ADVERTISEMENT

In Case You Missed It

Twitter MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

New York Observer editor is departing

He’ll be a senior managing director at TENEO, a C-suite advisory firm.

Reuters Jessica Toonkel

Facebook signs BuzzFeed, Vox, others for original video shows

"Facebook Inc (FB.O) has signed deals with millennial-focused news and entertainment creators Vox Media, BuzzFeed, ATTN, Group Nine Media and others to make shows for its upcoming video service."

The Boston Globe Scott LaPierre and Taylor DeLench

The Boston Globe's Dorchester printing press is shutting down

"Four stories tall, loud as a locomotive, and with at least as many moving parts, The Boston Globe’s printing presses on Morrissey Boulevard will come to a stop next month."

CJR Michael Rosenwald

Is the quest for profits and clicks killing local news?

"It’s now as clear as 56-point type that newspapers are responding to the continued upheaval by shattering the very foundation of what news and newspapering have meant since the days of the penny press."

BuzzFeed Mary Ann Georgantopoulos

Sean Hannity's Seth Rich obsession just cost him an advertiser

"Cars.com is the first company to pull its ads in light of Sean Hannity pushing a conspiracy theory surrounding the death of a DNC staffer."

http://www.apnorc.org/Pages/default.aspx Various

Trust in news depends on outlet you mean

The latest in a series of surveys on media trust finds high negatives for media generally but a more accepting view of those outlets an individual uses most. The report, from the American Press Institute and AP-NORC center at the University of Chicago, found that users rate their favored news sources much higher on accuracy as well as morality and "caring about the people they report on."

Elle RACHAEL COMBE

Another Maggie Haberman profile

"Journalists have become part of the story in the Trump administration, enablers and heroes of a nonstop political and constitutional soap opera, and last year Haberman was the most widely read journalist at the Times, according to its analytics."

The Hollywood Reporter Eriq Gardner

Fox News seeks sanctions for "hoax" lawsuit as Andrea Tantaros' lawyer renews spying claim

"Fox News has filed a blistering response to a lawsuit that accuses the cable network of having "tortured" former anchor Andrea Tantaros by feeding nasty stuff about her to social media 'sock-puppet' accounts."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

How The Washington Post plans to use Talk, The Coral Project’s new commenting platform

"By outlining and making clear what your expectations are for the space, you’re already creating a greater likelihood of success."

Digiday Max Willens

How pop-up magazine gets sponsors to do live ads

"Pinterest wants to make $500 million in revenue this year. More video ads should help."

Axios Stef W. Kight

Media companies published a lot of Trump-Russia stories last week

"The number of people who actually saw those stories on Facebook was second only to when BuzzFeed published an unverified Trump dossier in January."

Recode KURT WAGNER

Pinterest is putting its autoplay video ads in a lot more places

"Pinterest wants to make $500 million in revenue this year. More video ads should help."

Columbia Journalism Review Emily Bell

Facebook’s moderation process is of public interest. It should be public knowledge.

"It is clear from the documents that Facebook, like all digital publishers, struggles with the quality of discourse published through its platform."

Digiday Sahil Patel

‘They’re not prepared’: Publishers worry the Flashpocalypse is nearly here

"Multiple publishers, speaking anonymously with Digiday due to existing relationships with advertising and technology partners, say that most advertisers and ad tech vendors are not fully prepared for the cutoff date, potentially leaving publishers to pick up the scraps and suffer losses in revenue."

The New York Times ALEXANDRA ALTER

Amazon sets up shop in the heart of the publishing industry

"The company’s push into physical stores might seem at odds with its origins as an online retailer. But it fits with Amazon’s continuing expansion into nearly every corner of the publishing industry."

In case you missed it

Twitter MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

New York Observer editor is departing

He’ll be a senior managing director at TENEO, a C-suite advisory firm.

Reuters Jessica Toonkel

Facebook signs BuzzFeed, Vox, others for original video shows

"Facebook Inc (FB.O) has signed deals with millennial-focused news and entertainment creators Vox Media, BuzzFeed, ATTN, Group Nine Media and others to make shows for its upcoming video service."

The Boston Globe Scott LaPierre and Taylor DeLench

The Boston Globe's Dorchester printing press is shutting down

"Four stories tall, loud as a locomotive, and with at least as many moving parts, The Boston Globe’s printing presses on Morrissey Boulevard will come to a stop next month."

ADVERTISEMENTS

Training

Seminars and classes about journalism

Coffee Break Course

A two-minute course from News University

Pros (and cons) of open-ended or closed poll questions

Every poll involves a questionnaire that contains a standardized set of questions that are asked of every person. The way a question is asked can affect the answers that people give.

