantic is shifting its focus to YouTube because it's easier to make money there

"The 160-year-old publication, which has a small video operation compared to the distributed-media publishers that get billions of monthly views on Facebook, is focusing on creating longer videos that dive into serious topics such as science and politics."

The New York Times Jim Rutenberg

Sean Hannity, a murder and why fake news endures

"As the Seth Rich story shows, we’re going to need a bigger algorithm."

In case you missed it

HuffPost Michael Calderone

Montana TV station won’t air recording of GOP candidate’s attack on journalist

"Right-leaning Sinclair Broadcast Group recently purchased the local NBC affiliate, but the general manager says the company didn’t interfere."

The New York Times SAPNA MAHESHWARI

Hannity isn’t seeing advertisers’ exodus that O’Reilly did

"As it stands, Mr. Hannity appears to be avoiding the sort of large-scale retreat and condemnation from advertisers that contributed to the ouster of Mr. O’Reilly, as companies and even some activist groups draw a line between protesting on-air content that they may disagree with and that which violates their core values."

NBC News Uncredited

The first promo for Megyn Kelly's newsmagazine show is here

"Fresh, sharp journalism reporting the stories of our time."

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Pros (and cons) of open-ended or closed poll questions

Every poll involves a questionnaire that contains a standardized set of questions that are asked of every person. The way a question is asked can affect the answers that people give.

In an open-ended question, people answer in their own terms. In a closed-ended format, people choose from a given list of answers. (The vast majority of polling questions are closed-ended.)

One example is the “most important problem” question. This is asked most commonly in the open-ended form used by the Gallup organization: What is the most important problem facing the country today?

But some polling organizations ask the question this way: Which of the following problems is the most important one facing the country today?

This closed-ended form produces a shorter list of problems, based upon the length of the list. It may also produce other differences based upon the order in which the “problems” are listed.

Advantages and disadvantages exist in using either form. Open-ended questions are good for really getting at what is on people’s minds and having people talk about issues in their own words. On the other hand, open-ended responses can be hard to code into meaningful categories, particularly in tight time frames; they take more time to administer, so the researcher must ask fewer questions; and they can be hard to draw conclusions from if only a small number of people provide any given response.

Closed-ended questions are considerably easier to administer and analyze, but they can sometimes make people feel constrained in their answers, particularly if the categories do not include the response a person wants to provide.

Taken from Understanding and Interpreting Polls, a self-directed course at Poynter NewsU, developed in partnership with the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR).

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