Rasmussen Reports
Rasmussen Reports, in a telephone survey conducted earlier this week, found that male voters are more skeptical than women voters of reporters' integrity and also feel more strongly that the average reporter is more liberal than they are. Younger voters are less likely then their elders to think reporters are more liberal. More findings:

* 67 percent of likely voters believe that most reporters, when covering a politician campaign, try to help the candidate they want to win; 21 percent think most reporters put the emphasis instead on trying to offer unbiased coverage. Twelve percent aren't sure.

* 48 percent believe that most reporters would hide any damaging information they learned to help the candidate they wanted to win. Twenty-nine percent disagree and 23 percent aren't sure.

* 46 percent of voters feel that the average reporter is more liberal than they are. Eighteen percent say the average reporter is more conservative than they are, while 22 percent think their views are about the same. Fourteen percent are undecided.

* 78 percent of political conservatives think the average reporter is more liberal than they are. Among liberals, 38 percent think the average reporter is more conservative than they are, while 31 percent believe their views are about the same.

The Washington Post's Jason Horowitz wrote about the Rasmussen Reports founder last June:

A co-founder of the sports network ESPN and former play-by-play broadcaster, Scott Rasmussen is an articulate and frequent guest on Fox News and other outlets, where his nominally nonpartisan data is often cited to support Republican talking points. In October, he hired his own communications director to handle the daily deluge of press calls.