In an open-ended question, people answer in their own terms. In a closed-ended format, people choose from a given list of answers. (The vast majority of polling questions are closed-ended.)

One example is the “most important problem” question. This is asked most commonly in the open-ended form used by the Gallup organization: What is the most important problem facing the country today?

But some polling organizations ask the question this way: Which of the following problems is the most important one facing the country today?

This closed-ended form produces a shorter list of problems, based upon the length of the list. It may also produce other differences based upon the order in which the “problems” are listed.

Advantages and disadvantages exist in using either form. Open-ended questions are good for really getting at what is on people’s minds and having people talk about issues in their own words. On the other hand, open-ended responses can be hard to code into meaningful categories, particularly in tight time frames; they take more time to administer, so the researcher must ask fewer questions; and they can be hard to draw conclusions from if only a small number of people provide any given response.

Closed-ended questions are considerably easier to administer and analyze, but they can sometimes make people feel constrained in their answers, particularly if the categories do not include the response a person wants to provide.

Taken from Understanding and Interpreting Polls, a self-directed course at Poynter NewsU, developed in partnership with the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR).

Take the full course

Have you missed a Coffee Break Course? Here's our complete lineup. Or follow along at #coffeebreakcourse.

Poynter's News University

Poynter's News University is the world's most innovative journalism and media e-learning program. From mobile tools and social media strategies to writing and reporting techniques, we've got more than 400 free and low-cost courses to build your career. Whether it’s an interactive program or on-demand video teaching, our online training lets you learn on your own schedule, anytime, anywhere. Put the power of NewsU training to work in your newsroom, your classroom and your organization.

On Campus & Around the World

Join Poynter faculty and the industry’s brightest minds and most accomplished journalists and educators for several days of intensive learning on our campus in St. Petersburg , Florida or at locations around the world. Our seminars are designed to sharpen your skills, elevate your career and ignite your imagination.

Upcoming Seminars & Events

Private Programs and Training Partnerships

Poynter faculty teach in newsrooms, classrooms and conference rooms all around the world. Since 2014, we have forged training partnerships with more than 20 major media and educational organizations including Gannett, McClatchy, Google, AP, National Geographic and Univision. From training programs for your entire organization to individual coaching, we can create programs to focus on your specific training needs.

Learn more

Get Poynter Prepared

Get a personalized training experience with our Poynter Prepared Membership Program. With each membership level, you will have access to instant perks, services and benefits that will help you on your way to career success. Available benefits include exclusive invitations, free courses, discounts on all Poynter training and private coaching by Poynter faculty. We will help you be a better journalist. And you'll help Poynter advance journalism and support democracy on a global scale.

Become a member

About Poynter

A global leader in journalism. Strengthening democracy.

The Poynter Story

Since its founding in 1975, The Poynter Institute has had one goal: to elevate journalism. More than 40 years later, our role in strengthening democracy has never been more important.

Each year, Poynter reaches thousands of journalists around the world through a combination of seminars in St. Petersburg and around the globe, e-learning courses through News University, our news and information site on Poynter.org, and much much more. Last year alone, we trained journalists from 126 countries and have forged training partnerships with more than 20 major media organizations, including Gannett, Google, National Geographic and Univision.

Learn more

Our Communities

For 40 years, The Poynter Institute has had one goal: to make journalism better. Whether you’re a journalist working in a newsroom, an entrepreneur looking to scale your startup, an educator looking for resources to help you and your students, or a media organization seeking a training partner, Poynter can help.

Let Poynter connect you with the community to meet your unique training needs.

Looking for other ways to connect with Poynter? Visit Poynter's Facebook page and join our Linked-In group.

Learn More

Events

Poynter offers a variety of events that help members of the community better understand issues surrounding journalism and the people who produce it. Speakers have ranged from political contributor and strategist Ana Navarro, to satirist and author Andy Borowitz, MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, and a number of Pulitzer Prize winners including David Barstow of The New York Times, Tim Nickens and Dan Ruth of the Tampa Bay Times, and David Maraniss of The Washington Post.

See our lineup

Thought Leadership

Poynter regularly brings together media executives, journalists, technologists and academics to share ideas and expertise focused on the future of news. From audience engagement and mobile newsgathering to issues of sustainable news models, you’ll hear robust discussion around the intersection of journalism, technology and the public interest.

Support Poynter

The Institute’s role in strengthening democracy has never been more important. Your support makes a difference in the lives of journalists and the citizens they serve. Please consider making a gift to the Institute to advance journalism and democracy during this age of profound change.

Support Poynter