In Case You Missed It

Politico Hadas Gold

Facebook: 55 million viewed debate-related videos

"It's not clear for how long people would watch the videos, but the high number adds to the expectation that more than 80 million people will have watched the debate on television."

Digiday Jessica Davies

How The New York Times is expanding abroad

"Clearly, events such as the forthcoming U.S. election will make the NYT, and other U.S. media, more relevant to more people, but on an ongoing basis, its appeal and necessity will be relatively niche."

The Huffington Post Michael Calderone

Lester Holt proved debate moderators can fact-check

"While Trump may not want to accept the facts, Holt deserves credit for pointing them out."

The New York Times MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

So, how'd Lester Holt do?

"On Monday, Mr. Holt, like a referee at a prizefight, stepped in only when necessary. The result, for the moderator, was a split decision."

BuzzFeed Stephanie McNeal

Reporter's slur goes viral before debate

Kimberly Halkett, a reporter for Al Jazeera English, said "Thanks a lot, bitch," to someone trying to push past her.

Nieman Reports GABE BULLARD

Crowdfunding's impact on journalism is still minimal

"Crowdfunding's financial contribution to journalism is still meager, but journalists are finding that crowdfunding can bring what Google and Facebook so often take away: the crowd and the funding."

Columbia Journalism Review Emily Bell

Facebook is looking increasingly like a publisher

"Like the BBC, which also started out with an engineering mission, Facebook cannot see publishing decisions—whoever takes them—made on its platform as separate from its corporate health and reputation."

Ad Age Jeremy Barr

Time Inc. creating 'digital desks' and magazine hubs

The topics include business, celebrity, entertainment, food and sports.

Dayton Daily News Staff report

Kim Guthrie is president of Cox Media Group

"Guthrie joined the company in 1998 and currently serves as Cox Media Group’s executive vice president of national ad platforms and president of Cox Reps, the country’s largest television advertising rep firm."

The Wall Street Journal MIKE SHIELDS

A rebuke to the distributed media trend

"With Inverse, the plan is to focus on quality content and build a direct relationship with readers and advertisers on its own site, said Mr. Nemetz."

Politico KELSEY SUTTON

Bloomberg TV to fact check debate on-screen

"The channel’s decision to conduct an on-screen fact-check sets Bloomberg apart from the other major TV networks, none of whom have committed to doing on-screen fact checks during the debate."

Recode PETER KAFKA

The New York Times is backing TheSkimm

"The Times is part of a group of investors putting a total of $500,000 into the New York-based startup."

Ad Age Jeremy Barr

Business Insider is testing a paywall

"These selected users will see the subscription message three times, at the beginning of the test, at the mid-point of their free story allotment, and with one story remaining."

Politico Joe Pompeo

New startup will offer cannabis coverage

"The Fresh Toast has been quietly publishing in beta in recent weeks ahead of an official October 4 launch that McKay says will deliver a weed publication targeting the non-stoner set."

Politico Ken Doctor

Meet Fresco, the video-crowd-sourcing startup

"Tronc’s effort to buy Fresco seems unlikely to succeed, as this hot company – several sources tell me – finds itself well-courted by more stable buyers."

In case you missed it

Politico Hadas Gold

Facebook: 55 million viewed debate-related videos

"It's not clear for how long people would watch the videos, but the high number adds to the expectation that more than 80 million people will have watched the debate on television."

Digiday Jessica Davies

How The New York Times is expanding abroad

"Clearly, events such as the forthcoming U.S. election will make the NYT, and other U.S. media, more relevant to more people, but on an ongoing basis, its appeal and necessity will be relatively niche."

The Huffington Post Michael Calderone

Lester Holt proved debate moderators can fact-check

"While Trump may not want to accept the facts, Holt deserves credit for pointing them out."

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