FiveThirtyEight
FiveThirtyEight.com founder and New York Times staffer Nate Silver delivered the Henry Pringle Lecture to Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism graduates last week. He told them:

* Read everything, including academic papers, which Silver says many journalists miss. Some 
academics 
don't 
know
 how
 to
 write,
 but 
a 
few
 of 
them 
do,
 and 
there's
 a 
lot 
of 
wisdom 
there
 once 
you 
get
 used
 to 
parsing
 through 
the language.
"

* Learn 
how
 to 
be
 entrepreneurial. It's
 important 
to
 develop 
a 
sense
 of
 yourself
 as 
a
 brand
‐‐
don't 
let
 yourself
 become
 defined
 too 
narrowly
 because 
that
 will 
limit
 your
 opportunities 
as
 your 
career
 evolves.
"

* Learn how to make an argument. "
The 
reader
 is
 going
 to
 be 
asking
 you
 to
 develop a hypothesis, weigh the evid
ence, and come to some conclusion about it -- it's really very much analogous to the scientific method. Good journalism has always done this -- but now it needs to be done more explicitly."

* Learn how to work with data and statistics. "Statistics, to anyone who knows anything about them, aren't factoids -- 4 out of 5 dentists agree that Colgate is the best toothpaste, Uganda is the 118th most populous country -- but instead quanta of information that can be pieced together, just like all the other information that you collect as a journalist, to help you write stories and inform others about the world.

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