In Case You Missed It

Digiday Grace Caffyn

As WhatsApp starts sharing data with Facebook, some brands see dollar signs

"WhatsApp’s move to roll out features for businesses is a game-changer, but only for 'un-creepy' brands, marketers say."

The New York Times Mark Thompson

New York Times CEO publishes op-ed on Donald Trump

"...For all its protests, anti-rhetoric is just another form of rhetoric and, whether Mr. Trump is conscious of it or not, it has its own rhetorical markers."

Twitter New York Post

Gabriel Sherman: Many of Roger Ailes' alleged harassment episodes are beyond statute of limitations

"2 sources briefed on PW investigation say 21CF in settlement talks w/ only 3 women whose harassment by Ailes is within statute of limitation."

CNN Money Brian Stelter

Donald Trump demands apology from Mika Brzezinski

"The GOP nominee says Friday's interview of Burns was a 'coordinated gang attack.' In a statement on Sunday, Trump called it 'one of the most appalling things I have ever seen on television.'"

Time Jorge Ramos

Jorge Ramos: "Neutrality is not an option" while covering Donald Trump

It doesn’t matter who you are—a journalist, a politician or a voter—we’ll all be judged by how we responded to Donald Trump.

Quartz Joon Ian Wong, Dave Gershgorn and Mike Murphy

Facebook lays off Trending Topics team

"Quartz confirmed from multiple sources that Facebook has laid off the entire editorial staff on the Trending team—15-18 workers contracted through a third party."

The New York Times Jim Rutenberg

Clinton and Trump aren't allowing the press on their planes.

"This is about something much bigger than eyewitness accounts and plane rides. It’s about how much we want to know about each candidate’s plans for the White House, and how open and accessible we want them to be as president."

NPAA Uncredited

The FAA's new drone journalism rules go into effect today. Here's what you need to know

All the links you need to get up to speed on the changes.

USA Today Michael Wolff

Is a shakeout looming for digital media companies?

"Digital media remains not just a tricky proposition but a largely theoretical one. Nobody really knows what it is or how it succeeds. It’s a dialectic, an argument about future possibilities."

The Guardian Jasper Jackson and Mark Sweney

Vice founder prompts major pushback with UK lecture

"Shane Smith aimed to shake up the Edinburgh TV festival with his MacTaggart lecture – but many in the industry challenge his criticisms of old media."

The Washington Post Margaret Sullivan

What would Trump TV look like?

"An hour of 'The Sean Hannity Show,' an hour of ‘The Ann Coulter Show,’ an hour of ‘The Milo Yiannopoulos Show’ and ‘The Steve Bannon Yells at You for an Hour Show.’ ”

Committee to Protect Journalists Sumit Galhotra and Raksha Kumar

Journalists are killed with impunity in India

"In the 27 cases of journalists murdered for their work in India since CPJ began keeping records in 1992, there have been no convictions. More than half of those killed reported regularly on corruption."

CNN Money Alex Koppelman

AP's Kathleen Carroll defends Clinton investigation but admits 'sloppy' tweet

"Associated Press Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll is defending her organization's controversial investigation into meetings Hillary Clinton took while Secretary of State – but she admits a tweet the AP sent out about its story was 'sloppy.'"

CNN Money Brian Stelter

Fox News' 400-page oppo file on Gabriel Sherman

"The memo, obtained by CNNMoney from two anonymous sources, is a stunning display of Ailes' campaign-like strategies. It includes, among other things, property records, voter registration information, and a note that the researchers could find no criminal record for Sherman."

Recode KURT WAGNER

Facebook says humans won’t write its trending topic descriptions anymore

"It is not, however, cutting out humans entirely. In fact, Facebook employees will still select which stories ultimately make it into the trending section."

In case you missed it

Digiday Grace Caffyn

As WhatsApp starts sharing data with Facebook, some brands see dollar signs

"WhatsApp’s move to roll out features for businesses is a game-changer, but only for 'un-creepy' brands, marketers say."

The New York Times Mark Thompson

New York Times CEO publishes op-ed on Donald Trump

"...For all its protests, anti-rhetoric is just another form of rhetoric and, whether Mr. Trump is conscious of it or not, it has its own rhetorical markers."

Twitter New York Post

Gabriel Sherman: Many of Roger Ailes' alleged harassment episodes are beyond statute of limitations

"2 sources briefed on PW investigation say 21CF in settlement talks w/ only 3 women whose harassment by Ailes is within statute of limitation."

