In Case You Missed It

The New York Times Nicole Perlroth and David Sanger

New York Times Moscow bureau targeted by hackers

"But so far, there is no evidence that the hackers, believed to be Russian, were successful."

Digiday Jessica Davies

CNN launches digital bureau in Nigeria

"But getting the tone right to appeal to not just the Nigerian audience but Africa as a whole is tough. Bureau chief Stephanie Busari believes it can be done with the right balance of social content and locally source stories that have global resonance."

The New York Times John Herrman

How Facebook is polarizing the news

"Facebook, in the years leading up to this election, hasn’t just become nearly ubiquitous among American internet users; it has centralized online news consumption in an unprecedented way."

Politico Jack Shafer

Opinion: Fox News has limited its audience by focusing on conservatives

"As all tabloid editors know, it’s easier to manufacture outrage (the 'war' on Christmas, anchor babies, Benghazi overload and other choice hunks of silly umbrage) than it is to report on more consequential outrages."

The New York Times Farhad Manjoo

What Gawker gave the internet

"So I end with a sort of equivocation, one that might have made for a good Gawker post: A lot of the internet is wonderful. A lot of the internet is terrible. For both, blame Gawker."

Freedom of the Press Foundation Trevor Timm

11 questions for journalists cheering the demise of Gawker

Among them: "Do you think it’s fair and just that Gawker – which employees dozens of journalists and staff that had nothing to do with the Hogan story – receive what amounted to the death penalty for one serious lapse in editorial judgement?"

Nieman Lab Shan Wang

Inside TEGNA's digital-first broadcast strategy

"By following the lead of our employees to create content that is digital first, it frees them up from the sameness of format that is plaguing local television news."

CNN Evan Perez and Shimon Prokupecz

FBI investigating Russian hack of New York Times reporters

"Hackers thought to be working for Russian intelligence have carried out a series of cyber breaches targeting reporters at the New York Times and other US news organizations."

The New York Times Staff

The New York Times is crowdsourcing its political reporting

"We've built a tool, called AdTrack, that allows you to share the ads you see on Facebook with our reporters and editors. You can install it in your web browser using the instructions below."

The Wall Street Journal Keach Hagey

Will Disney buy Vice Media?

Disney already has an 18 percent stake in Vice Media. And its founder, Shane Smith, isn't shooting the notion down.

Medium Jeff Jarvis

Native advertising (probably) isn't going to save journalism

"I have long wondered whether native advertising would do what advertising is supposed to do: drive sales. What is the efficacy of replacing five-word banners with 500-word stories? Perhaps we are beginning to find out."

Politico Joe Pompeo

The New York Times is eyeing expansions to Canada and Australia

"The company has already dispatched research teams to lay the groundwork and has begun recruiting journalists to build out small newsrooms in both countries, similar to the Mexico City-based, digital Spanish-language operation for Latin America that the Times launched earlier this year."

The Associated Press RAPHAEL SATTER and MAGGIE MICHAEL

The dark side of Wikileaks

"WikiLeaks' global crusade to expose government secrets is causing collateral damage to the privacy of hundreds of innocent people, including survivors of sexual abuse, sick children and the mentally ill, The Associated Press has found."

The New York Times Jim Dwyer

Andrea Tantaros sues Fox News

The former Fox host is leveling serious charges in a new suit. "Fox News masquerades as a defender of traditional family values, but behind the scenes, it operates like a sex-fueled, Playboy Mansion-like cult, steeped in intimidation, indecency and misogyny.”

WWD Alexandra Steigrad

InStyle gets a new editor in chief

"Brown most recently served as Harper's Bazaar's features and special projects and executive director."

In case you missed it

The New York Times Nicole Perlroth and David Sanger

New York Times Moscow bureau targeted by hackers

"But so far, there is no evidence that the hackers, believed to be Russian, were successful."

Digiday Jessica Davies

CNN launches digital bureau in Nigeria

"But getting the tone right to appeal to not just the Nigerian audience but Africa as a whole is tough. Bureau chief Stephanie Busari believes it can be done with the right balance of social content and locally source stories that have global resonance."

The New York Times John Herrman

How Facebook is polarizing the news

"Facebook, in the years leading up to this election, hasn’t just become nearly ubiquitous among American internet users; it has centralized online news consumption in an unprecedented way."

ADVERTISEMENTS

Training

Seminars and classes about journalism

Coffee Break Course

A two-minute course from News University

9 guidelines to access public and private property

While the First Amendment protects your right to engage in speech, it does not grant you complete access to the property of others. Here are some guidelines to protect yourself from legal risks.

