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In Case You Missed It

The New York Times JOHN WILLIAMS

The founder of Spy is going to write a satirical book about Trump

Kurt Andersen and Alec Baldwin are teaming up.

The New York Times Amanda Hess

How the trolls stole Washington

"Trolling isn’t just about manning an unhinged Twitter account. It describes an ethos. The troll is a figure who skips across the web, saying whatever it takes to rile up unsuspecting targets, relishing the chaos in his wake and feasting on attention, good or bad."

Slate Charles Seife

The domesticated press corps

"Trump is denying journalists their daily nibbles of process and collegiality, and it’s driving them crazy."

The Washington Post Jason Rezaian

Formerly imprisoned Post reporter on watching Trump's speech from Capitol Hill

"...As the main chamber of Congress began to fill, marking the start of the night’s pageantry, I felt very aware of the strange circumstances that had brought me to this moment."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

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"If everyone can agree that this is what the article says, then they have a much better basis for commenting on it."

Columbia Journalism Review Mark Hertsgaard

Should there be a Fox News on the left?

"'Progressives have historically not made unified, effective communications a priority,' says David Fenton, founder of a progressive communications firm.'"

The Washington Post Glenn Kessler and Michelle Ye Hee Lee

Fact-checking last night's Trump speech

"President Trump’s maiden address to Congress was notable because it was filled with numerous inaccuracies."

LA Observed Kevin Roderick

L.A. Magazine sold

"Emmis Communications announced earlier in the day that it had sold its remaining magazines — including Orange Coast in Orange County — to Hour Media Group, which publishes Detroit Home and other Detroit titles, as well as Sacramento magazine."

Bloomberg Alex Sherman

Time Inc. asks suitors to submit offers by next week

"Time’s board of directors wants details on how possible buyers value the company so it can determine whether to pursue a sale of the entire business or individual magazine titles, the people said, asking not to be identified as the details aren’t public."

WWD Kara Bloomgarden-Smoke

Interview magazine is getting a new editor in chief

"The position has been vacant since Keith Pollock left last fall to oversee digital at Architectural Digest."

The Guardian Ruby Warrington

Inside Teen Vogue: 'Our readers consider themselves activists'

"Once known for its beauty tips, Teen Vogue has become a powerful critic of the Trump administration. What’s behind its transformation?"

BuzzFeed Caroline O'Donovan

Hootsuite CEO directs comment-seeking reporter to phone sex line

"Hootsuite CEO Ryan Holmes, responding to a story published by Bloomberg Business today, publicly asked the reporter call him at a number that’s actually a paid sex hotline."

The New York Times ADAM LIPTAK

Barring reporters from briefings: Does it cross a legal line?

"'It has been held impermissible,' Judge Oetken wrote, 'to exclude a single television news network from live coverage of mayoral candidates’ headquarters and to withhold White House press passes in a content-based or arbitrary fashion.'"

Politico Politico staff

The one media mention in Trump's address

"We are providing a voice to those who have been ignored by our media, and silenced by special interests."

The New York Times SUSAN LEHMAN

How The New York Times' Matt Apuzzo broke a huge story on A.T.F.

"Working in an office suite behind a Burger King in Virginia, government agents allegedly swindle American farmers out of $24 million in a cigarette smuggling scam? Sounds like a B-movie."

In case you missed it

The New York Times JOHN WILLIAMS

The founder of Spy is going to write a satirical book about Trump

Kurt Andersen and Alec Baldwin are teaming up.

The New York Times Amanda Hess

How the trolls stole Washington

"Trolling isn’t just about manning an unhinged Twitter account. It describes an ethos. The troll is a figure who skips across the web, saying whatever it takes to rile up unsuspecting targets, relishing the chaos in his wake and feasting on attention, good or bad."

Slate Charles Seife

The domesticated press corps

"Trump is denying journalists their daily nibbles of process and collegiality, and it’s driving them crazy."

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4 guidelines for writing SEO-friendly headlines

Headlines are lifelines to our readers. They grab attention, build trust and help time-pressed consumers focus on the stories they care most about. They link readers with our content, giving us a chance to reach our audience across a sea of information.

Headlines also help search engines decide whether our offerings match what users are looking for. Most search queries are two to four words long and consist of proper names and keywords. The best headlines will match the most common relevant search queries. Here are some guidelines for choosing your words.

  • Keywords. Common words and phrases that describe the subject of your story: “earthquake,” “city council election,” “starting lineup,” “benefit concert.”
  • Proper names. Search terms tend to contain proper names. Names of people, places, companies and organizations are all common search queries, either by themselves or with other keywords. Including commonly used names in your headline will help you match such queries.
  • Full personal names. Users searching for information on a person are more likely to use both first and last names in their searches, but print headlines have traditionally only used last names. An SEO-friendly headline will use both names. (Also: If the author of the article is well known and likely to be searched -- an opinion columnist, for example -- you might want to use the author's full name in the headline.)
  • Unique information. What is it about your story that people might be looking for that other websites don’t have?

A word of caution: You are writing for readers, not search engines. Sometimes headline writers get carried away with SEO. It’s counterproductive to put these goals ahead of clarity and common sense.

Taken from Writing Online Headlines: SEO and Beyond, a self-directed course by Eric Ulken at Poynter NewsU.

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