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In Case You Missed It

Digiday LUCINDA SOUTHERN

UK publishers see Facebook Live viewership stagnate

"Facebook Live is stagnating in the U.K. And with Facebook ending payments to media companies for creating live video, publishers don’t expect to ramp up live video production in the next six months."

The New Yorker Evan Osnos

Can the White House pick its press?

"Anonymity, ritually bemoaned and practiced by both sides, endures because it allows members of government, high and low, to speak more freely."

Politico Media JACK SHAFER

Reporters, don't let baby Donald make you cry

"I understand the press corps’ fury, but does the reaction make sense?"

Politico LOUIS NELSON

Bush breaks with Trump, calls media 'indispensable to democracy'

"The White House has also struggled to plug leaks that have proven damaging or embarrassing to the administration, in one case forcing the resignation of national security adviser Michael Flynn just weeks into Trump’s first term."

LION Publishers Dylan Smith

Matt DeRienzo as first full-time executive director

"As a mostly volunteer-based organization, we've been able to accomplish a great deal on behalf of local independent news publishers since our 2012 founding."

Nieman Lab Joshua Benton

A (very short) question-and-answer session with Marc Andreseen about the future of news

"I think I am more convinced that consolidation needs to happen (across broadcast TV, cable TV, newspaper, magazine, radio, wire service, Internet)."

CJR Thomas Vinciguerra

Grammar pros find internet stardom

"In an age of texting and tweeting, these folks are trying to keep the mother tongue healthy, and their presence constitutes a refreshing renaissance for a profession that is generally underappreciated and rarely noticed—until, of course, a mistake shows up in print."

CNBC Fred Imbert

Warren Buffett thinks the NYT and WSJ will survive

"There are only two newspapers Warren Buffett thinks can survive in the industry's hugely difficult climate: The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times."

New York Lauren Starke

Vulture to launch on Snapchat Discover

"Vulture today announced its coming launch on Snapchat’s Discover platform, expanding its unmatched entertainment coverage to a Discover channel with a weekly Publisher Story."

The New York Times MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

In Trump-CNN battle, two presidents who love a spectacle

"'Our folks are just doing their jobs,' Mr. Zucker declared at a recent lunch with journalists, who prodded him about the slings and arrows that Mr. Trump has gleefully lobbed his way. 'They wear those insults as a badge of honor.'"

Digiday SAHIL PATEL

Meet CNN's 6-person cartoons team

"Funded by CNN, Great Big Story is an independent subsidiary of the news giant focused on inspirational and edgy content for social and mobile platforms."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

Opinion: Sean Spicer is losing his grip

"Spicer didn’t respond to emails. But here’s a good one for him: What’s next?"

Politico Jack Shafer

How to know when a Trump story becomes a scandal

"What are the chances the larva of the Russia scandal now growing on the Trump presidency will mature into pupa form and ultimately emerge, wings flapping, as a spitting, snarling adult scandal?"

The Washington Post Margaret Sullivan

Daniel Ellsberg asks: Who will be the next Snowden?

"Almost five decades after the first Pentagon Papers story was published in 1971, revealing the secret history of the Vietnam War, the 85-year-old Ellsberg still isn’t done making trouble."

Politico REBECCA MORIN

Press pool left in darkness as Trump dines at his hotel

"With the pool reporter sidelined, and the symbolism hard to miss, many journalists speculated on social media about what the president was up to."

In case you missed it

Digiday LUCINDA SOUTHERN

UK publishers see Facebook Live viewership stagnate

"Facebook Live is stagnating in the U.K. And with Facebook ending payments to media companies for creating live video, publishers don’t expect to ramp up live video production in the next six months."

The New Yorker Evan Osnos

Can the White House pick its press?

"Anonymity, ritually bemoaned and practiced by both sides, endures because it allows members of government, high and low, to speak more freely."

Politico Media JACK SHAFER

Reporters, don't let baby Donald make you cry

"I understand the press corps’ fury, but does the reaction make sense?"

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4 guidelines for writing SEO-friendly headlines

Headlines are lifelines to our readers. They grab attention, build trust and help time-pressed consumers focus on the stories they care most about. They link readers with our content, giving us a chance to reach our audience across a sea of information.

Headlines also help search engines decide whether our offerings match what users are looking for. Most search queries are two to four words long and consist of proper names and keywords. The best headlines will match the most common relevant search queries. Here are some guidelines for choosing your words.

  • Keywords. Common words and phrases that describe the subject of your story: “earthquake,” “city council election,” “starting lineup,” “benefit concert.”
  • Proper names. Search terms tend to contain proper names. Names of people, places, companies and organizations are all common search queries, either by themselves or with other keywords. Including commonly used names in your headline will help you match such queries.
  • Full personal names. Users searching for information on a person are more likely to use both first and last names in their searches, but print headlines have traditionally only used last names. An SEO-friendly headline will use both names. (Also: If the author of the article is well known and likely to be searched -- an opinion columnist, for example -- you might want to use the author's full name in the headline.)
  • Unique information. What is it about your story that people might be looking for that other websites don’t have?

A word of caution: You are writing for readers, not search engines. Sometimes headline writers get carried away with SEO. It’s counterproductive to put these goals ahead of clarity and common sense.

Taken from Writing Online Headlines: SEO and Beyond, a self-directed course by Eric Ulken at Poynter NewsU.

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