In Case You Missed It

The Washington Post James McAuley

Le Monde will no longer publish photos of terror suspects

"'Following the Nice attack,' he wrote, 'we will publish no more photographs of the authors of these killings, to avoid the effects of posthumous glorification.'"

The Guardian Roy Greenslade

Newsquest hit by copyright claims

"Copyright claims against the regional newspaper publisher Newsquest/Gannett are increasing because its journalists are publishing photographs without checking their provenance."

The Hollywood Reporter Tobias Burns

Rupert Murdoch emails Fox News: "...this has been a challenging time."

His memo to staff: "There's no doubt this has been a challenging time — amid the conventions and multitude of domestic and international breaking news stories, we had to face being the news last week as well."

Digiday Lucia Moses

Newsletter editors are the new important people in newsrooms

"Publishers are rediscovering that email newsletters are a reliable way to reach readers — and serve a critically important direct connection to audiences that serves as a counterweight to the mercurial algorithms of Facebook."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

An argument against Jeff Lord's pro-Trump punditry

"Paying commentators like Begala to rebut the arguments of paid commentators like Lord is intrinsic to the CNN biz model in campaign 2016."

Digiday Jemma Brackebush

Atlas Obscura turns to sponsored content for first podcast

"The podcast, based on day-long road trips, fits perfectly within the company’s editorial scope aimed at adventure seeking millennials. But rather than traditional host-read ad messages, the podcast wove Zipcar, an Avis subsidiary, into the content itself."

Variety Dave McNary

There's going to be a Panama Papers movie

Netflix "has acquired the rights to the book “The Panama Papers: Breaking the Story of How the World’s Rich and Powerful Hide Their Money,” written by German journalists Frederik Obermaier and Bastian Obermayer."

Digiday Lucia Moses

'At GQ, the homepage is a priority'

“There are a lot of incentives to not pay attention to the homepage these days. And those exist around us as well. But if you can build a homepage to serve your most loyal audience, there is great value.”

Temple University Shannon McLaughlin Rooney

The Guardian's Aron Pilhofer headed for Temple University

"Pilhofer, Executive Editor of Digital for The Guardian and a former editor of digital strategy at The New York Times, will take a newly established endowed professorship, the James B. Steele Chair in Journalism Innovation."

PressGazette Freddy Mayhew

A new tool from The Guardian lets advertisers ride the wave of popular stories

“As it starts to see content coming close to surging, our data analytics tool informs our advertising technology which then can pass that information to our advertisers who are accessing our inventory programmatically and in real time.”

ProPublica Robert Faturechi

Defamation lawsuit against ProPublica and CIR thrown out

"The lawsuit stemmed from an August 2014 story published by the two nonprofit newsrooms that revealed an apparent security breach at the Arizona Counter Terrorism Information Center, an intelligence center set up by state and local authorities after the 9/11 terror attacks."

Politico LOUIS NELSON

Congressman threatens to have Politico reporter arrested

"Rep. Alan Grayson threatened to have a POLITICO reporter arrested Tuesday, alleging that the reporter assaulted him as he attempted to question the congressman about allegations of domestic abuse."

Sophie Kleeman Gizmodo

TechCrunch gets hacked

"OurMine, the hacking group that took credit for breaking into the social media accounts of Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey, apparently has a new target: news sites."

Twitter Carl Bernstein

Carl Bernstein joins Twitter

"Hello, Twitter. After all this time, finally surrendering to being less wordy. Looking forward."

The Guardian Constanze Letsch

Turkey issues warrants for 42 journalists in relation to failed coup

"Turkish authorities have issued arrest warrants for 42 journalists as part of an inquiry into alleged plotters of the failed coup, drawing harsh criticism from human rights groups."

In case you missed it

The Washington Post James McAuley

Le Monde will no longer publish photos of terror suspects

"'Following the Nice attack,' he wrote, 'we will publish no more photographs of the authors of these killings, to avoid the effects of posthumous glorification.'"

The Guardian Roy Greenslade

Newsquest hit by copyright claims

"Copyright claims against the regional newspaper publisher Newsquest/Gannett are increasing because its journalists are publishing photographs without checking their provenance."

The Hollywood Reporter Tobias Burns

Rupert Murdoch emails Fox News: "...this has been a challenging time."

His memo to staff: "There's no doubt this has been a challenging time — amid the conventions and multitude of domestic and international breaking news stories, we had to face being the news last week as well."

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How surveys can help you understand your news audience

You want your audience to engage with your news product: read it, value it, think about it, talk about it, share it, return to it and trust it.

So you have to understand your audience's behaviors, needs and motivations to create stories and products that are valuable and engaging. The deepest, most accurate understanding of your audience comes from quantitative and qualitative research.

Here are the pros and cons of surveys--one of the major methods to gather data about your audience.

PROS

  • Surveys can be anonymous, which is useful for sensitive topics.
  • Surveys allow you to generalize your findings. If you talk to the right sample of people, called a statistically valid random sample, and have a high enough response rate, you can generalize to the entire population. This allows you to make broad statements about a population or group’s likely motivations or behavior. Population trends can be very attractive to advertisers and for big programming or content-related decisions.
  • Surveys are pretty easy to implement online, making data easy to collect and analyze quickly.
  • Surveys are easily repeatable. That means you can test changes in the audience across time.

CONS

  • Online surveys are not always representative of the entire population. This is especially true if some members of your potential audience do not have or regularly use email.
  • Doing surveys right takes time. You need to carefully craft questions to ensure they are high-quality, valid and reliable. Have friends and family take the survey to make sure it makes sense.
  • Surveys are good for trends but not good for rich detail because you have a limited ability to probe. You will not understand the narrative of someone’s media use simply because he or she took your survey.
  • Surveys can be costly. You may have to buy a list of respondents or hire someone to implement your survey.

Taken from Understanding Audiences and Their Behavior, a self-directed course by Rachel Davis Mersey at Poynter NewsU.

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