In Case You Missed It

Columbia Journalism Review Anna Clark

In Flint, East Village Magazine has found new life

"And that holds true for the quiet glory of giving one’s time and talent to community journalism as well. Worth-Nelson used to go to the cluttered Second Street office on Sunday afternoons to proof her column."

Recode Peter Kafka

Yes, Facebook is a media company

"When you gather people’s attention and sell that attention to advertisers, guess what? You’re a media company. And you’re really good at it. Really, really good. Billions of dollars a quarter good."

Digiday Tanya Dua

Confessions of an ex-Facebook trending news curator

"It never seemed like anyone in the company ever actually understood what we did or understand how the topics were curated."

Digiday Lucinda Southern

The Telegraph built a tool that auto-creates graphics of Premier League goals

"We were trying to solve two problems: how to produce sports visualizations in real-time, and how to automate and save time."

The Washington Post Robert O'Harrow, Shawn Boburg, Drew Harwell, Amy Goldstein, Jerry Markon

Trump threatens additional lawsuits in Post interview

"Now, libel suits are very hard and I may look at that frankly if I get elected because it’s very unfair that somebody could write whatever they want to write and get away with it. And I will be bringing more libel suits as people — maybe against you folks."

Slate Will Oremus

How Facebook’s foray into automated news went from messy to disastrous

"...In its haste to mollify conservatives, the company appears to have rolled out a new product that members of its own trending news team viewed as seriously flawed."

Shorenstein Center Johanna Dunaway

Will mobile news accelerate the digital divide?

"Given that this disconnect falls along income, racial, ethnic, and occupational lines, the effect could be an acceleration of the divide between America’s haves and have-nots—this at a time when that divide is already a source of political concern and unrest."

Nieman Lab JOSHUA BENTON

The Washington Post open-sources its Trump reporting

"It is meant as a resource for other journalists and a trove to explore for our many readers fascinated by original documents."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

How outlets are tailoring their coverage for Alexa

"News is one of the device’s core features, and there are two main ways — so far — that outlets have utilized Alexa: The Flash Briefing and skills."

Politico Jack Shafer

Warren Hinckle, dead at 77, changed American journalism

"Hinckle mostly added footnotes to the art of journalism during the past 40 years, but during his prime, which ran from 1965 to 1975, he practiced journalism like a political insurrectionist, rushing into combat with one eye patched (from a childhood injury) and even sporting a cape on occasion."

St. Louis Post-Dispatch Editorial board

St. Louis Post-Dispatch does some soul searching

"We make no excuses for the challenges this modern business environment poses. We also will make no compromises on the basic tenets laid out by Joseph Pulitzer more than a century ago."

CNN Money Brian Stelter

Fox News fires back at Andrea Tantaros in new motion

"In the first legal response to Andrea Tantaros' lawsuit against it, Fox News says she 'is not a victim; she is an opportunist.'"

BuzzFeed Craig Silverman

A site that Facebook made a top trending topic is a sketchy reprint dactory

"EndingTheFed.com is filled with dubious articles taken from other right-wing websites."

The Hollywood Reporter Tobias Burns

Andrea Tantaros' lawyer issues lie-detector challenge to Fox News

"Tantaros' lawyer sent out a document to reporters this morning with a schedule of questions for Ailes, Fox News host Bill O'Reilly, Fox News spokesperson Irena Briganti, network co-president Bill Shine and vice president Dianna Brandi."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

AP chief on patently false Clinton tweet: No regrets!

From The Post's media blogger and opinionator: "There can be no dispute about the tweet. It is wrong, prima facie wrong. Clearly wrong. Patently wrong. Simply wrong."

In case you missed it

Columbia Journalism Review Anna Clark

In Flint, East Village Magazine has found new life

"And that holds true for the quiet glory of giving one’s time and talent to community journalism as well. Worth-Nelson used to go to the cluttered Second Street office on Sunday afternoons to proof her column."

Recode Peter Kafka

Yes, Facebook is a media company

"When you gather people’s attention and sell that attention to advertisers, guess what? You’re a media company. And you’re really good at it. Really, really good. Billions of dollars a quarter good."

Digiday Tanya Dua

Confessions of an ex-Facebook trending news curator

"It never seemed like anyone in the company ever actually understood what we did or understand how the topics were curated."

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4 guidelines to avoid fabrication in your news coverage

Fabrication in news publishing can take many forms, from creating sources and embellishing stories to making quotes sound different from what was actually said. Here are some best practices to avoid fabrication from Geanne Belton, Ruth Hochberger and Jane Kirtley, journalists and educators who are the authors of the Poynter course on avoiding plagiarism and fabrication.

  • Be a stickler for accuracy. Develop and maintain guidelines and high standards for accuracy in the facts you report.
  • Take responsibility for every fact. Confirm every fact yourself with what you've observed, you've heard in interviews with credible sources and what you've learned in authoritative documents. Attribute the facts to your sources.
  • Stick to the facts. Avoid embellishing or exaggerating for the sake of telling a more dramatic story.
  • Be aware of the legal risks. Fabrication not only damages your career and the reputation of your organization. It can result in legal liability if your fabrication could harm someone’s reputation.

Taken from Avoiding Plagiarism and Fabrication, a self-directed course by Geanne Belton, Ruth S. Hochberger and Jane Kirtley at Poynter NewsU.

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