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In Case You Missed It

Variety Gene Maddaus and Ricardo Lopez

L.A. Times masthead massacre capped a month of newsroom turmoil

"Sources familiar with the situation tell Variety that the paper’s top investigative reporter, Paul Pringle, filed complaints with the human resources department about top editors, alleging that the story was being delayed due to cozy relations between the editors and USC officials."

The Philadelphia Tribune John N. Mitchell

Anzio Williams makes history at NBC10

"Anzio Williams is the vice president of news for NBC10 and Telemundo62. He's one of a handful of African Americans across the country with that title."

That's nonsense Craig Charles

The best (or worst?) fake solar eclipse photos

"The above photo – probably the most prolifically shared fake photo online – apparently depicts the solar eclipse where the light glare forms a perfect cross, and has been shared by many religious-themed social media pages. However this certainly doesn’t depict the 2017 solar eclipse."

Politico BRENNAN GILMORE

How I became fake news

"I witnessed a terrorist attack in Charlottesville. Then the conspiracy theories began."

Nieman Lab RICARDO BILTON

Quartz created a bot that can break news — and wants to help other news orgs develop their own

"The news site plans to unveil a suite of Slack-based tools designed to simplify the process of creating bots to follow certain pages or data."

Axios Sara Fischer

Coming soon: A standard for cross-platform video measurement

"The media industry's standards group, the MRC (Media Rating Council), is gathering comments for a proposed 'Audience Measurement Standard' that will be finalized and introduced in Q3."

Ad Age Lindsay Stein

How Brian Wieser got to be the most-quoted man in advertising

"When Pivotal Research analyst Wieser speaks, everyone from small investors to holding company titans like WPP's Martin Sorrell listen. His recommendations and reports can lift or sink an advertising or media company stock."

The Washington Post Michael J. Socolow

Gawker has been gone for a year. We’ve never needed it more than now.

"Now that Gawker’s buried, we might consider what we lost when that mischievous and irresponsible purveyor of gossip was shuttered."

KCUR DAN MARGOLIES

3 Kansas City Star veterans take buyout

"The Star also made some additional cost-cutting moves last week, laying off a handful of newsroom employees and offering buyouts to several veterans."

The Wall Street Journal Jonathan Randles

Univision says lawsuit over Deadspin story intended to scare journalists

"A division of Univision Communications Inc. has sought to quickly defeat a defamation lawsuit brought over an article published on the sports website Deadspin, saying the complaint is intended to intimidate journalists."

HuffPost Michael Calderone

Steve Bannon’s return to Breitbart may cause rift In Trump’s media base

"The former White House strategist has long viewed Murdoch’s Fox News as 'globalist' in approach versus his 'populist, nationalist' Breitbart."

Digiday Max Willens

The HuffPost’s tabloid-style homepage is paying dividends

"Since the site overhauled its homepage four months ago, the number of people going directly to the site’s homepage is up 23 percent, year over year." But overall traffic is still down from its election peak.

Politico ANDREW FEINBERG

My life at a Russian propaganda network

"I thought they’d let me be a real journalist at Sputnik news. I was wrong."

The Daily Beast LACHLAN MARKAY and ASAWIN SUEBSAENG

Jeffrey Lord, fired pro-Trump CNN figure, in talks with Breitbart

"With Steve Bannon taking over the conservative website, two of the Donald Trump’s best-known boosters could end up teaming up."

Recode KURT WAGNER

CNN is ditching its Snapchat Discover magazine in favor of a daily Snapchat news show

"The show, called 'The Update,' will run three to five minutes long and publish at 6 pm ET each day. CNN will update the show with breaking news throughout the evening and early morning before the next day’s episode airs."

In case you missed it

Variety Gene Maddaus and Ricardo Lopez

L.A. Times masthead massacre capped a month of newsroom turmoil

"Sources familiar with the situation tell Variety that the paper’s top investigative reporter, Paul Pringle, filed complaints with the human resources department about top editors, alleging that the story was being delayed due to cozy relations between the editors and USC officials."

The Philadelphia Tribune John N. Mitchell

Anzio Williams makes history at NBC10

"Anzio Williams is the vice president of news for NBC10 and Telemundo62. He's one of a handful of African Americans across the country with that title."

That's nonsense Craig Charles

The best (or worst?) fake solar eclipse photos

"The above photo – probably the most prolifically shared fake photo online – apparently depicts the solar eclipse where the light glare forms a perfect cross, and has been shared by many religious-themed social media pages. However this certainly doesn’t depict the 2017 solar eclipse."

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3 guidelines for writing breaking-news leads

In an age in which technology gives us the ability to publish anytime, anywhere, on any platform, it can be tricky to choose the best lead--especially when the news is breaking.

Here are some guidelines to make sure your story is the one your audience chooses.

Time

  • Did the story just happen?
  • Are you the first to report it, or will most of your audience already know about it?
  • Is the time element crucial?

Audience needs

  • Will your audience get the news from you first?
  • If they already know the news, would they be better served with a lead that anticipates their knowledge?

Exclusivity

  • Are you the only news organization that has the story? Scoops once counted for more when several newspapers published in a city. Now the competition is from TV, online, social--you name it. If there is a story that only you have, you might want to tell readers it is an exclusive.

Taken from The Lead Lab, a self-directed course by Chip Scanlan at Poynter NewsU.

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