In Case You Missed It

Min Caysey Welton

Inside The New York Times Magazine

"I'm genuinely proud of everything we've done over the past couple years, but things really kicked into gear after the relaunch of the magazine back in February 2015."

Politico Hadas Gold and Ken Vogel

Corey Lewandowski loses book deal

The former Donald Trump campaign manager "had a $1.2-million offer from HarperCollins to write a book chronicling his time running Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, but the publishing giant backed away from the deal amid concerns about Lewandowski’s nondisclosure agreement, according to two sources familiar with the talks."

USA Today Alicia Shepard

Opinion: "Hiring Corey Lewandowski was a smart move"

"He wasn’t hired because he’s a journalist who will provide a balanced perspective or because he’s a nice guy. He was hired because he spent 18 months deep inside one of the oddest, groundbreaking campaigns in modern history and he knows better than most how Trump thinks and what he’s likely to do next."

Politico Europe Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch: Brexit was like a "prison break"

"Rupert Murdoch described Britain’s vote to leave the European Union as 'like a prison break' and warned Boris Johnson that he will face a 'bloody revolt' if he backtracks on the referendum result, according to tweets by a reporter at his Times newspaper on Tuesday."

Nieman Lab Shan Wang

What is First Look Media building, anyway?

"...Another big new platform (and brand) is in the works, though details are still scarce. First Look Media announced back in March that it was hiring Anna Holmes — previously editorial director of Fusion and the founding editor of Jezebel — in a “senior editorial role” to build a new media property, launching this fall. "

CNN Money Tom Kludt

Sumner Redstone pushes back against Philippe Dauman (again)

"Needless to say, these highly personal and vicious attacks on Sumner's capacity and Shari's honesty and integrity are offensive and unacceptable."

Nieman Lab LAURA HAZARD OWEN

How can The Washington Post cut its budget by 50 percent?

"Bezos reportedly told staffers at a recent meeting that “the company’s annual budget, currently around $500 million, will have to be cut by 50 percent over the next three years,” though the paper denied this to Sherman."

Columbia Journalism Review Ann Telnaes

Social media is silencing cartoonists

The Washington Post cartoonist faced harassment on social media after she drew a cartoon suggesting Ted Cruz was using his children for political gain. She thinks she's not alone, and that the criticism has a chilling effect on cartooning in general.

Digiday Jessica Davies

By dropping its paywall, the FT earned thousands of subscriptions

"...People did not simply pillage its content for free and then leave over the weekend. They bought subscriptions."

Digiday Sahil Patel

Refinery29 is building a 10-person Facebook Live team

"Refinery29 publishes 15 live videos per week across its eight Facebook pages, including the main page as well as targeted sub-communities such as Short Cuts (for beauty tutorials) and Refinery29 Wellness."

The Seattle Times Lewis Kamb and Jessica Lee

Don Shelton named sports editor at The Seattle Times

Shelton, who has a 40-year career in journalism, was previously sports editor there.

The Washington Post Margaret Sullivan

An argument against hiring Corey Lewandowski, Trump's ex-aide

"Bringing Lewandowski on board is an astonishing reward for behavior that should cause him to be shunned by respectable journalistic organizations."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

Attorney in Trump defamation case: 'Donald Trump, a shrill critic of our nation’s First Amendment rights, now cowers behind those very rights'

The attorney for pundit Cheri Jacobus found some irony in Trump's First Amendment defense in a case alleging damages from his negative tweets about Jacobus.

Nieman Lab NICHOLAS QUAH

Podcasting in the U.K.

"The UK’s underdeveloped podcast consumption levels also appear to be matched by a similarly immature podcast advertising market."

Digiday Jordan Valinsky

How a copy editor at the New Yorker became the star of a web series

Mary Norris didn't mean to become a web star, but "she’s a super duper copy editor, she’s very funny and extremely smart about language,” said the New Yorker's editor-in-chief David Remnick.

In case you missed it

Min Caysey Welton

Inside The New York Times Magazine

"I'm genuinely proud of everything we've done over the past couple years, but things really kicked into gear after the relaunch of the magazine back in February 2015."

Politico Hadas Gold and Ken Vogel

Corey Lewandowski loses book deal

The former Donald Trump campaign manager "had a $1.2-million offer from HarperCollins to write a book chronicling his time running Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, but the publishing giant backed away from the deal amid concerns about Lewandowski’s nondisclosure agreement, according to two sources familiar with the talks."

USA Today Alicia Shepard

Opinion: "Hiring Corey Lewandowski was a smart move"

"He wasn’t hired because he’s a journalist who will provide a balanced perspective or because he’s a nice guy. He was hired because he spent 18 months deep inside one of the oddest, groundbreaking campaigns in modern history and he knows better than most how Trump thinks and what he’s likely to do next."

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Coffee Break Course

A two-minute course from News University

How to identify a “push poll”

It happens  every election cycle. You’ll get a call that sounds like a political poll but is really a campaign tactic. Some calls are “push polls,” political telemarketing that attempts to create negative views of candidates or issues. Others are legitimate message-testing surveys, used by campaigns to see which types of messages will be most successful.

Here’s how you can tell the difference.

Push polls

  • Often ask only one or very few questions, all about a single candidate or a single issue
  • Usually ask questions that are strongly negative (or sometimes uniformly positive) describing the candidate or the issue
  • May not name the organization conducting the calls, or sometimes use a phony name
  • Do not ask for demographic information
  • Can give evasive answers when you ask for information about the survey
  • Usually call very large numbers of people, sometimes many thousands
  • Do not use a random sample
  • Rarely, if ever, report results

Message testing

  • Usually based on a random sample of voters
  • The number of calls is within the range of legitimate surveys, typically between 400 and 1,500 interviews
  • Usually contains more than a few questions, including demographic data
  • Will often share results on request

Taken from Understanding and Interpreting Polls (International), a self-directed course at Poynter NewsU, developed in partnership with the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR), the World Association for Social, Opinion and Market Research (ESOMAR) and the World Association for Public Opinion Research (WAPOR).

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Since its founding in 1975, The Poynter Institute has had one goal: to elevate journalism. More than 40 years later, our role in strengthening democracy has never been more important.

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