This year, editors at The Boston Globe noticed that they shared something important with Hollywood's biggest night: three directors, all trained at nearby Harvard University, each got Oscar nods for documentary filmmaking.

That got the paper's attention. Globe editors had known for awhile that New England was a hotbed for documentarians, with big names like Ken Burns and Errol Morris calling the region home. The arts staff, under film editor Janice Page, had long discussed expanding the paper's coverage of documentary filmmaking; now they had a newspeg.

Now, a few months later, The Boston Globe is rolling out a red carpet of its own for the region's filmmakers and cinephiles. On Thursday, the paper announced GlobeDocs, a bid to celebrate the city's nonfiction film scene. The initiative, headed up by Page, will include a series of free screenings (at least one every month) at independent theaters throughout Boston that will include panel discussions with filmmakers and industry experts. The paper is currently working to identify advertisers to sponsor the screenings, said Boston Globe CEO Mike Sheehan.

In an effort to become a hub for the film community, The Globe is also planning to put on a film festival sometime in 2015 and has begun a fund "to support up-and-coming filmmakers," according to a release announcing GlobeDocs.

In the weeks leading up to Thursday's announcement, the paper was already beefing up its documentary coverage. Earlier this month, The Globe began devoting a full page of its Sunday arts section to nonfiction film. The paper brought aboard Peter Keough, the former film editor of the now-defunct Boston Phoenix, to anchor the section; he writes a weekly roundup of the region's documentary news called "Doc Talk" and asks a prominent movie-lover for recommendations in a feature called "Documania."

Close watchers of The Globe will notice this isn't the first time the paper has invested in specialized coverage of the city. This year, the paper rolled out two standalone sites — BetaBoston and Crux — to chronicle the startup and Catholic communities, respectively. In June, the paper added a Friday print section, "Capital," dedicated exclusively to politics coverage. And there will likely be more specialized verticals to follow, Sheehan said.

The homepage of Crux, The Boston Globe's new vertical for Catholic news.
The homepage of Crux, The Boston Globe's new vertical for Catholic news.

And as with the other new initiatives, The Globe is planning to kick off GlobeDocs with a live event — in this case, a screening of "The Irish Pub," featuring a discussion with director Alex Fegan moderated by Globe columnist Kevin Cullen. This echoes other launch events held for verticals like Crux and Capital.

The business thinking behind these live meetups — from next year's film festival to events the paper's has been putting on for years — is to position The Globe to become a convener of the community in addition to its chronicler, Sheehan said. The events, which build and showcase the verticals' respective audiences, have the potential to indirectly drive revenue by making them more attractive to advertisers.

“Newspapers were traditionally experienced in someone’s hand, something someone read," Sheehan said. "At their best today, newspapers are something that bring people together.”