In Case You Missed It

Digiday Lucia Moses

'At GQ, the homepage is a priority'

“There are a lot of incentives to not pay attention to the homepage these days. And those exist around us as well. But if you can build a homepage to serve your most loyal audience, there is great value.”

Temple University Shannon McLaughlin Rooney

The Guardian's Aron Pilhofer headed for Temple University

"Pilhofer, Executive Editor of Digital for The Guardian and a former editor of digital strategy at The New York Times, will take a newly established endowed professorship, the James B. Steele Chair in Journalism Innovation."

PressGazette Freddy Mayhew

A new tool from The Guardian lets advertisers ride the wave of popular stories

“As it starts to see content coming close to surging, our data analytics tool informs our advertising technology which then can pass that information to our advertisers who are accessing our inventory programmatically and in real time.”

ProPublica Robert Faturechi

Defamation lawsuit against ProPublica and CIR thrown out

"The lawsuit stemmed from an August 2014 story published by the two nonprofit newsrooms that revealed an apparent security breach at the Arizona Counter Terrorism Information Center, an intelligence center set up by state and local authorities after the 9/11 terror attacks."

Politico LOUIS NELSON

Congressman threatens to have Politico reporter arrested

"Rep. Alan Grayson threatened to have a POLITICO reporter arrested Tuesday, alleging that the reporter assaulted him as he attempted to question the congressman about allegations of domestic abuse."

Sophie Kleeman Gizmodo

TechCrunch gets hacked

"OurMine, the hacking group that took credit for breaking into the social media accounts of Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey, apparently has a new target: news sites."

Twitter Carl Bernstein

Carl Bernstein joins Twitter

"Hello, Twitter. After all this time, finally surrendering to being less wordy. Looking forward."

The Guardian Constanze Letsch

Turkey issues warrants for 42 journalists in relation to failed coup

"Turkish authorities have issued arrest warrants for 42 journalists as part of an inquiry into alleged plotters of the failed coup, drawing harsh criticism from human rights groups."

Politico Hadas Gold

Media complain of heat, rain at the DNC convention

"The email, sent by the Democratic National Committee's media logistics team to some media, said that 'tents in the vicinity of the' Wells Fargo Center are 'not designated to fully protect inhabitants in the event of a direct lightning strike.'"

Newsweek ZACH SCHONFELD

Are we living in a golden age of stunt journalism?

"A decade ago, stunts like this might have been fodder for a reality show, like Fear Factor or maybe Jackass. Today, the Jackasses are just as likely to be professional journalists, dressing up as Marilyn Monroe or strapping on an adult diaper in the name of content."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

New York Times will add editor’s note to story that omitted record of cop who criticized Black Lives Matter

"...An Editor’s Note will soon be appended to the story to reflect previously reported complaints about Lt. Finn’s conduct that should have been made clear to readers in our story."

CNN Money Brian Stelter

Some of Yahoo's media all-stars looking to leave after Verizon deal

"Yahoo spent millions of dollars to hire media all-stars like Katie Couric, Joe Zee and David Pogue. So what's going to happen with them now that Yahoo is being swallowed up by Verizon?"

Politico Ken Doctor

With Yahoo win, Verizon sidles up to Google, Facebook

"Verizon is buying one big thing: reach, and the consumer data that comes along with it. Yahoo still shows in the unique audience horse race in the U.S. With 208 million visitors in June, it finds itself more than 30 million behind Facebook and 50 million behind Google, with long-distance runner Microsoft nipping at its heels."

Bloomberg Gerry Smith

Can CNN catch Fox?

"Roger Ailes’ exit from Fox News, which he built over two decades into the most-watched news network, could present an opening for rival CNN to close the ratings gap."

The Hollywood Reporter Michael Wolff

What will Roger Ailes do next?

"The game has changed, but it is surely still on. What does Ailes do, who does he do it with, how does he reassert his indomitableness and how does he do it to cost the Murdochs — who last week barred him from the Fox News building — as much as possible?"

In case you missed it

Digiday Lucia Moses

'At GQ, the homepage is a priority'

“There are a lot of incentives to not pay attention to the homepage these days. And those exist around us as well. But if you can build a homepage to serve your most loyal audience, there is great value.”

Temple University Shannon McLaughlin Rooney

The Guardian's Aron Pilhofer headed for Temple University

"Pilhofer, Executive Editor of Digital for The Guardian and a former editor of digital strategy at The New York Times, will take a newly established endowed professorship, the James B. Steele Chair in Journalism Innovation."

PressGazette Freddy Mayhew

A new tool from The Guardian lets advertisers ride the wave of popular stories

“As it starts to see content coming close to surging, our data analytics tool informs our advertising technology which then can pass that information to our advertisers who are accessing our inventory programmatically and in real time.”

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How surveys can help you understand your news audience

You want your audience to engage with your news product: read it, value it, think about it, talk about it, share it, return to it and trust it.

So you have to understand your audience's behaviors, needs and motivations to create stories and products that are valuable and engaging. The deepest, most accurate understanding of your audience comes from quantitative and qualitative research.

Here are the pros and cons of surveys--one of the major methods to gather data about your audience.

PROS

  • Surveys can be anonymous, which is useful for sensitive topics.
  • Surveys allow you to generalize your findings. If you talk to the right sample of people, called a statistically valid random sample, and have a high enough response rate, you can generalize to the entire population. This allows you to make broad statements about a population or group’s likely motivations or behavior. Population trends can be very attractive to advertisers and for big programming or content-related decisions.
  • Surveys are pretty easy to implement online, making data easy to collect and analyze quickly.
  • Surveys are easily repeatable. That means you can test changes in the audience across time.

CONS

  • Online surveys are not always representative of the entire population. This is especially true if some members of your potential audience do not have or regularly use email.
  • Doing surveys right takes time. You need to carefully craft questions to ensure they are high-quality, valid and reliable. Have friends and family take the survey to make sure it makes sense.
  • Surveys are good for trends but not good for rich detail because you have a limited ability to probe. You will not understand the narrative of someone’s media use simply because he or she took your survey.
  • Surveys can be costly. You may have to buy a list of respondents or hire someone to implement your survey.

Taken from Understanding Audiences and Their Behavior, a self-directed course by Rachel Davis Mersey at Poynter NewsU.

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