mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Zakaria plagiarized in TV show, critics say: Mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort tell Poynter they will have another post on Our Bad Media later this morning outlining what they say are examples of Fareed Zakaria lifting text, this time for his CNN show, "GPS." Here's a video that will accompany the piece.

    @blippoblappo and @crushingbort's last post, in August, outlined suspect passages in Zakaria's 2008 book, "The Post-American World" and in stories in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs. Neither W.W. Norton, which published the book, Newsweek, Foreign Affairs nor Atlantic Media, where Zakaria is now a contributing editor, replied to Poynter's requests for comment.

  2. Foley family describes frustrations with U.S. government: The FBI first told James Foley's family they'd be prosecuted if they paid ransom to his captors, then advised them prosecution would be unlikely, Rukmini Callimachi reports. "Once the family made it clear they wanted to pay, the bureau instructed them to stall, according to a consultant working on the hostage crisis." (NYT) | "A policy against paying ransoms makes sense — but making the family of a captured journalist feel like criminals does not." (Vox) | “It was very upsetting because we were essentially told to trust… that the way they were handling things would bring our son home,” Foley's mother, Diane Foley, said last week. (ABC News) | The family's new fund "will push for the discussion, development and coordination of policies that are consistent, transparent, and accountable to all American citizens held captive world-wide." (James W. Foley Legacy Fund)
  3. RCFP hires a litigation director: Katie Townsend will help the organization sue those who impede newsgathering. (CJR) | "The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) filed an application on Friday with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg challenging current UK legislation on mass surveillance and its threat to journalism." (Index on Censorship)
  4. Free cops for Fox News honcho: "According to police records obtained by Gawker, the Cresskill [New Jersey] Police Department supplies 24/7 security to [Roger] Ailes’ residence there—apparently at no cost to Ailes himself—and otherwise delivers on-demand police services to his family, regardless of whether or not they are in any obvious danger." (Gawker)
  5. Julian Assange did a chat on Gawker: "Opinion polling from the US just two months ago shows that WikiLeaks has majority support of people under the age of 40," Assange told PootMcFruitcakes in the chat. (Gawker) | “Pale nerd king," "seed-spilling sex creep," “Real-life The Matrix extra”: Abby Ohlheiser on Gawker's history of describing Assange. (WP)
  6. What newspapers can do: They have to offer "engaging and worthwhile material," Rem Rieder writes, conveying API chief's Tom Rosenstiel's speech at the ASNE convention Monday. "They certainly are not going to out BuzzFeed BuzzFeed at the clickbait game." (USA Today) | Alexander Nazaryan: Journalism might not be saved, but "it isn’t quite as doomed as we thought several years ago." (Newsweek)
  7. Let's talk about native ads: California Sunday Magazine, which plans a launch next month, will feature “story advertising" -- “We are doing one series of story advertising with Nest that feels like a gallery exhibit with prominent illustrators and artists and what home means to them," Chas Edwards tells Kara Swisher. “But we are also making sure we are very transparent.” (Re/code) | Josh Benton: "Why is native advertising so appealing to publishers? Let’s start with the obvious: money. You may have heard that a lot of news companies are in need of it." (Nieman) | The New York Times Monday published the second of four planned native ads on Mashable. The first was called “11 Inspiring Videos That Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity." (Poynter)
  8. No comment from the bespokesperson?: The New York Times used the word bespoke "more than any other US publication in the past three months, according to a Nexis search, with “bespoke” appearing nearly three dozen times, excluding in proper names." (CJR)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: The Buenos Aires Herald fronts a photo of a man who signals his support of Scottish independence with a complicated hairstyle. (Courtesy the Newseum)


  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ryan Nobles is now a national correspondent for CNN. Previously, he was an anchor and reporter for WWBT in Richmond, Virginia. (CNN) | Preetma Singh has been named market director for Nylon. Formerly, she was market editor at WSJ Magazine. She's also the drummer for Vomitface. (Email) | Danielle Jones has been named executive vice president for expansion at Politico. Previously, she was deputy editor-in-chief there. Miki King has been named executive vice president for operations at Politico. Previously, she was senior vice president of business development there. (Politico) | Carol Morello will be a diplomatic correspondent at The Washington Post. She covers the census and demographics there. (The Washington Post) | Theodore Kim is now a homepage editor at The New York Times. Previously, he was a mobile and tablet editor at The Washington Post. (Sched) | Marin Cogan will be a contributing editor at New York Magazine. She's a writer-at-large for the National Journal. (Politico) | Tim Evans will be a consumer advocate for The Indianapolis Star. Previously, he was a court reporter there. (@starwatchtim) | Les Zaitz has been named investigations editor at The Oregonian. He is a senior investigative reporter there. (Email) | Job of the day: The San Jose Mercury News is looking for a Silicon Valley reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves:

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