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In Case You Missed It

CNN Brian Stelter

David Fahrenthold is now a CNN contributor

"Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold, a breakout star of the 2016 campaign for his coverage of Donald Trump's foundation, is CNN's newest contributor."

Medium Sean Blanda

The reason you can't stand news anymore

"The methods used to fund modern journalism simultaneously undermine trust in the news outlets."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

BuzzFeed News boss: We didn't want to suppress Trump allegations

“I do think when you have a document in that kind of circulation among the country’s elites, at the center of an incredibly heated political battle, the argument for keeping it away from the American people has to be really, really strong.”

Politico Jack Shafer

Opinion: Trump's election was good for journalism

"It’s not winter that’s coming with the inauguration of Trump. It’s journalistic spring."

YouTube NBC

Donald Trump's news conference gets the SNL treatment

Alec Baldwin reprises his role as President-elect.

The Washington Post Callum Borchers

Tons of headlines are good news for Donald Trump

"A muddle is good for Trump — and he knows it. And you can bet that he will fill next week, inauguration week, with everything and nothing, all at the same time."

CNN Brian Stelter

Video: BuzzFeed boss defends publishing Trump dossier

CNN's Brian Stelter discusses the decision to publish the 35-page dossier with BuzzFeed's Ben Smith.

The Verge Amar Toor

Facebook rolls out fake news filter in Germany

"Facebook will begin rolling out its fake news filter in Germany, The Financial Times reports, where lawmakers have expressed growing concern over the spread of fabricated news stories and Russian interference ahead of national elections later this year."

Esquire Peter Boyer

The Trump administration may evict the press from the White House

"If the plan goes through, one of the officials said, the media will be removed from the cozy confines of the White House press room, where it has worked for several decades."

The New York Times Leonard Downie, Jr.

Donald Trump’s dangerous attacks on the press

"This is a dangerous road that Mr. Trump is heading down, mashing together, in a sweeping complaint, CNN’s conscientious approach with BuzzFeed’s ill-considered action."

The Hill JOE CONCHA

Journalists join together for panel on how to cover Trump

"Slate will host the event next Wednesday, called 'Not the New Normal.' CNN’s Brian Stelter will moderate the panel at New York University."

The Chicago Tribune Colin McMahon

The Chicago Tribune's RedEye is becoming a weekly newspaper

"We will concentrate print efforts to expand our Thursday edition, ending print on other days so we can deliver all you need to enjoy your weekend dining, drinking and doing."

The Washington Post Wash Post PR

The Washington Post is hiring more videographers

"'We believe video is a critical storyform, and we have the potential to transform what users come to expect from publishers by building on our strengths and creating programming specifically for emerging platforms such as over-the-top (OTT),' said Micah Gelman, director of editorial video for The Washington Post."

NPR Elizabeth Jensen

The thinking behind NPR's reporting on the Trump dossier

"Once again, NPR finds itself in the uncomfortable position of reporting on unverified information, just as it did last year when WikiLeaks dumped troves of what it said were hacked emails taken from Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman, John Podesta, and from top officials of the Democratic National Committee."

Politico KELSEY SUTTON

Independent Review Journal staffers leave for CNN

"Bennett and Schwarz, who co-write IJR’s noontime politics newsletter, The Political Edit, informed IJR management that they were leaving the publication Friday morning. They will join CNN Politics on Monday, in time to cover the presidential inauguration next week."

In case you missed it

CNN Brian Stelter

David Fahrenthold is now a CNN contributor

"Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold, a breakout star of the 2016 campaign for his coverage of Donald Trump's foundation, is CNN's newest contributor."

Medium Sean Blanda

The reason you can't stand news anymore

"The methods used to fund modern journalism simultaneously undermine trust in the news outlets."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

BuzzFeed News boss: We didn't want to suppress Trump allegations

“I do think when you have a document in that kind of circulation among the country’s elites, at the center of an incredibly heated political battle, the argument for keeping it away from the American people has to be really, really strong.”

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How to tell an audio story without narration

Standard audio stories have a host introduction, narration, voice tracks and actualities (such as natural sound). But you can also use non-narrated pieces, stories that don't include the reporter's voice or storytelling. Non-narrated pieces aren’t usual, but they can be effective when paired with the right story. These stories can take several forms.

  • First-person essays. This works well for commentaries, when a particular point of view is presented.
  • Man on the street. In this non-narrated approach, a reporter asks people’s reactions to a question or issue. Plan to ask each person two or three questions. Back in the studio, you’ll create a montage of the best responses.
  • Voice collages. This structure incorporates many voices into a tight space. It provides different answers to a single question. Usually, the answers are provided in succession, after an initial setup. This format works best with a very specific subject. It also works best in short form: 30 seconds is a typical length for a collage.
  • Features. You can also present a person’s responses to a set of interview questions without the reporter speaking. This formats works especially well when people tell a story about their life or something they've done.

Use a non-narrated approach with a particular purpose in mind. It won’t work for every topic, so don’t force it on a story that would benefit from another approach.

Taken from Writing for the Ear, a self-directed course by Dan Grech at Poynter NewsU.

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