In Case You Missed It

The Hollywood Reporter Michael Wolff

Coverage of Brexit vote is evidence of a disconnect between news organizations and their audiences

"The result of the referendum vote is a lesson that, one can only hope, gives pause to the Hillary Clinton campaign."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

Mississippi Today wants to be just like the Texas Tribune

"Mississippi Today, a nonprofit site that launched in May, is trying to bring more muscle to the coverage of government and politics in the state."

PETER KAFKA Recode

Americans still watch a boatload of TV

"The average American watches an astonishing 4.5 hours of TV a day, according to a new report from Nielsen. Add in DVR time, and that number gets up to 5 hours a day."

The Washington Post Paul Farhi

CNN staffers are just fine with Corey Lewandowski's hire

"CNN’s own journalists...express guarded optimism that Lewandowski could be an asset to the network’s campaign coverage."

RICARDO BILTON Nieman Lab

A European privacy advocate plans his attack against anti-ad blockers

"The amount of ire and vitriol that has been thrown my way over the past four or five months is a very clear indication that [publishers are] absolutely terrified…If they want my advice on how to do it legally, they can pay me for it."

The New York Times Press

New York Times collaborates with "diversity recruitment platform"

"More than 65 members of the Jopwell community – specifically Black, Latino/Hispanic, and Native American summer interns and recent college graduates based in New York City – visited The Times."

POLITICO Hadas Gold

Supreme Court veteran departs

"Lyle Denniston, dean of the Supreme Court press corps, is leaving SCOTUSblog to join the National Constitution Center, the center announced over the weekend."

Columbia Journalism Review David Uberti

BuzzFeed to social platforms: More transparency, please

BuzzFeed boss Ben Smith and lawyer Nabiha Syed want social platforms to be more transparent about why they choose to block and ban users.

The New York Times Jim Rutenberg

At Cannes, advertisers are privately at odds with Facebook

The New York Times media columnist took the pulse of the advertising community while visiting the posh Cannes Lions International Festival. No surprise: its relationship with Facebook is strained.

CNN Brian Stelter

Discontent, but no revolt, brewing over CNN's decision to hire Trump aide

Some employees at CNN aren't thrilled that the company hired Donald Trump's famously press-averse campaign manager, but reporting shows they're not planning an out-an-out revolt, as a New York Post item suggested.

Medium Danny Page

The pitfalls of using Google Trends for reporting

The tool turns up interesting information that shouldn't be used to prove any points definitively, according to the author. "Beware, you can look quite foolish by solely depending on it."

Financial Times The Drum

The decline of scale, cont.

The managing editor of the FT's website is glad he has 587,000 digital-only subscribers. "The advertising model on its own doesn't seem to me one that will sustain the kind of serious quality journalism that we are in the business of providing. We see ad blockers, we see the downturn of display advertising in general.”

CNN Money Brian Stelter

Three news outlets turned away from Trump golf course event

BuzzFeed, The Washington Post and The Guardian were turned away a Donald Trump campaign stop at his golf course in Aberdeen, Scotland. During the event, Trump plugged the course and voiced his support for the UK Brexit vote.

Fox News Chris Wallace

George Will's departure from the GOP

Noted conservative pundit George Will says that Trump's rise, combined with the GOP's refusal to denounce his more extreme polities, prompted the departure. He had a rebuttal ready for Trump, who posted a disparaging tweet. "He has an advantage over me, because he can say everything he knows in 140 characters, and I can't."

The New York Times Michael Cieply

Got $50,000? Go buy yourself an interview

"Forward allows a wealthy person to become the subject of a professionally packaged video interview — conducted with all the panache and most of the perspicuity you would expect from Mr. Rose — for about $50,000 to $150,000, depending on the package."

In case you missed it

The Hollywood Reporter Michael Wolff

Coverage of Brexit vote is evidence of a disconnect between news organizations and their audiences

"The result of the referendum vote is a lesson that, one can only hope, gives pause to the Hillary Clinton campaign."

Nieman Lab JOSEPH LICHTERMAN

Mississippi Today wants to be just like the Texas Tribune

"Mississippi Today, a nonprofit site that launched in May, is trying to bring more muscle to the coverage of government and politics in the state."

PETER KAFKA Recode

Americans still watch a boatload of TV

"The average American watches an astonishing 4.5 hours of TV a day, according to a new report from Nielsen. Add in DVR time, and that number gets up to 5 hours a day."

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3 ways to start reporting on your investigative project

Working on investigative reports? If you are looking at a system — a government program, juvenile courts, corporate regulation — your preparation should include:

  • Reading a report that will provide an overview and explain how the system is supposed to work.
  • Talking to someone who understands the system — a "road-map source." He or she can explain how the system is supposed to work — and point out aspects of the system that do not work.
  • Getting into the field and observing the system operating.

For example, let's say you are looking at government loans that are going to unqualified persons.

  • Find out who, by law and regulation, is eligible for these loans — and who is prohibited from getting them. Start by reading the law or regulations and some reports or audits about the program.
  • Talk with someone who has the authority to authorize this type of loan, someone who has taken out one of these loans or track down an expert who can tell you how the program really works.
  • Find out what the loans are used for, and, if possible, go into the field and see the results.

Taken from Introduction to Investigative Reporting, a self-directed course by Brant Houston at Poynter NewsU.

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