Good morning.

  1. He straddled financial glory days and a great downturn
    John Carroll was one of the best-regarded newspaper editors of his era at the Herald in Lexington, Kentucky, the Baltimore Sun and Los Angeles Times. He ran A-list operations before and during the stunning industry decline. He was known for shepherding prize winning journalism, engaging in battles over resources with Tribune Co. after its purchase of the Los Angeles paper and for former Sun reporter David Simon's unflattering portrayal of him on "The Wire," Simon's great HBO series on crime in Baltimore. (Washington Post)

    But an image of prize-driven editor was a minority view, as underscored Sunday by New York Times Editor Dean Baquet, who succeeded Carroll in Los Angeles: "He believed big newspapers should take on the biggest subjects. Bad hospitals. Bad airplanes. International slavery. Nothing was too ambitious for John’s newsrooms.” (The New York Times, Kentucky.com, Los Angeles Times, Baltimore Sun)

  2. Journalists treated 'like cattle through a livestock chute' at Hillary Clinton announcement
    Clinton's substantively predictable Saturday campaign announcement speech included the similarly predictable segregation of the media horde. (National Review) Self-humiliation may be the order of many days while following her very controlled campaign. Meanwhile, her interview drought ended as she deigned to sit with two Iowa journalists. (CNN)
  3. Glenn Greenwald pillories Times of London on Snowden 'betrayals'
    The Sunday Times of London said that British intelligence was shafted by Edward Snowden disclosures, compromising British spies dealing with Russia and China. Glenn Greenwald, who assisted Snowden in leaking confidential documents and data, calls "the entire report a self-negating joke." (The Intercept)
  4. Tweet this: Saudi prince doesn’t like Twitter choice of interim new boss
    The Saudi prince who owns a roughly 5 percent stake in Twitter is not big on Jack Dorsey succeeding departing Dick Costolo, the serial tech entrepreneur and onetime improvisational comic. Or at least now he doesn't. He first said he liked the guy (Bloomberg), but now supposedly turns thumbs down. (Financial Times)
  5. Lady Gaga, imagine how many journalists are jailed around you
    The inaugural European Games are underway in Baku, Azerbaijan with about 1,300 journalists on the scene. Lady Gaga starred at the splashy opening ceremony by singing, "Imagine" by John Lennon. (RT) You may think I'm a dreamer but it might have been nice to note that the nation also happens to be "the leading jailer of journalists in Europe and Central Asia. (CPJ).
  6. Philly labor talks resume Thursday
    There's no apparent progress in ongoing talks between the Newspaper Guild and management representing the Inquirer, Daily News and Philly.com. Bill Ross, head of the guild, tells Poynter talks will resume Thursday. A deadline is June. 27. Members have given Ross authorization to call a walkout of there's no progress when the deadline passes. (Philly.com)
  7. Jake Tapper to moderate CNN GOP debate
    During his inaugural and hopefully change-inducing hosting of CNN's Sunday "State of the Union," Tapper announced he'll oversee a Sept. 16 CNN debate among Republican presidential candidates at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in California. It should be a large contingent by then. (Adweek)
  8. New Jersey paper, prosecutor swipe over murder trial witness
    The Trentonian and a New Jersey prosecutor used the paper's letters section to feud over whether a key witness in a murder trial himself was the subject of a murder attempt before testifying. (The Trentonian)

  9. Release names of those arrested for incest?
    The managing editor of a Colorado daily is not happy that other media released names of those arrested for incest or incest-related crimes. He explained why and then asked readers what they think. (Pueblo Chieftain)

  10. Jason Rezaian trial may (or may not) resume
    It's closed so even his family couldn't be sure if a third session at the Revolutionary Court was taking place Monday after a long apparent delay. On Saturday Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said he's following the "espionage" case. Anybody have his cell phone number? (Washington Post)

  11. Front page of the day, curated by Seth Liss with its effective use of key information over an effective X-ray image.
    on-the-hook (Courtesy the Newseum)
     
  12. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin
    Jason Whitlock is no longer leading "The Undefeated." He was slated to be its founder. Leon Carter will be the interim head of "The Undefeated." He is vice president and editorial director there. (Poynter) | Whitney Vargas is now executive editor at T. Previously, she was deputy editor there. Hanya Yanagihara is now deputy editor of T. Previously, Yanagihara was an editor-at-large at Condé Nast Traveler. Emily Stokes is now articles editor at T. Previously, she was senior features editor there. Isabel Wilkinson is now senior online editor at T. Previously, she was senior editor at The Cut. Hannah Goldfield is now a staff editor at T. Previously, she was an associate editor for NewYorker.com. (Poynter) | Jason Taylor is now president and publisher of the Las Vegas Review-Journal. Previously, he was president and publisher of The (Jackson, Mississippi) Clarion-Ledger. (The Associated Press) | Job of the day: TPM is looking for a reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)
    Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Corrections? Tips? Please email me: jwarren@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here.

Correction: A previous version of this story misspelled Jake Tapper's name.