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In Case You Missed It

CJR Jeff Gerth

In the digital age, The New York Times treads an increasingly slippery path between news and advertising

"Today, the paper is actively ignoring some of those recommendations, amid increasing signs that one of the last remaining firewalls in journalism is crumbling."

Nieman Lab Joseph Lichterman

The New York Times is now charging for its cooking site

"The New York Times on Wednesday relaunched its NYT Cooking recipe site and app as a paid product, part of its continued push toward building a sustainable subscriber-based business."

ProPublica Julia Angwin

Facebook’s secret censorship rules protect white men from hate speech but not black children

"A trove of internal documents sheds light on the algorithms that Facebook’s censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression."

Digiday Lucia Moses

For small publishers, Facebook is often a force for good — and frustration

"Small publishers have a love-hate relationship with Facebook. They love it because it can turbo-charge audience growth, but they hate perpetually being the last to know about changes — and not having much luck getting help."

Digiday Seb Joseph

Inside football startup Dugout’s plan to help clubs turn content into cash

"Six months ago, some of the world’s biggest football clubs –Arsenal, Chelsea and FC Barcelona — joined together to form the Dugout, betting they could collectively form their own media entity."

Digiday Ilyse Liffreing

What to know about visual search

"Everything in digital media is going visual, including search. Platforms and brands have experimented with the technology for years to improve in-store experiences, increase engagement and retarget audiences."

Columbia Journalism Review The Editors

Q&A: Susan Orlean on the art of not prepping for interviews

"For the next five weeks, the Columbia Journalism Review and MaximumFun.org will broadcast conversations with some of the world’s greatest interviewers. Hosted by NPR’s Jesse Thorn, the podcast, called The Turnaround, will examine the science and art of journalism."

Vanity Fair Sarah Ellison

Can Megyn Kelly outrun her NBC "nightmare"?

"The broadcaster’s first month at the network has been full of surprises, and not the kind anyone wants. Can she put it behind her?"

Buzzfeed Charlie Warzel

A teacher is suing Breitbart and James O'Keefe's Project Veritas for defamation

"Steve Wentz, the president of a Kansas teacher’s union, filed a defamation lawsuit in Orlando, Florida last week against Breitbart News and Project Veritas, the self-described investigative video site run by conservative activist James O'Keefe."

The Guardian Uncredited

Myanmar: Detained journalists to be charged under colonial-era law

"Three Myanmar reporters detained at an undisclosed location by the army will be charged under a colonial-era statute against “unlawful association” and face up to three years in jail, government and army officials have said."

Dallas News Mike Wilson

How news organizations, including this one, unintentionally misinformed the public on guns

"Here is the unfortunate story of how a couple of teams of researchers and a whole bunch of news organizations, including this one, unintentionally but thoroughly misinformed the public."

The Guardian Stephen Buranyi

Is the staggeringly profitable business of scientific publishing bad for science?

"Many scientists also believe that the publishing industry exerts too much influence over what scientists choose to study, which is ultimately bad for science itself."

The New York Times Michael M. Grynbaum

A costly retraction for CNN and an opening for Trump

"...the mea culpa did not stop Mr. Trump and his supporters from seizing on the mistake, condemning CNN and claiming it as evidence that other major news organizations were conspiring against the administration."

Committee to Protect Journalists Joel Simon

CPJ to use $50,000 Gianforte donated as part of body slam settlement to track other assaults on press

"When the news came that Greg Gianforte was making a $50,000 donation to the Committee to Protect Journalists it was 10 p.m. on the East Coast, but 8:30 a.m. in Naypyidaw, Myanmar's Disney-like capital city, where members of our CPJ team were meeting officials to discuss that country's punitive press laws."

Think Progress Judd Legum

The inside story of how TMZ quietly became America’s most potent pro-Trump media outlet

"After the release of the infamous Access Hollywood video where Trump was caught bragging about sexual assault, Trump struggled to generate positive coverage. One notable exception: TMZ."

In case you missed it

CJR Jeff Gerth

In the digital age, The New York Times treads an increasingly slippery path between news and advertising

"Today, the paper is actively ignoring some of those recommendations, amid increasing signs that one of the last remaining firewalls in journalism is crumbling."

Nieman Lab Joseph Lichterman

The New York Times is now charging for its cooking site

"The New York Times on Wednesday relaunched its NYT Cooking recipe site and app as a paid product, part of its continued push toward building a sustainable subscriber-based business."

ProPublica Julia Angwin

Facebook’s secret censorship rules protect white men from hate speech but not black children

"A trove of internal documents sheds light on the algorithms that Facebook’s censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression."

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5 fact-checking tips for editors

Facts matter in all types of writing, especially in news and informational texts. Errors of fact can damage a writer's credibility and cause embarrassment, and they can irritate readers. Many fact errors are preventable, and that's where editors come in. Your first step is to identify the potential fact errors in the writing. Here are next steps:

  • Find at least two sources to verify information. Use reliable sources and websites.
  • Ask the writer for source materials if necessary. Check the text against recordings, documents or notes.
  • Trust your gut. If something seems odd to you, check it. Don’t risk letting a mistake slip through.
  • Don’t assume. Don’t assume that what is written is correct. Don’t assume that something you think you know is correct. Don't assume that writers and reporters did the math correctly (check all numbers and perform all calculations). Don't assume that "facts" repeated from other media are accurate.
  • Keep an eye out. Once you find a mistake, you’re not done. There may be another one lurking right behind it. Look over the entire piece with your eagle eye so you are sure to spot all the errors.

Taken from Fundamentals of Editing, a self-directed course by Andy Bechtel, Lisa McLendon and Sue Burzynski Bullard at Poynter NewsU. Here's our lineup of editing courses and certificates with ACES.

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