— Google has notified The Guardian and BBC that certain articles will no longer appear in European searches, Mark Scott writes at The New York Times Bits blog. A European court ruling allows people "to ask for links to information about themselves to be removed from search results."

— As news organizations fail to take advantage of the surge in mobile ad spending, Poynter's Rick Edmonds says his hunch "is that getting video right and getting stronger mobile ad performance will go hand in hand for news sites."

— Facebook drives 25 percent of traffic to Hearst magazines, up from 4 percent last year. Lucia Moses explains the publisher's new focus on Facebook at Digiday.

— Vice Media will move to a larger Brooklyn headquarters, Laura Kusisto reports in The Wall Street Journal. The company's $6.5 million in state tax credits will be tied to the creation of 525 new jobs in the next five years.

— Slate's Will Oremus takes Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg to task for a "non-apology apology" that's "as incoherent as it is disingenuous." Sandberg said the company's emotion-manipulation study was "poorly communicated."