ADVERTISEMENTS

Training

Seminars and classes about journalism

Coffee Break Course

A two-minute course from News University

How solutions journalism makes your reporting stronger

Solutions journalism is a "howdunnit" approach that offers rigorous and compelling coverage about responses to social problems — reporting that adheres to the highest of journalistic standards. This approach makes watchdog reporting even stronger. Here are other strengths of solutions journalism.

Solutions Journalism Provides Context

Journalism that fails to cover responses to social problems provides an inaccurate and biased view of reality. By regularly highlighting problems without including responses, journalists can convey a false sense that people haven’t tried to fix things or don’t know how to do any better. Solutions-oriented journalism can, in many cases, provide a more accurate picture of the world.

Solutions Journalism Increases Reader Engagement

Research shows that solutions stories are more likely to be shared on social media than traditional stories. This is partly because they can make people feel powerful, less likely to tune out and less apathetic or cynical about the problem.

Solutions Journalism Can Have an Impact

By showing how different institutions approach problems, solutions journalism can advance the public discourse. Instead of “he said, she said” coverage, solutions-oriented journalism can lead to more constructive conversations. People need models for change — so do societies.

Taken from Solutions Journalism in Every Newsroom, a self-directed course at Poynter NewsU.

Take the full course

Have you missed a Coffee Break Course? Here's our complete lineup. Or follow along at #coffeebreakcourse.

Poynter's News University

Poynter's News University is the world's most innovative journalism and media e-learning program. From mobile tools and social media strategies to writing and reporting techniques, we've got more than 400 free and low-cost courses to build your career. Whether it’s an interactive program or on-demand video teaching, our online training lets you learn on your own schedule, anytime, anywhere. Put the power of NewsU training to work in your newsroom, your classroom and your organization.

On Campus & Around the World

Join Poynter faculty and the industry’s brightest minds and most accomplished journalists and educators for several days of intensive learning on our campus in St. Petersburg , Florida or at locations around the world. Our seminars are designed to sharpen your skills, elevate your career and ignite your imagination.

Upcoming Seminars & Events

Private Programs and Training Partnerships

Poynter faculty teach in newsrooms, classrooms and conference rooms all around the world. Since 2014, we have forged training partnerships with more than 20 major media and educational organizations including Gannett, McClatchy, Google, AP, National Geographic and Univision. From training programs for your entire organization to individual coaching, we can create programs to focus on your specific training needs.

Learn more

Get Poynter Prepared

Get a personalized training experience with our Poynter Prepared Membership Program. With each membership level, you will have access to instant perks, services and benefits that will help you on your way to career success. Available benefits include exclusive invitations, free courses, discounts on all Poynter training and private coaching by Poynter faculty. We will help you be a better journalist. And you'll help Poynter advance journalism and support democracy on a global scale.

Become a member

About Poynter

A global leader in journalism. Strengthening democracy.

The Poynter Story

Since its founding in 1975, The Poynter Institute has had one goal: to elevate journalism. More than 40 years later, our role in strengthening democracy has never been more important.

Each year, Poynter reaches thousands of journalists around the world through a combination of seminars in St. Petersburg and around the globe, e-learning courses through News University, our news and information site on Poynter.org, and much much more. Last year alone, we trained journalists from 126 countries and have forged training partnerships with more than 20 major media organizations, including Gannett, Google, National Geographic and Univision.

Learn more

Our Communities

For 40 years, The Poynter Institute has had one goal: to make journalism better. Whether you’re a journalist working in a newsroom, an entrepreneur looking to scale your startup, an educator looking for resources to help you and your students, or a media organization seeking a training partner, Poynter can help.

Let Poynter connect you with the community to meet your unique training needs.

Looking for other ways to connect with Poynter? Visit Poynter's Facebook page and join our Linked-In group.

Learn More

Events

Poynter offers a variety of events that help members of the community better understand issues surrounding journalism and the people who produce it. Speakers have ranged from political contributor and strategist Ana Navarro, to satirist and author Andy Borowitz, MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, and a number of Pulitzer Prize winners including David Barstow of The New York Times, Tim Nickens and Dan Ruth of the Tampa Bay Times, and David Maraniss of The Washington Post.

See our lineup

Thought Leadership

Poynter regularly brings together media executives, journalists, technologists and academics to share ideas and expertise focused on the future of news. From audience engagement and mobile newsgathering to issues of sustainable news models, you’ll hear robust discussion around the intersection of journalism, technology and the public interest.

Support Poynter

The Institute’s role in strengthening democracy has never been more important. Your support makes a difference in the lives of journalists and the citizens they serve. Please consider making a gift to the Institute to advance journalism and democracy during this age of profound change.

Support Poynter