Last Friday, The Denver Post reported it was considering relocating the newsroom from its downtown Denver home to one in nearby Adams County, where the Post's printing facility is located.

On Tuesday, Michael Roberts reported for Westword that the decision has already been made. Publisher Mac Tully confirmed the news in a statement, noting that they plan to keep some kind of office space downtown:

I can confirm that The Denver Post will move the majority of its news and advertising staff to our offices on Washington Street. While we would like to stay in our current building, the move offers a considerable cost savings during this difficult period in the newspaper industry and allows us to keep the most important part of our content generating resources in the newsroom and advertising: the people.

The move means that Denver, which until 2009 was a two-newspaper town, will no longer have a major metro daily headquartered within its city limits.

The Post isn't the first legacy newsroom to leave its downtown headquarters. The Miami Herald left its home on Biscayne Bay for the suburbs of Doral in 2013.

Other newspapers have left their iconic buildings for newer (and smaller) ones just down the street, including the Philadelphia Inquirer, The Washington Post, The Wichita Eagle and the Minneapolis Star Tribune. The Dallas Morning News will soon move from its iconic downtown building, known as "The Rock of Truth," to another space downtown.

The Post is a Digital First Media newspaper. That company recently cut staff at its Bay Area News Group, including at the 2017-Pulitzer-Prize-winning the Pulitzer Prize-winning East Bay Times.

Earlier this year in Denver, Denverite merged with Billy Penn parent company Spirited Media. The company aims to provide the city's residents with engaging, mobile-first news.