• Boston Globe photographer John Tlumacki took the instantly iconic shot of Boston police officers reacting to the explosion as a runner lies stunned on the ground. "I stayed with it," he told Time.

I had my computer set up to transmit with a wireless card. The police weren’t necessarily trying to get me out of the area — they were saying there could be another explosion. And that’s what really got to me. They started yellow-taping the area. They didn’t know what was going to happen. ...


I was so shook up about it — I was speechless when I was there [on scene]. My eyes were swelling up behind my camera. We use a camera as a defense but I was shaken when I got back, just scanning the pictures. The other sad part was that I took my shoes off because they were covered in blood from walking on the sidewalk taking pictures.

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• The runner in that photo is Bill Iffrig of Lake Stevens, Wash. “The force from it just turned my whole body to jelly, and I went down,” he told Brian M. Rosenthal of The Seattle Times. He was running his third Boston Marathon, he told The (Everett, Wash.) Herald. Iffrig "walked the last 12 feet or so across the finish line," Bill Sheets reports.

"I ended up second in my division," he said. "After you've run 26 miles you're not going to stop there." His timing chip marked his finish at 4 hours, 3 minutes, 47 seconds.

• Michael Calderone reports on the journalists who ran the marathon, then covered the explosions, among them Washington Post local editor Vernon Loeb, New York Times reporter John Eligon, Jessica Meyers of Politico and Michael Rezendes of the Globe.

Rezendes, a member of the L Street Running Club for the past decade, eventually made his way to the club for what traditionally had been a “very festive” post-race gathering. Rezendes borrowed a pen and found some spare paper to interview one woman who saw a man's leg blown off and another woman who crossed the finish line just as the bombs exploded. Rezendes then headed back to the Globe’s newsroom to file his story.

Here are some of today's front pages:

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Previously: Covering what comes next in the aftermath of the blasts | How journalists are covering, reacting to Boston Marathon explosions | BostonGlobe.com, other sites drop paywalls following Boston Marathon explosions