ADVERTISEMENT

In Case You Missed It

Vulture Boris Kachka

Why was Times theater critic Charles Isherwood fired?

"Isherwood was confronted with nine of his own emails, which the paper claimed as evidence that the critic had violated ethical rules. Shortly afterward, he was escorted out of the building."

Financial Times Shannon Bond

Time Inc looks to sell services to 30 million subscribers

"Pet insurance and online videos among ideas to replace erosion in ads and circulation."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

This anti-Brexit newspaper first launched as a pop-up, but it’s doing well enough to continue indefinitely

"If I were a U.S. journalist, I would be looking to launch The Trump Watch."

Nieman Lab NATALIA MAZOTTE

Politico for Brazil?

"Revenue from a three-times-daily insider newsletter for corporate clients supports a newsgathering operation of more than 20 writers."

Politico NICHOLAS VINOCUR AND ANDREW HANNA

Breitbart's growth has stalled in Europe

"The provocative website promised to conquer the continent — but has yet to roll out sites in France or Germany ahead of elections."

The New York Times Farhad Manjoo

I ignored Trump news for a week. Here’s what I learned

"There’s no easy way out of this fix. But as big as Mr. Trump is, he’s not everything — and it’d be nice to find a way for the media ecosystem to recognize that."

Politico Hadas Gold

The Daily Beast hires Lachlan Markay as Washington correspondent

"Markay joins from The Washington Free Beacon, where he's worked since 2013, and where he built a name for himself as a conservative journalist focusing on money and politics."

New York Post Claire Atkinson

Snapchat closes in on $200 million ad deal

"The mega-deal would be a step-up for Evan Spiegel’s Snap, which has dealt up to now in one-off advertising deals where agencies and marketers commit $400,000 to $600,000 over 24 hours to sponsor a lens or a filter."

Bustle ALEX GLADU

The Washington Post's new slogan: Democracy dies in darkness

"We thought it would be a good, concise value statement that conveys who we are to the many millions of readers who have come to us for the first time over the last year."

Politico Jack Shafer

How Trump can learn to love leaking

"But there is no leak crisis, only a leak panic, as David E. Pozen’s 2013 law review article The Leaky Leviathan: Why the Government Condemns and Condones Unlawful Disclosures of Information helps demonstrate."

Digiday LUCINDA SOUTHERN

Where European publishers struggle with video

"For publishers creating more video content than ever before, the choices before them can be paralyzing."

Digiday MAX WILLENS

The New York Times is experimenting with mobile-specific headlines

"After 10 months of A/B testing its headlines seriously, the New York Times has started slicing its audience into finer segments, albeit informally."

Columbia Journalism Review Emily Bell

How Mark Zuckerberg could really fix journalism

"We can begin a more engaged debate now…about the type of information environment we want to create in the smoking ruins of the one that has been systematically destroyed by external and internal forces."

The Washington Post Margaret Sullivan

Five ways President Trump can become media literate

"Granted, this is tough for our president. Last October, Trump revved up his campaign rallies with the idea that Hillary Clinton was on performance-enhancing drugs."

Cleveland Plain Dealer George Rodrigue

Introducing the enemies of the American people

"Elizabeth Neuffer is there. We worked in Bosnia together, and covered the first Gulf War and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Once, after going for at least a week without a shower, she begged me to grab a bucket and help wash her hair. She had been arrested, and robbed, and threatened with everything from rape to murder. Sometimes she was scared, but she persisted."

In case you missed it

Vulture Boris Kachka

Why was Times theater critic Charles Isherwood fired?

"Isherwood was confronted with nine of his own emails, which the paper claimed as evidence that the critic had violated ethical rules. Shortly afterward, he was escorted out of the building."

Financial Times Shannon Bond

Time Inc looks to sell services to 30 million subscribers

"Pet insurance and online videos among ideas to replace erosion in ads and circulation."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

This anti-Brexit newspaper first launched as a pop-up, but it’s doing well enough to continue indefinitely

"If I were a U.S. journalist, I would be looking to launch The Trump Watch."

ADVERTISEMENTS

Training

Seminars and classes about journalism

Coffee Break Course

A two-minute course from News University

6 ways to spread facts

The simple but frustrating truth is that facts alone are not enough to convince people. Even the most thorough, accurate piece of reporting might still be trumped by a poorly reasoned and false counterargument. Therefore, it's crucial to understand how to publish persuasive factual journalism.

Here are some tips for spreading facts:

Don't Hesitate: Act quickly to dispel and debunk myths. The longer journalists wait to challenge misinformation, the more entrenched the lies become.

Be Positive: Rather than saying “Barack Obama is not a Muslim,” say, “Barack Obama is a Christian.” Negation can help reinforce the exact things we're attempting to debunk. It feeds into the illusion of truth.

