In Case You Missed It

TalkingBizNews CHRIS ROUSH

Law360 goes union

"The unofficial vote count is 109 in favor of joining the union and nine against."

Vox Media Matthew Yglesias

Vox calls out AP's exposé on Hillary Clinton

"The nut fact that the AP uses to lead its coverage is wrong, and Braun and Sullivan’s reporting reveals absolutely no unethical conduct."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

Behind the demise of a for-profit student newspaper in Florida

"Gannett owns two college newspapers in Florida — it’s closed one and cutting costs at the other."

Columbia Journalism Review Nausicaa Renner

As sites abandon comments, The Coral Project aims to turn the tide

"The Coral Project’s first tool, called Trust, will allow news organizations to access user data, and therefore enable them to find and identify the best commenters."

The New York Times Nicole Perlroth and David Sanger

New York Times Moscow bureau targeted by hackers

"But so far, there is no evidence that the hackers, believed to be Russian, were successful."

Digiday Jessica Davies

CNN launches digital bureau in Nigeria

"But getting the tone right to appeal to not just the Nigerian audience but Africa as a whole is tough. Bureau chief Stephanie Busari believes it can be done with the right balance of social content and locally source stories that have global resonance."

The New York Times John Herrman

How Facebook is polarizing the news

"Facebook, in the years leading up to this election, hasn’t just become nearly ubiquitous among American internet users; it has centralized online news consumption in an unprecedented way."

Politico Jack Shafer

Opinion: Fox News has limited its audience by focusing on conservatives

"As all tabloid editors know, it’s easier to manufacture outrage (the 'war' on Christmas, anchor babies, Benghazi overload and other choice hunks of silly umbrage) than it is to report on more consequential outrages."

The New York Times Farhad Manjoo

What Gawker gave the internet

"So I end with a sort of equivocation, one that might have made for a good Gawker post: A lot of the internet is wonderful. A lot of the internet is terrible. For both, blame Gawker."

Freedom of the Press Foundation Trevor Timm

11 questions for journalists cheering the demise of Gawker

Among them: "Do you think it’s fair and just that Gawker – which employees dozens of journalists and staff that had nothing to do with the Hogan story – receive what amounted to the death penalty for one serious lapse in editorial judgement?"

Nieman Lab Shan Wang

Inside TEGNA's digital-first broadcast strategy

"By following the lead of our employees to create content that is digital first, it frees them up from the sameness of format that is plaguing local television news."

CNN Evan Perez and Shimon Prokupecz

FBI investigating Russian hack of New York Times reporters

"Hackers thought to be working for Russian intelligence have carried out a series of cyber breaches targeting reporters at the New York Times and other US news organizations."

The New York Times Staff

The New York Times is crowdsourcing its political reporting

"We've built a tool, called AdTrack, that allows you to share the ads you see on Facebook with our reporters and editors. You can install it in your web browser using the instructions below."

The Wall Street Journal Keach Hagey

Will Disney buy Vice Media?

Disney already has an 18 percent stake in Vice Media. And its founder, Shane Smith, isn't shooting the notion down.

Medium Jeff Jarvis

Native advertising (probably) isn't going to save journalism

"I have long wondered whether native advertising would do what advertising is supposed to do: drive sales. What is the efficacy of replacing five-word banners with 500-word stories? Perhaps we are beginning to find out."

In case you missed it

TalkingBizNews CHRIS ROUSH

Law360 goes union

"The unofficial vote count is 109 in favor of joining the union and nine against."

Vox Media Matthew Yglesias

Vox calls out AP's exposé on Hillary Clinton

"The nut fact that the AP uses to lead its coverage is wrong, and Braun and Sullivan’s reporting reveals absolutely no unethical conduct."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

Behind the demise of a for-profit student newspaper in Florida

"Gannett owns two college newspapers in Florida — it’s closed one and cutting costs at the other."

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Questions to ask non-profit staff when you’re covering scientific research

Journalists talk to a variety of sources about scientific research. Different types of sources have different qualifications and can provide different types of information. Here are some considerations and questions when you are interviewing non-profit representatives about a study you are covering.

For subject matter expertise, ask:

  • Background and training
  • Educational history
  • Depth of knowledge in the field

In the interview, ask:

  • Has the study’s author(s) ever been connected to the organization? (As a board member, member, donations, etc.)
  • How does this study and its findings relate to the mission of your organization?
  • Why does the study matter?
  • If opposed, can you explain what the study got wrong or ignored?
  • If supportive, can you explain the impact of the study on the future?
  • Have interests opposed to the study’s findings ever been connected to the organization? (As board members, members, funders, etc.)
  • Does the organization have any financial connections to study's researchers, other participating scientists, home organization or the group funding the study? (Check 990s)
  • Does the organization have any financial connections to businesses potentially helped or harmed by the study’s findings? (Check 990s)

Taken from Whose Truth? Tools for Smart Science Journalism in the Digital Age, a self-directed course by Elissa Yancey at Poynter NewsU.

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