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In Case You Missed It

The Washington Post Sean Spicer

Sean Spicer on Politico reporter: "An idiot with no real sources"

"Breitbart asked about that bit of reporting, and Spicer responded with his elegant take on (Tara) Palmeri’s character."

The Washington Post Margaret Sullivan

Scott Pelley is pulling no punches on the nightly news — and people are taking notice

"Far more than his competitors — Lester Holt on NBC and David Muir on ABC — Pelley is using words and approaches that pull no punches."

The New York Times Sapna Maheshwari

Brands try to blacklist Breitbart, but ads slip through anyway

"The problem underscores the challenges companies continue to face with the largely automated nature of online advertising, which tends to show messages to people based on who they are, rather than what site they visit."

The Daily Emerald Andrew Field

Pulitzer prize-winning J-School professor Alex Tizon has died

"Scott Maier, journalism director at the school, said in an email to students that Tizon died in his sleep."

"CBS This Morning" Ted Koppel

Ted Koppel tells Sean Hannity he's bad for America

"You have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts."

Overseas Press Club Patricia Kranz

Here are the winners of the Overseas Press Club awards

"The New York Times and PBS-TV led all media outlets with three OPC awards each. The Times swept all three photo categories, including the prestigious Robert Capa Gold Medal for photography requiring exceptional courage as Bryan Denton and Sergey Ponomarev captured compelling images in Islamic State-occupied territories."

FiveThirtyEight Walt Hickey

A mistranslated word led The New York Times to report evidence of life on Mars

"A translation error is pretty much responsible for a generation of science fiction (which was initially published directly in the mainstream press as science fact)."

The Huffington Post Michael Calderone

Pro-Trump media get their wish as health care bill is pulled

"And Speaker Paul Ryan gets all the blame."

Al Jazeera America Teresa Schmedding, Kevin Leung, Martin Conboy and James Alan Anslow

The art and evolution of headline writing

"How have headlines evolved, from their early days in the late 19th century to their bold modern digital descendants?"

Press Gazette Dominic Ponsford

Rafat Ali regrets selling PaidContent

"The main lesson is never sell. I sold in a hurry and got seduced by The Guardian as an editorial brand, I should have done more due diligence on their history of supporting other companies and their history of the business side being in sync with the editorial side."

The New Yorker Alexandra Schwartz

My life as Bob Silvers' assistant

"When he didn’t have a lunch or dinner obligation, he ate at his desk, which, like his papers and his clothes, was covered with the mysterious remnants of meals haphazardly consumed in the line of duty."

Politico HADAS GOLD

Russia's state news service applies for White House pass

"Sputnik, which Foreign Policy magazine described as the 'BuzzFeed of propaganda,' would be part of a rotating group of roughly 22 overseas outlets following President Donald Trump in his everyday interactions along with pool reporters from American print, TV, and radio outlets."

Nashville Scene CARI WADE GERVIN

Did legislators get a public radio reporter fired?

"It’s total blackmail. And it’s a complete conflict of interest."

The New York Times MAGGIE HABERMAN

Boris Epshteyn, Trump TV surrogate, is leaving White House job

"Boris Epshteyn, an official in the White House press office who had a contentious relationship with television producers and was once a frequent presence on TV himself, is leaving his job, according to three people with knowledge of the move."

The New York Times JOHN KOBLIN and NICK CORASANITI

One nation, under Fox: 18 hours with a network that shapes America

"We watched Fox News from 6 a.m. until midnight on Thursday to see how its coverage varied from that of its rivals on a day when cable news was dominated by the health care debate in Congress, the terrorist attack in London and the investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election."

In case you missed it

The Washington Post Sean Spicer

Sean Spicer on Politico reporter: "An idiot with no real sources"

"Breitbart asked about that bit of reporting, and Spicer responded with his elegant take on (Tara) Palmeri’s character."

The Washington Post Margaret Sullivan

Scott Pelley is pulling no punches on the nightly news — and people are taking notice

"Far more than his competitors — Lester Holt on NBC and David Muir on ABC — Pelley is using words and approaches that pull no punches."

The New York Times Sapna Maheshwari

Brands try to blacklist Breitbart, but ads slip through anyway

"The problem underscores the challenges companies continue to face with the largely automated nature of online advertising, which tends to show messages to people based on who they are, rather than what site they visit."

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5 motivators to engage your viewers

The lead of your story has to speak to what motivates viewers to sit and watch. Here are five motivators for engaging viewers with a news story on TV or the web:

  • Money
  • Family
  • Safety
  • Health
  • Community

You can address the “safety” motivator in crime stories, in stories about unsafe cars or in stories about texting or talking on the phone while driving. The “community” motivator might be a story about crumbling neighborhoods, the rise of social networks and the push for neighborhood schools.

As you craft your lead, and the entire story, write to one (or, even better, more than one) of those motivators. For example, a city council meeting about a tax increase is clearly about money. But if the tax increase is going to pay for more police officers, it might be a story about safety.

Taken from Five Motivators to Engage Viewers, a video tutorial by Poynter's Al Tompkins at Poynter NewsU.

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