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In Case You Missed It

The Intercept Jeremy Scahill

James Risen interviewed

"This week on Intercepted, the New York Times investigative journalist breaks down Trump’s declaration that journalists are the enemy and analyzes Trump’s royal court."

Columbia Journalism Review Paul Delaney

Inside the struggle to diversify The New York Times

"We felt empowered, on a righteous mission to lead America in the right direction, to egg it on to finally live up to its promise and principles. We were so naively optimistic back then."

Axios Sara Fischer and Shannon Vavra

Behind the explosion of right-wing news

"Axios mapped the launch date of 89 news websites over the past quarter century. The data shows there has been an explosion of right-leaning news sites, coinciding with the rise of the Tea Party and alt-right movements beginning in 2010."

Digiday BRIAN BRAIKER

What publishers admire about the Google-Facebook duopoly

"Facebook and Google understand the users’ needs. They have all the data, they know how to read it and integrate it into products like AMP and Instant Articles."

The New York Times SYDNEY EMBER

New York Times names editor to steer daily coverage

"Alison Mitchell, who oversaw the paper’s daily news report through the presidential election, will become an assistant editor on the masthead."

CNN Dylan Byers

Kellyanne Conway sidelined from TV after Flynn debacle

"Kellyanne Conway, once the most visible spokesperson for the Trump White House, was sidelined from television appearances for a week for making statements that were at odds with the administration's official stance, White House sources told CNNMoney on Wednesday."

CNN Brian Stelter

Conservative provocateur targets CNN with secret recordings

"O'Keefe said in a telephone interview with CNN on Wednesday that he has 'a few hundred hours' of 'secretly recorded material' from inside the network. 'We're calling it CNN Leaks,' he said, drawing inspiration from WikiLeaks' document dumps."

Vanity Fair Sarah Ellison

Megyn Kelly, Matt Lauer and the battle for the future of NBC

"In his high-profile, high-priced hire of Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly, NBC News chief Andy Lack placed a major bet on star power. But Lack’s biggest, priciest talent, Today’s Matt Lauer, provides something of a cautionary tale. With morning news being one of the last mass television markets, its personalities can draw fire as well as ratings."

CNN Money Dylan Byers

Media more trustworthy than Trump, poll finds

"Republicans trust Donald Trump. Everyone else trusts the media."

Politico Jack Shafer

The press corps is giving Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster a tongue bath

"I come not to knock the lieutenant general — who seems deserving of a portion of this love — but to question the instant consensus that has formed and wrapped itself around the press corps psyche like an African Rock Python."

BuzzFeed Steven Perlberg

Facebook is trying to smooth over relationships with the media

"Facebook’s new head of news partnerships Campbell Brown is hosting off-the-record events at her Manhattan home with big-name media people like the New Yorker’s David Remnick and Vox’s Melissa Bell."

Vulture Boris Kachka

Why was Times theater critic Charles Isherwood fired?

"Isherwood was confronted with nine of his own emails, which the paper claimed as evidence that the critic had violated ethical rules. Shortly afterward, he was escorted out of the building."

Financial Times Shannon Bond

Time Inc looks to sell services to 30 million subscribers

"Pet insurance and online videos among ideas to replace erosion in ads and circulation."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

This anti-Brexit newspaper first launched as a pop-up, but it’s doing well enough to continue indefinitely

"If I were a U.S. journalist, I would be looking to launch The Trump Watch."

Nieman Lab NATALIA MAZOTTE

Politico for Brazil?

"Revenue from a three-times-daily insider newsletter for corporate clients supports a newsgathering operation of more than 20 writers."

In case you missed it

The Intercept Jeremy Scahill

James Risen interviewed

"This week on Intercepted, the New York Times investigative journalist breaks down Trump’s declaration that journalists are the enemy and analyzes Trump’s royal court."

Columbia Journalism Review Paul Delaney

Inside the struggle to diversify The New York Times

"We felt empowered, on a righteous mission to lead America in the right direction, to egg it on to finally live up to its promise and principles. We were so naively optimistic back then."

Axios Sara Fischer and Shannon Vavra

Behind the explosion of right-wing news

"Axios mapped the launch date of 89 news websites over the past quarter century. The data shows there has been an explosion of right-leaning news sites, coinciding with the rise of the Tea Party and alt-right movements beginning in 2010."

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Coffee Break Course

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6 ways to spread facts

The simple but frustrating truth is that facts alone are not enough to convince people. Even the most thorough, accurate piece of reporting might still be trumped by a poorly reasoned and false counterargument. Therefore, it's crucial to understand how to publish persuasive factual journalism.

Here are some tips for spreading facts:

Don't Hesitate: Act quickly to dispel and debunk myths. The longer journalists wait to challenge misinformation, the more entrenched the lies become.

Be Positive: Rather than saying “Barack Obama is not a Muslim,” say, “Barack Obama is a Christian.” Negation can help reinforce the exact things we're attempting to debunk. It feeds into the illusion of truth.

Avoid Condemnation: Don’t personalize. It's incredibly difficult to change a person's closely held beliefs. Journalists need to make it comfortable for people to change their minds. Express the correct information in a positive way that appeals to your audience.

Find Credible Experts: People are more likely to change their minds if they can identify with the sources who are presenting contradictory information. Republicans will give more credence to a fellow Republican, and the same goes for Democrats. If the experts are in line with the views and values of our target audience, we have a better chance of changing minds.

Tell a Story, Show a Picture: One study found that infographics can be an effective tool for debunking false beliefs. A Nieman Journalism Lab article about the findings reported that "graphical presentation of corrections (and of controversial information in general) can be more powerful than their textual counterparts in terms of convincing people to amend their misperceptions." Another powerful way to convince people is to utilize one of the best tools of storytelling: narrative. Building a compelling story that appeals to human emotion is a great way to capture attention and offer a convincing take on an issue.

Don’t Look Back. Remember the illusion of truth, and avoid repeating the misinformation. Debunk it and move forward, always remembering to express the accurate information in a positive formulation.

Taken from Getting It Right: Accuracy and Verification in the Digital Age, a self-directed course by Craig Silverman at Poynter NewsU. You can also join our Poynter NewsU webinar with Silverman, Investigating the Internet: How to Sniff Out Scams.

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