In Case You Missed It

The New York Times WILLIAM C. RHODEN

"Sports of the Times" columnist exits

"I thought about Brown last week when I decided that Monday would be my final day at The New York Times, and that this would be my final Sports of The Times offering as a full-time columnist at the paper."

Re/code Kara Swisher

Source: Verizon will buy Yahoo for $5 billion

"As per usual, there is always a chance it will not work out and one of the other bidders — most likely Gilbert — might lob in another offer once the terms are revealed."

The Wall Street Journal JENNIFER MALONEY

The fastest-growing format in publishing: audiobooks

"Smartphones and multitasking have stoked an explosion in audiobooks. Publishers, spotting a juggernaut, are expanding their offerings and enlisting star narrators."

Financial Times John Gapper

The Guardian loses $294 million

"GMG has exceeded its target of cutting 250 jobs, with 70 journalists taking voluntary redundancy as the media group struggles to deal with the harsh advertising environment that is hurting print publications."

Twitter Mike Wilson

Marty Baron says he'd do "Spotlight" differently

"In 2001, @PostBaron decided not to run church scandal piece till he had the bigger story. Major scene in Spotlight...I'm not sure I'd make the same decision today."

CNN Money Brian Stelter

Roger Ailes is writing a book

"Ailes has not spoken publicly since Thursday, when he resigned from Fox amid allegations of sexual harassment. But in private, he has told friends he's getting to work on an autobiography he has been mulling for years."

Brian Stelter CNN

Did Fox News leaders permit a culture of sexual harassment to fester?

That's the question raised by Gabriel Sherman, the reporter for New York magazine who's been ahead of everyone else on the Roger Ailes story. The Fox News chairman was ousted last week in the wake of a sexual harassment lawsuit from former Fox Anchor Gretchen Carlson; Sherman says many at Fox News were complicit.

The Huffington Post Michael Calderone

Politico admits "mistake" in sending DNC an article in advance

"Politico acknowledged Sunday that it was a 'mistake' for one of its top reporters to send the Democratic National Committee an advance copy of an article while emphasizing there were no substantive changes made to the piece prior to publication."

Politico Hadas Gold

CNN cuts ties with Donna Brazile

The cable news network ended its relationship with Brazile after she took up the mantle of DNC chair.

The Washington Post Margaret Sullivan

Trump's attacks on the media distort reality

"...Trump’s attacks fall on fertile ground, despite the strong and important journalism that keeps coming from the best news organizations."

New York Various

Journalism all-stars critique the media

"What keeps media people up at night when they’re thinking about what they do for a living? We began by asking ourselves and our peers what they think the media’s greatest faults are."

BuzzFeed Ruby Cramer and Evan McMorris-Santoro

Big Sanders scoop sprang from misplaced memo

It was found in a Los Angeles-area hotel. "The document reveals a campaign in its final days, considering whether to fight on with a 'divisive critique' of Clinton, yet attuned to diminished influence inside the party."

The New York Times John Herrman

A look at the growing role of sponsored content

"Younger companies like Vice and BuzzFeed have built whole businesses around the concept. The Atlantic has said that three-quarters of its ad revenue now comes from sponsored content."

Digiday Sahil Patel

ABC News and Facebook's live GOP convention coverage nets 11.5 million views

"Facebook made a big bet on providing live coverage of the 2016 presidential conventions. And at least with ABC News, Facebook’s official live streaming partner for the events, the bet seems to have paid off."

Digiday Lucia Moses

What PR people hate about reporters

"Refusing to correct a clear error. A reporter for a national newspaper wrote a story that he’s acknowledged was based on a false anonymous tip, but despite his acknowledgement that the story is entirely false, he’s refused to run a correction."

In case you missed it

The New York Times WILLIAM C. RHODEN

"Sports of the Times" columnist exits

"I thought about Brown last week when I decided that Monday would be my final day at The New York Times, and that this would be my final Sports of The Times offering as a full-time columnist at the paper."

Re/code Kara Swisher

Source: Verizon will buy Yahoo for $5 billion

"As per usual, there is always a chance it will not work out and one of the other bidders — most likely Gilbert — might lob in another offer once the terms are revealed."

The Wall Street Journal JENNIFER MALONEY

The fastest-growing format in publishing: audiobooks

"Smartphones and multitasking have stoked an explosion in audiobooks. Publishers, spotting a juggernaut, are expanding their offerings and enlisting star narrators."

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How surveys can help you understand your news audience

You want your audience to engage with your news product: read it, value it, think about it, talk about it, share it, return to it and trust it.

So you have to understand your audience's behaviors, needs and motivations to create stories and products that are valuable and engaging. The deepest, most accurate understanding of your audience comes from quantitative and qualitative research.

Here are the pros and cons of surveys--one of the major methods to gather data about your audience.

PROS

  • Surveys can be anonymous, which is useful for sensitive topics.
  • Surveys allow you to generalize your findings. If you talk to the right sample of people, called a statistically valid random sample, and have a high enough response rate, you can generalize to the entire population. This allows you to make broad statements about a population or group’s likely motivations or behavior. Population trends can be very attractive to advertisers and for big programming or content-related decisions.
  • Surveys are pretty easy to implement online, making data easy to collect and analyze quickly.
  • Surveys are easily repeatable. That means you can test changes in the audience across time.

CONS

  • Online surveys are not always representative of the entire population. This is especially true if some members of your potential audience do not have or regularly use email.
  • Doing surveys right takes time. You need to carefully craft questions to ensure they are high-quality, valid and reliable. Have friends and family take the survey to make sure it makes sense.
  • Surveys are good for trends but not good for rich detail because you have a limited ability to probe. You will not understand the narrative of someone’s media use simply because he or she took your survey.
  • Surveys can be costly. You may have to buy a list of respondents or hire someone to implement your survey.

Taken from Understanding Audiences and Their Behavior, a self-directed course by Rachel Davis Mersey at Poynter NewsU.

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