In Case You Missed It

Variety David Remnick

David Remnick is high on BuzzFeed

The New Yorker editor praised BuzzFeed's lofty ambitions. "(Editor-in-Chief Ben) Smith landed at BuzzFeed; more to the point, he was instrumental in inventing it — a protean site that is morphing all the time."

Politico Hadas Gold and Alex Weprin

Cable news’ election-year haul could reach $2.5 billion

"Despite the massive 2016 haul, the picture for television news continues to be bleak. For one thing, news networks these days are making less than half their money from advertising, so 'big years' don't have nearly the lasting effect they might otherwise."

Politico Hadas Gold

Facebook: 55 million viewed debate-related videos

"It's not clear for how long people would watch the videos, but the high number adds to the expectation that more than 80 million people will have watched the debate on television."

Digiday Jessica Davies

How The New York Times is expanding abroad

"Clearly, events such as the forthcoming U.S. election will make the NYT, and other U.S. media, more relevant to more people, but on an ongoing basis, its appeal and necessity will be relatively niche."

The Huffington Post Michael Calderone

Lester Holt proved debate moderators can fact-check

"While Trump may not want to accept the facts, Holt deserves credit for pointing them out."

The New York Times MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

So, how'd Lester Holt do?

"On Monday, Mr. Holt, like a referee at a prizefight, stepped in only when necessary. The result, for the moderator, was a split decision."

BuzzFeed Stephanie McNeal

Reporter's slur goes viral before debate

Kimberly Halkett, a reporter for Al Jazeera English, said "Thanks a lot, bitch," to someone trying to push past her.

Nieman Reports GABE BULLARD

Crowdfunding's impact on journalism is still minimal

"Crowdfunding's financial contribution to journalism is still meager, but journalists are finding that crowdfunding can bring what Google and Facebook so often take away: the crowd and the funding."

Columbia Journalism Review Emily Bell

Facebook is looking increasingly like a publisher

"Like the BBC, which also started out with an engineering mission, Facebook cannot see publishing decisions—whoever takes them—made on its platform as separate from its corporate health and reputation."

Ad Age Jeremy Barr

Time Inc. creating 'digital desks' and magazine hubs

The topics include business, celebrity, entertainment, food and sports.

Dayton Daily News Staff report

Kim Guthrie is president of Cox Media Group

"Guthrie joined the company in 1998 and currently serves as Cox Media Group’s executive vice president of national ad platforms and president of Cox Reps, the country’s largest television advertising rep firm."

The Wall Street Journal MIKE SHIELDS

A rebuke to the distributed media trend

"With Inverse, the plan is to focus on quality content and build a direct relationship with readers and advertisers on its own site, said Mr. Nemetz."

Politico KELSEY SUTTON

Bloomberg TV to fact check debate on-screen

"The channel’s decision to conduct an on-screen fact-check sets Bloomberg apart from the other major TV networks, none of whom have committed to doing on-screen fact checks during the debate."

Recode PETER KAFKA

The New York Times is backing TheSkimm

"The Times is part of a group of investors putting a total of $500,000 into the New York-based startup."

Ad Age Jeremy Barr

Business Insider is testing a paywall

"These selected users will see the subscription message three times, at the beginning of the test, at the mid-point of their free story allotment, and with one story remaining."

In case you missed it

Variety David Remnick

David Remnick is high on BuzzFeed

The New Yorker editor praised BuzzFeed's lofty ambitions. "(Editor-in-Chief Ben) Smith landed at BuzzFeed; more to the point, he was instrumental in inventing it — a protean site that is morphing all the time."

Politico Hadas Gold and Alex Weprin

Cable news’ election-year haul could reach $2.5 billion

"Despite the massive 2016 haul, the picture for television news continues to be bleak. For one thing, news networks these days are making less than half their money from advertising, so 'big years' don't have nearly the lasting effect they might otherwise."

Politico Hadas Gold

Facebook: 55 million viewed debate-related videos

"It's not clear for how long people would watch the videos, but the high number adds to the expectation that more than 80 million people will have watched the debate on television."

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How to write a clear fact-check

Fact-checkers often have to check statements that are confusing, unsupported and unclear. The fact-check addressing it should be the opposite. Focus on writing that offers context, clarity and transparency.

Context

Start by providing context to the claim you're checking. Where and when was it said? To whom? Is there a history of repetition? Is there a pronoun or reference that isn't immediately clear?

Clarity

If you use technical jargon, don't presume that readers will know what it means. At the same time, try not to overload text with definitions. Provide a succinct explanation and link to web pages that provide more detail. A regular format that includes labels can help guide readers through complicated explanations. It also can help keep the writing focused and a reasonable length.

Transparency

What resources, documents, spreadsheets and interviews were used in compiling the fact-check? Gather them all together and share them with your readers, through links, info boxes or charts. To increase trust and credibility, provide the audience with access to those resources whenever possible. Other ways to make fact-checking "bulletproof" include:

  • Explaining which data is available on the statements you are fact-checking
  • Explaining why a particular statement is being fact-checked
  • Telling the audience what they should they know about the sources and why each source was selected
  • Leaving all opinions out of the fact-check.

Taken from Fact-checking: How to Improve Your Skills in Accountability Journalism, a self-directed course by Alexios Mantzarlis and Jane Elizabeth at Poynter NewsU.

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