In Case You Missed It

Digiday Sahil Patel

ABC News and Facebook's live GOP convention coverage nets 11.5 million views

"Facebook made a big bet on providing live coverage of the 2016 presidential conventions. And at least with ABC News, Facebook’s official live streaming partner for the events, the bet seems to have paid off."

Digiday Lucia Moses

What PR people hate about reporters

"Refusing to correct a clear error. A reporter for a national newspaper wrote a story that he’s acknowledged was based on a false anonymous tip, but despite his acknowledgement that the story is entirely false, he’s refused to run a correction."

The New York Times Liz Spayd

How The New York Times handles courtesy titles

Why The Times calls Michelle Obama "Mrs." and Melania Trump "Ms."

Digiday Brian Morrissey

How Quartz focuses its newsroom

“'Some resource constraint is a really good thing,” [Publisher Jay] Lauf said. 'It makes you focus on what do you want to be, what are your priorities and how to execute against those priorities."'

Ad Age Jeremy Barr

Financial Times gets creative with ad-blocker blocking

"On Wednesday, the newspaper began blanking out, for some users, a percentage of words in articles symbolizing the percentage of the company's revenue that comes from advertising."

JOSH GERSTEIN Politico

Matthew Keys denied appeal

"The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals issued an order Thursday denying former Reuters social media editor Matthew Keys' plea to remain free while he appeals his convictions."

Reuters JESSICA TOONKEL

Al Jazeera to launch English language digital streaming service in U.S.

"Al Jazeera Media Network is preparing to make its English language international news channel video content digitally available to U.S. viewers again, according to a July 21 email sent to employees obtained by Reuters."

Nieman Lab Ken Doctor

What really ails Fox News, the leader in its shrinking category

"That aging out of its core audience is its longer-term problem. It’s been masked for cable news in this Trumpinated election cycle that has sent ratings way up for everyone."

Spokesman-Review Rob Curley

Rob Curley named editor at the Spokesman-Review

"Curley worked most recently at the Orange County Register and previously worked at the Las Vegas Sun and The Washington Post."

The Washington Post Lazaro Gamio and Callum Borchers

A visual history of Donald Trump dominating the news cycle

"Among the biggest differences between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton has been how they handle the press: both to their advantage and disadvantage."

Mediaite Dan Abrams

Mediaite is expanding into food, sports and entertainment coverage

"We have also just hired our first social media director, our previously small staff led by Jon Nicosia and Rachel Stockman will now be 50% larger than it has been in past years."

New York Gabriel Sherman

Why is Fox News keeping quiet on Roger Ailes?

"[Irena] Briganti — who is feared both inside and outside Fox as Ailes’s public-relations enforcer — has been told by 21st Century Fox executives that she is not allowed to communicate with Ailes or the press about his status at the network."

Atlas Obscura Uncredited

Atlas Obscura launches a podcast

"We're thrilled to bring you the first episode of Escape Plan, a road trip podcast from Atlas Obscura and Zipcar. We've been yearning to do a podcast for a long time. In Escape Plan, we hope we've created a show that captures Atlas's love of curiosity and exploration."

Nieman Lab Ricardo Bilton

The Washington Post's Medium strategy

"Here’s a simple tip for publishers looking looking to attract readers on Medium: Start with what already works on the platform (first-person stories), and avoid what doesn’t (straight news)."

Longform Max Linsky

David Remnick: "I won't cheat The New Yorker"

“I think it’s important — not just for me, but for the readers — that this thing exists at the highest possible level in 2016, in 2017, and on. That there’s a continuity to it.

In case you missed it

Digiday Sahil Patel

ABC News and Facebook's live GOP convention coverage nets 11.5 million views

"Facebook made a big bet on providing live coverage of the 2016 presidential conventions. And at least with ABC News, Facebook’s official live streaming partner for the events, the bet seems to have paid off."

Digiday Lucia Moses

What PR people hate about reporters

"Refusing to correct a clear error. A reporter for a national newspaper wrote a story that he’s acknowledged was based on a false anonymous tip, but despite his acknowledgement that the story is entirely false, he’s refused to run a correction."

The New York Times Liz Spayd

How The New York Times handles courtesy titles

Why The Times calls Michelle Obama "Mrs." and Melania Trump "Ms."

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How surveys can help you understand your news audience

You want your audience to engage with your news product: read it, value it, think about it, talk about it, share it, return to it and trust it.

So you have to understand your audience's behaviors, needs and motivations to create stories and products that are valuable and engaging. The deepest, most accurate understanding of your audience comes from quantitative and qualitative research.

Here are the pros and cons of surveys--one of the major methods to gather data about your audience.

PROS

  • Surveys can be anonymous, which is useful for sensitive topics.
  • Surveys allow you to generalize your findings. If you talk to the right sample of people, called a statistically valid random sample, and have a high enough response rate, you can generalize to the entire population. This allows you to make broad statements about a population or group’s likely motivations or behavior. Population trends can be very attractive to advertisers and for big programming or content-related decisions.
  • Surveys are pretty easy to implement online, making data easy to collect and analyze quickly.
  • Surveys are easily repeatable. That means you can test changes in the audience across time.

CONS

  • Online surveys are not always representative of the entire population. This is especially true if some members of your potential audience do not have or regularly use email.
  • Doing surveys right takes time. You need to carefully craft questions to ensure they are high-quality, valid and reliable. Have friends and family take the survey to make sure it makes sense.
  • Surveys are good for trends but not good for rich detail because you have a limited ability to probe. You will not understand the narrative of someone’s media use simply because he or she took your survey.
  • Surveys can be costly. You may have to buy a list of respondents or hire someone to implement your survey.

Taken from Understanding Audiences and Their Behavior, a self-directed course by Rachel Davis Mersey at Poynter NewsU.

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