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In Case You Missed It

The Washington Post Donald Trump

President Trump publishes an op-ed in The Washington Post

He says he got a lot done in his first 100 days.

Politico HADAS GOLD

At 11 p.m., White House correspondents' chief can finally relax

"Saturday dinner culminates a challenging year for Jeff Mason, the soft-spoken head of the White House Correspondents’ Association."

HuffPost Carla Herreria

New York Times readers are canceling subscriptions over climate-denying writer

"The @NYTimes hiring of climate denier didn't lead me to cancel subscription. Public editor's offensive response did."

The New York Times ELIZABETH WILLIAMSON

A call for a less glitzy White House Correspondents' Association dinner

"President Trump’s decision to skip the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner on Saturday is one of the few good turns he has done for the Washington press corps since he arrived."

BuzzFeed News Adrian Carrasquillo and Steven Perlberg

Donald Trump is trying to set the Washington media up for a big self-own

"'Score one for the counter programmer in chief. It's unfortunate that we can't set pens and political swords aside for a single night,' said one CNN executive of Trump's rally up against the White House Correspondents' Dinner."

The Washington Post Erik Wemple

NYT: Climate change impact is happening now. NYT: Eh, maybe not that big a deal.

"To establish the disagreement between the op-ed and news pages of the New York Times: The former, via Stephens, discusses the 'possible severity of [climate change’s] consequences.' The latter has already documented the severity of climate change’s consequences."

New York Yashar Ali

Host Hugh Hewitt is in talks for an MSNBC show

"Hewitt is already part of the NBC News family as a paid commentator, but the fact that he’s on the verge of getting his own program is alarming to some staffers at MSNBC."

Politico Magazine Uncredited

Politico's annual survey of the White House press corps is here

"While 68 percent of [the White House press corps] think Trump is the most openly anti-press president in U.S. history, 75 percent said they see Trump’s attacks against the media as more of a distraction than a threat."

The New York Times AZAM AHMED

In Mexico, 'It’s easy to kill a journalist'

"Mexico is one of the worst countries in the world to be a journalist today. At least 104 journalists have been murdered in this country since 2000, while 25 others have disappeared, presumed dead."

Memphis Flyer CHRIS DAVIS

Gannett stalls severance payments to former Commercial Appeal employees

"In advertising, Gannett fired everyone and made them reapply for new jobs. We call this process The Hunger Games."

The New York Times Uncredited

NYT White House reporters recall their most vivid memories of Trump's first 100 days

"Covering the Trump White House can be exhilarating, maddening, exhausting — but never boring. The New York Times’s White House correspondents recall memorable moments from their first 100 days on the beat."

The Hollywood Reporter Marisa Guthrie

The Murdochs are reportedly considering replacing Fox News boss Bill Shine

"The company has quietly put out feelers for a possible new head of Fox News with the preference, say sources, that it be a woman."

The New York Times Bret Stephens

Bret Stephens first New York Times column is a defense of climate change skepticism

“But what’s to be said about 75 percent right? Wise people say this is suspicious. Well, and what about 100 percent right? Whoever says he’s 100 percent right is a fanatic, a thug, and the worst kind of rascal."

Society of Professional Journalists Michael Koretzky

Fox News fails to credit student newspaper for reporting

"Here’s how the journalism food chain works these days — with cable news as sharks and college journalists as plankton."

BuzzFeed Craig Silverman

5 ways scammers exploit Facebook to feed you false information

"Facebook's security team yesterday released a white paper that outlines some of the techniques that malicious people and entities use to manipulate information on the platform."

In case you missed it

The Washington Post Donald Trump

President Trump publishes an op-ed in The Washington Post

He says he got a lot done in his first 100 days.

Politico HADAS GOLD

At 11 p.m., White House correspondents' chief can finally relax

"Saturday dinner culminates a challenging year for Jeff Mason, the soft-spoken head of the White House Correspondents’ Association."

HuffPost Carla Herreria

New York Times readers are canceling subscriptions over climate-denying writer

"The @NYTimes hiring of climate denier didn't lead me to cancel subscription. Public editor's offensive response did."

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