If you spent any part of Monday checking SCOTUSblog for the Supreme Court orders, you're not alone -- about 10,000 people were on its live blog around 10 a.m., Editor Amy Howe wrote.

But SCOTUSblog's indispensibility has not yet translated into a credential to cover the court. The Senate Press Gallery granted it a credential -- usually a prerequisite for Supreme Court credentials -- but it later revoked the credential. SCOTUSblog's appeal has failed:

Earlier Monday, SCOTUSblog Publisher Tom Goldstein said he hadn't had a chance yet to read the decision: "Ironically, we’re covering orders and opinions from the Court," he wrote in an email to Poynter. Since then he was able to spend some time with it: The problem, he writes, was not SCOTUSblog's journalism but his dual role as publisher and proprietor of a law firm that argues before the court.

"The members of the Standing Committee are traditional journalists who come from a proud and treasured tradition of complete independence from anything other than their craft," he writes. "That is a fantastic model for journalism. But it is not the only one."

SCOTUSblog will appeal the decision to the Senate Rules Committee, Goldstein writes.

Related: Siobhan Hughes: "while the media are ever evolving and changing, the need to guard against conflicts of interest remains." (Senate Press Gallery) | SCOTUSblog can’t get credentialed, but news agencies owned by foreign states can