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In Case You Missed It

The Wall Street Journal Lukas I. Alpert

The Ringer is leaving Medium for Vox Media, but will retain its editorial independence

"Revenue from ad sales to be split between the two companies."

BuzzFeed Craig Silverman and Sara Spary

Trolls are targeting Indian restaurants with a create-your-own fake news site

"At least 30 websites invite people to make up a fake news story and share it on Facebook. Over the past 12 months the articles have generated more than 13 million engagements on the social network."

Politico NATASHA KORECKI

Tronc plan to buy Sun-Times may face competition

"David Roeder, a consultant with the Chicago News Guild, which represents the newsrooms of the Sun-Times and the Chicago Reader, said that at least two other interested groups of buyers have reached out to the guild and expressed an interest in buying the news organization."

The New York Times JACQUELINE WILLIAMS

Australia’s real estate boom has Wall Street wooing a newspaper publisher

"Two large American private equity firms, TPG Capital and Hellman & Friedman, are bidding to buy Fairfax, valuing the company at nearly $3 billion."

HuffPost Michael Calderone

Kentucky newspaper’s windows shattered amid rising anti-press climate

"Police believe someone may have fired a gun at the building."

Digiday Max Willens

The New York Times has amassed 13 million subscribers to 50 email newsletters

"According to the Times memo, that growth matters because newsletter subscribers are twice as likely as regular New York Times readers to become subscribers, the primary area of focus for the publisher. (They also read twice as many stories per month as the average Times reader.)"

The New York Times Daniel Victor

An obituary for Frank Deford

“Frank Deford with a pen in his hand is like Michael Jordan with a basketball and Tiger Woods with a driver.”

Business Insider PAUL COLGAN

BuzzFeed CEO says dossier lawsuit is attempt to hush up media

"The lawsuit, filed last Friday, was an 'an outrageous attempt to try to silence the American media,' Peretti told Business Insider Australia in an interview."

The Ringer Bryan Curtis

What Frank Deford meant to sportswriting

"Deford wrote so well it obscured his divining-rod abilities as a reporter."

Politico NICHOLAS VINOCUR

Macron, standing by Putin, calls RT and Sputnik ‘agents of influence’

"Macron said the two media organizations 'did not behave like press outlets, but behaved like agents of influence and propaganda' which spread 'serious falsehoods,' Macron said. 'I will never give in to that.'"

KOB Kenneth Mahan

Man arrested as he tries to break into New Mexico newsroom

"The Albuquerque Police Department arrived at the station and took the man into custody."

The New York Times MAGGIE HABERMAN, GLENN THRUSH and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

The White House is considering a new communications strategy

"Under the evolving scenario, Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary, would take a diminished public role, with daily on-camera briefings replaced by more limited interactions with journalists..."

The Guardian David Dennis

Unpaid internships and a culture of privilege are ruining journalism

"Media companies that rely on unpaid interns marginalize the voices of low-income communities and minorities."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

You can now get a few additional features on Nuzzel for $100 a year

"The news aggregator this week launched Nuzzel Pro, which is ad-free, lets users filter stories, and use a dark mode."

In case you missed it

The Wall Street Journal Lukas I. Alpert

The Ringer is leaving Medium for Vox Media, but will retain its editorial independence

"Revenue from ad sales to be split between the two companies."

BuzzFeed Craig Silverman and Sara Spary

Trolls are targeting Indian restaurants with a create-your-own fake news site

"At least 30 websites invite people to make up a fake news story and share it on Facebook. Over the past 12 months the articles have generated more than 13 million engagements on the social network."

Politico NATASHA KORECKI

Tronc plan to buy Sun-Times may face competition

"David Roeder, a consultant with the Chicago News Guild, which represents the newsrooms of the Sun-Times and the Chicago Reader, said that at least two other interested groups of buyers have reached out to the guild and expressed an interest in buying the news organization."

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Pros (and cons) of open-ended or closed poll questions

Every poll involves a questionnaire that contains a standardized set of questions that are asked of every person. The way a question is asked can affect the answers that people give.

In an open-ended question, people answer in their own terms. In a closed-ended format, people choose from a given list of answers. (The vast majority of polling questions are closed-ended.)

One example is the “most important problem” question. This is asked most commonly in the open-ended form used by the Gallup organization: What is the most important problem facing the country today?

But some polling organizations ask the question this way: Which of the following problems is the most important one facing the country today?

This closed-ended form produces a shorter list of problems, based upon the length of the list. It may also produce other differences based upon the order in which the “problems” are listed.

Advantages and disadvantages exist in using either form. Open-ended questions are good for really getting at what is on people’s minds and having people talk about issues in their own words. On the other hand, open-ended responses can be hard to code into meaningful categories, particularly in tight time frames; they take more time to administer, so the researcher must ask fewer questions; and they can be hard to draw conclusions from if only a small number of people provide any given response.

Closed-ended questions are considerably easier to administer and analyze, but they can sometimes make people feel constrained in their answers, particularly if the categories do not include the response a person wants to provide.

Taken from Understanding and Interpreting Polls, a self-directed course at Poynter NewsU, developed in partnership with the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR).

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