In Case You Missed It

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

Roger Ailes promotes upcoming exposé on Roger Ailes

"Mukasey told Grove that 'nobody reads New York magazine.' That, of course, is not true, especially after all this fabulous promotion."

Nieman Lab Shan Wang

Inside the cartoon journalism renaissance

Come for the story. Stay for the cartoons.

Politico Hadas Gold

In Mexico, Trump will leave the media behind

"...While there is a charter plane for the press traveling with Trump, their plane was directed to Phoenix where Trump will later give an immigration speech."

Columbia Journalism Review Yardena Schwartz

Here's how Vice treats its freelancers (not well)

"Interviews with more than a dozen freelance journalists suggest the young, edgy news organization heralded as the future of journalism also has ushered in a new low for its treatment of freelance journalists."

Washingtonian Andrew Beaujon

Washingtonian: It's kind of nuts that Obama wants credit for transparency

"While we’re at it, let’s not forget the off-the-record meetings with journalists (“We don’t provide lists of participants”), the embargoes, that time the government secretly got Associated Press phone records. The Obama administration even made it harder to get White House photos."

The New York Times STEVEN DAVIDOFF SOLOMON

What Tronc risks by spurning Gannett

"The risk in this strategy is that Gannett goes away instead of acquiring Tronc, leaving the company to wither like Yahoo or find its own path to success."

The Wall Street Journal SHALINI RAMACHANDRAN

Twitter taps baseball’s tech unit for live-streaming

"The deal, according to people familiar with the matter, assures Twitter that it will have the help of a seasoned streaming outfit to help it air 10 NFL Thursday Night Football games worldwide this season."

Columbia Journalism Review David Uberti

Wanted: One journalist to write, edit, lay out and deliver a newspaper

"'As the editor/reporter,' the listing for her job explained, 'you will be responsible for writing every story, laying out every issue, sending it to the printers and picking it up in Whitehorse, [Yukon Territory], two hours away.'"

National Review David French

National Review contributor: Fox News hurts the conservative movement

"It’s hard to overstate the power of Fox News for those seeking a career in the conservative movement. I’ve seen the most accomplished of lawyers suddenly become “somebody” only after they regularly appear on Fox."

The Atlantic CONOR FRIEDERSDORF

Rush Limbaugh's ultimate betrayal of his audience

"The talk-radio host claims that he never took Donald Trump seriously on immigration. He neglected to tell his immigration obsessed listeners."

The Media Briefing Peter Houston

Why micropayments won’t save journalism

"A system of micropayments that monetizes at least part of this drive-by audience has to be worth pursuing, but it would be a mistake for publishers to reduce their primary product to a single unit of content."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

One of Arianna Huffington's legacies at HuffPost: Conflicts of interest

"...As the 66-year-old Huffington prepares to leave the Huffington Post...some of her fellow journalists will not miss the pressures that came with her leadership of the Huffington Post — pressures related to her high-profile friends and luminaries."

Digiday Jemma Brackebush

Three years in, Fusion starts to find its footing

"Millennial publisher Fusion has more than doubled its digital audience in the past year to 11.5 million unique viewers, but that number is still tiny in comparison to competitors including BuzzFeed, Vice, Vox and Mic."

Digiday Jessica Davies

How The Independent is expanding internationally

"Like all publishers, it’s trying to assess the balance of using Facebook to gain global reach against the monetization trade-off. And Instant Articles ad yields are eroding fast."

Politico Jack Shafer

Opinion: Journalists should feel free to speculate about Clinton and Trump's health

"To play devil’s advocate for a moment, voters and journalists have every right—almost a duty!—to reject the official health summaries provided by candidates and to speculate, especially when the candidates are as old as Trump and Clinton."

In case you missed it

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

Roger Ailes promotes upcoming exposé on Roger Ailes

"Mukasey told Grove that 'nobody reads New York magazine.' That, of course, is not true, especially after all this fabulous promotion."

Nieman Lab Shan Wang

Inside the cartoon journalism renaissance

Come for the story. Stay for the cartoons.

Politico Hadas Gold

In Mexico, Trump will leave the media behind

"...While there is a charter plane for the press traveling with Trump, their plane was directed to Phoenix where Trump will later give an immigration speech."

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4 guidelines to avoid fabrication in your news coverage

Fabrication in news publishing can take many forms, from creating sources and embellishing stories to making quotes sound different from what was actually said. Here are some best practices to avoid fabrication from Geanne Belton, Ruth Hochberger and Jane Kirtley, journalists and educators who are the authors of the Poynter course on avoiding plagiarism and fabrication.

  • Be a stickler for accuracy. Develop and maintain guidelines and high standards for accuracy in the facts you report.
  • Take responsibility for every fact. Confirm every fact yourself with what you've observed, you've heard in interviews with credible sources and what you've learned in authoritative documents. Attribute the facts to your sources.
  • Stick to the facts. Avoid embellishing or exaggerating for the sake of telling a more dramatic story.
  • Be aware of the legal risks. Fabrication not only damages your career and the reputation of your organization. It can result in legal liability if your fabrication could harm someone’s reputation.

Taken from Avoiding Plagiarism and Fabrication, a self-directed course by Geanne Belton, Ruth S. Hochberger and Jane Kirtley at Poynter NewsU.

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