  • Get consent. If you have any doubts about your right to enter property, get consent to enter first.
  • Don’t assume permission. Make sure your use of the property is consistent with your right to be there. If you are invited onto someone's porch for an interview, do not assume that you can access other areas where you were not specifically invited.
  • Don’t misrepresent yourself. If you feel that it is necessary to assume another persona to gain access to public or private property, get legal assistance to find out how best to proceed.
  • Get a press pass. Depending on the event, the property owner or agency may have a process for getting a pass. Sometimes, organizations require proof that you are a journalist, but in some cases you can simply assert that there is a public interest in publishing information from the forum or event.
  • Don’t interfere. Even if you're on public property, you may face charges of harassment or assault if you interfere with people. If you are covering a breaking event, cooperate with authorities, police and emergency personnel to be sure that you are not interfering with rescue or other emergency efforts.
  • Be cautious with special equipment. You may be liable for intrusion if you use advanced equipment, such as telephoto lenses or highly sensitive microphones, to obtain information or photographs that you could not have gotten otherwise.
  • Get consent to record. Where possible, get consent from the people you record.  Consent can often be granted expressly, by someone specifically telling you that you can photograph them (which you should get in writing), but it can also be implied. If a person fails to object to your presence after you identify yourself as a member of the media (or publisher of a blog, etc.), courts will generally consider this to be implied consent.
  • Don’t use concealed equipment. Avoid concealed cameras or microphones unless you have obtained legal advice in advance. Even if your subject consents or you are invited into their home, you could still face liability if you use a concealed camera or recording device. Courts have sometimes held that the person's consent only extends to the face-to-face interview and not to any concealed recording.
  • Be careful when you’re reporting. Remember that legal liability can arise simply on the act of newsgathering. It is not necessary for you to publish what you gather to be liable.

Taken from Newsgathering Law & Liability: A Guide for Reporting, a self-directed course by David Ardia and Geanne Belton at Poynter NewsU.

Take the full course

Have you missed a Coffee Break Course? Here's our complete lineup.

Poynter's News University

Poynter's News University is the world's most innovative journalism and media e-learning program. From mobile tools and social media strategies to writing and reporting techniques, we've got more than 400 free and low-cost courses to build your career. Whether it’s an interactive program or on-demand video teaching, our online training lets you learn on your own schedule, anytime, anywhere. Put the power of NewsU training to work in your newsroom, your classroom and your organization.

On Campus & Around the World

Join Poynter faculty and the industry’s brightest minds and most accomplished journalists and educators for several days of intensive learning on our campus in St. Petersburg , Florida or at locations around the world. Our seminars are designed to sharpen your skills, elevate your career and ignite your imagination.

Upcoming Seminars & Events

Private Programs and Training Partnerships

Poynter faculty teach in newsrooms, classrooms and conference rooms all around the world. Since 2014, we have forged training partnerships with more than 20 major media and educational organizations including Gannett, McClatchy, Google, AP, National Geographic and Univision. From training programs for your entire organization to individual coaching, we can create programs to focus on your specific training needs.

Learn more

Get Poynter Prepared

Get a personalized training experience with our Poynter Prepared Membership Program. With each membership level, you will have access to instant perks, services and benefits that will help you on your way to career success. Available benefits include exclusive invitations, free courses, discounts on all Poynter training and private coaching by Poynter faculty. We will help you be a better journalist. And you'll help Poynter advance journalism and support democracy on a global scale.

Become a member

About Poynter

A global leader in journalism. Strengthening democracy.

The Poynter Story

Since its founding in 1975, The Poynter Institute has had one goal: to elevate journalism. More than 40 years later, our role in strengthening democracy has never been more important.

Each year, Poynter reaches thousands of journalists around the world through a combination of seminars in St. Petersburg and around the globe, e-learning courses through News University, our news and information site on Poynter.org, and much much more. Last year alone, we trained journalists from 126 countries and have forged training partnerships with more than 20 major media organizations, including Gannett, Google, National Geographic and Univision.

Learn more

Our Communities

For 40 years, The Poynter Institute has had one goal: to make journalism better. Whether you’re a journalist working in a newsroom, an entrepreneur looking to scale your startup, an educator looking for resources to help you and your students, or a media organization seeking a training partner, Poynter can help.

Let Poynter connect you with the community to meet your unique training needs.

Looking for other ways to connect with Poynter? Visit Poynter's Facebook page and join our Linked-In group.

Learn More

Events

Poynter offers a variety of events that help members of the community better understand issues surrounding journalism and the people who produce it. Speakers have ranged from political contributor and strategist Ana Navarro, to satirist and author Andy Borowitz, MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, and a number of Pulitzer Prize winners including David Barstow of The New York Times, Tim Nickens and Dan Ruth of the Tampa Bay Times, and David Maraniss of The Washington Post.

See our lineup

Thought Leadership

Poynter regularly brings together media executives, journalists, technologists and academics to share ideas and expertise focused on the future of news. From audience engagement and mobile newsgathering to issues of sustainable news models, you’ll hear robust discussion around the intersection of journalism, technology and the public interest.

Support Poynter

The Institute’s role in strengthening democracy has never been more important. Your support makes a difference in the lives of journalists and the citizens they serve. Please consider making a gift to the Institute to advance journalism and democracy during this age of profound change.

Support Poynter