Avoid Condemnation: Don’t personalize. It's incredibly difficult to change a person's closely held beliefs. Journalists need to make it comfortable for people to change their minds. Express the correct information in a positive way that appeals to your audience.

Find Credible Experts: People are more likely to change their minds if they can identify with the sources who are presenting contradictory information. Republicans will give more credence to a fellow Republican, and the same goes for Democrats. If the experts are in line with the views and values of our target audience, we have a better chance of changing minds.

Tell a Story, Show a Picture: One study found that infographics can be an effective tool for debunking false beliefs. A Nieman Journalism Lab article about the findings reported that "graphical presentation of corrections (and of controversial information in general) can be more powerful than their textual counterparts in terms of convincing people to amend their misperceptions." Another powerful way to convince people is to utilize one of the best tools of storytelling: narrative. Building a compelling story that appeals to human emotion is a great way to capture attention and offer a convincing take on an issue.

Don’t Look Back. Remember the illusion of truth, and avoid repeating the misinformation. Debunk it and move forward, always remembering to express the accurate information in a positive formulation.

Taken from Getting It Right: Accuracy and Verification in the Digital Age, a self-directed course by Craig Silverman at Poynter NewsU. You can also join our Poynter NewsU webinar with Silverman, Investigating the Internet: How to Sniff Out Scams.

Take the full course

Have you missed a Coffee Break Course? Here's our complete lineup.

Poynter's News University

Poynter's News University is the world's most innovative journalism and media e-learning program. From mobile tools and social media strategies to writing and reporting techniques, we've got more than 400 free and low-cost courses to build your career. Whether it’s an interactive program or on-demand video teaching, our online training lets you learn on your own schedule, anytime, anywhere. Put the power of NewsU training to work in your newsroom, your classroom and your organization.

On Campus & Around the World

Join Poynter faculty and the industry’s brightest minds and most accomplished journalists and educators for several days of intensive learning on our campus in St. Petersburg , Florida or at locations around the world. Our seminars are designed to sharpen your skills, elevate your career and ignite your imagination.

Upcoming Seminars & Events

Private Programs and Training Partnerships

Poynter faculty teach in newsrooms, classrooms and conference rooms all around the world. Since 2014, we have forged training partnerships with more than 20 major media and educational organizations including Gannett, McClatchy, Google, AP, National Geographic and Univision. From training programs for your entire organization to individual coaching, we can create programs to focus on your specific training needs.

Learn more

Get Poynter Prepared

Get a personalized training experience with our Poynter Prepared Membership Program. With each membership level, you will have access to instant perks, services and benefits that will help you on your way to career success. Available benefits include exclusive invitations, free courses, discounts on all Poynter training and private coaching by Poynter faculty. We will help you be a better journalist. And you'll help Poynter advance journalism and support democracy on a global scale.

Become a member

About Poynter

A global leader in journalism. Strengthening democracy.

The Poynter Story

Since its founding in 1975, The Poynter Institute has had one goal: to elevate journalism. More than 40 years later, our role in strengthening democracy has never been more important.

Each year, Poynter reaches thousands of journalists around the world through a combination of seminars in St. Petersburg and around the globe, e-learning courses through News University, our news and information site on Poynter.org, and much much more. Last year alone, we trained journalists from 126 countries and have forged training partnerships with more than 20 major media organizations, including Gannett, Google, National Geographic and Univision.

Learn more

Our Communities

For 40 years, The Poynter Institute has had one goal: to make journalism better. Whether you’re a journalist working in a newsroom, an entrepreneur looking to scale your startup, an educator looking for resources to help you and your students, or a media organization seeking a training partner, Poynter can help.

Let Poynter connect you with the community to meet your unique training needs.

Looking for other ways to connect with Poynter? Visit Poynter's Facebook page and join our Linked-In group.

Learn More

Events

Poynter offers a variety of events that help members of the community better understand issues surrounding journalism and the people who produce it. Speakers have ranged from political contributor and strategist Ana Navarro, to satirist and author Andy Borowitz, MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, and a number of Pulitzer Prize winners including David Barstow of The New York Times, Tim Nickens and Dan Ruth of the Tampa Bay Times, and David Maraniss of The Washington Post.

See our lineup

Thought Leadership

Poynter regularly brings together media executives, journalists, technologists and academics to share ideas and expertise focused on the future of news. From audience engagement and mobile newsgathering to issues of sustainable news models, you’ll hear robust discussion around the intersection of journalism, technology and the public interest.

Support Poynter

The Institute’s role in strengthening democracy has never been more important. Your support makes a difference in the lives of journalists and the citizens they serve. Please consider making a gift to the Institute to advance journalism and democracy during this age of profound change.

Support Poynter