Intro | Previous finding

The Internet has changed the way U.S. journalists do their work. More than 8 in 10 now say that at least once a week they use the Web to keep up with the news by reading the sites of other news organizations, get background information for stories from the Web or computer databases such as Lexis-Nexis, and search for or receive press releases via e-mail or the Web. About three-fourths say that at least once a week they communicate via e-mail with readers, viewers, or listeners, and check facts in a story using the Web or computer databases. About half search for story ideas from the Web or Internet discussion lists at least weekly, and about one-third use the Web to download raw data from computer databases. Only two uses in the survey received a low response: 14 percent said they interview sources via e-mail at least weekly, and only 13 percent said they use statistical programs to analyze data.

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Intro | Previous finding