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In Case You Missed It

Politico Media Jack Shafer

Put on your big-boy/girl pants, journos

"President Trump’s lies don’t call for extraordinary media measures. Just do your jobs."

The New York Times Katie Benner

Snapchat Discover clamps down on misleading and explicit images

"Those kinds of risqué and misleading images will now be much less prominent on Discover because early on Monday, Snapchat updated its guidelines for publishers in a way that essentially cleans up what is shown on its news service."

Digiday Ross Benes

The global state of fake news in 5 charts

"Despite the increased coverage of fake news, surveys show that users are still overconfident in their ability to detect false stories. 'This is a global issue,” said Forrester analyst Susan Bidel. 'Fake news will be a problem wherever fake-news generators can make money.'"

Twitter Laura June

Matter Studios is kaput

"We're sad to share this news, but as of today, Matter Studios is ceasing its business operations. We are grateful for your interest and support over this [sic] last many months, and wish you the best in 2017."

The Daily Beast Marlow Stern

A prelude to President Trump’s war on the free press

"The Sundance documentary ‘Nobody Speak’ chronicles how an angry billionaire was able to take down the news site Gawker out of spite, providing a disturbing window into our future."

The New York Times Ben Smith

Why BuzzFeed published the dossier

"...We need to develop new rules that adhere to the core values of honesty and respect for our audience...Sometimes, it means publishing unverified information in a transparent way that informs our users of its provenance, its impact and why we trust or distrust it."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

Dean Baquet rips public editor's column

"When a news organization concludes that it cannot prove something, it doesn’t get to say, 'I want to show you my notebook anyway,' says Baquet."

YouTube Tucker Carlson

Tucker Carlson eviscerates hoaxter

"This is a sham. Your company isn't real. Your website is fake. The claims you have made are lies. This is a hoax."

PressThink Jay Rosen

Want to do the press briefing justice? Send the interns.

"Put your most junior people in the White House briefing room. Recognize that the real story is elsewhere, and most likely hidden."

Politico Matthew Nussbaum

Former press secretaries slam Sean Spicer

"The President I worked for never told me to lie. Ever. And I doubt Pres. Bush ever told @AriFleischer to lie. Today was not normal."

Politico Alex Weprin

The New York Times is investigating a Twitter hack

"'The account was compromised. We have deleted the tweets and are investigating the situation,' a New York Times spokesperson told POLITICO."

Monday Note Frederic Filloux

Opinion: Facebook's journalism project is a PR stunt

"Facebook had to do something for the news ecosystem. But its freedom of movement is limited by the structure of its revenue stream. Hence a project that blends cynicism and naïveté."

CNN Brian Stelter

Could this be the new White House photographer?

"Shealah Craighead is in the running to become Donald Trump's chief White House photographer."

CNN Reliable Sources Brian Stelter

White House Correspondents chief reacts to falsehood-filled briefing

"It was absolutely surprising and stunning."

The Washington Post Margaret Sullivan

R.I.P. access journalism

"(White House Press Secretary Sean) Spicer’s statement should be seen for what it is: Remarks made over the casket at the funeral of access journalism."

In case you missed it

Politico Media Jack Shafer

Put on your big-boy/girl pants, journos

"President Trump’s lies don’t call for extraordinary media measures. Just do your jobs."

The New York Times Katie Benner

Snapchat Discover clamps down on misleading and explicit images

"Those kinds of risqué and misleading images will now be much less prominent on Discover because early on Monday, Snapchat updated its guidelines for publishers in a way that essentially cleans up what is shown on its news service."

Digiday Ross Benes

The global state of fake news in 5 charts

"Despite the increased coverage of fake news, surveys show that users are still overconfident in their ability to detect false stories. 'This is a global issue,” said Forrester analyst Susan Bidel. 'Fake news will be a problem wherever fake-news generators can make money.'"

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5 tips for video interviews

Seeing, for many viewers, is believing. But to really “understand” requires explanation and context. That is a key role journalists fill. When you're interviewing a person, you want to capture more than the interview. Here are some tips for b-roll and other ways to add context to your story.

  • Capture as much video of a person as you can before the interview. The more you know, the more productive the interview will be. And the person will be more relaxed in the interview if she has spent time showing you whatever it is that makes her newsworthy.
  • Interview the main subject of your story in at least two settings. One setting is a more formal sit-down interview with a tripod-steadied shot. It is the “what” part of the story.
  • The second main interview is “off the shoulder” with the camera moving as the person is in a more relaxed setting. This setting does not include the distraction of TV lights and often elicits the most heartfelt sound bites, the emotional part of the story.
  • If you cut between these interviews and the b-roll, it gives viewers the idea that you have spent a lot of time with the the person because we experience her in more than one setting.
  • Be careful: Avoid asking people to act for the camera, unless you make it clear that you asked them to show you “how it happened.” Instead, ask the person what she would be doing if you were not there. Try to capture that. Then use exteriors of houses and office buildings to give viewers a sense of place.

Taken from Reporting, Writing for TV and the Web: Aim for the Heart, a self-directed course by Poynter's Al Tompkins at Poynter NewsU.

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