In Case You Missed It

WBFF CHRISTINE BOYNTON

Charges announced against man who threatened Baltimore TV station

The man who made threats and ignited a car fire at a Baltimore TV station faces several charges, including "second degree arson, first degree malicious burning and threat of arson as well as four counts of reckless endangerment and one count of possessing a phony destructive device..."

The Wall Street Journal BYRON TAU

Before the White House Correspondents' Association dinner, a Hollywood teaser

Actress Allison Janney, reprising her role as "The West Wing" White House press secretary C.J. Cregg, took the real podium on Friday. "Ms. Janney as Ms. Cregg took a question from a reporter about whom President Bartlet was supporting in the Democratic primary. 'I think you know the answer to that question,' she said.'"

The Guardian Marjorie Walker

'I have to admit, it was not an easy decision to sue the New York Times...'

"...In recent years I have had a front-row seat to the Times’s new management systematically purging my division (and others) of older employees, people of color and women whose family obligations are viewed as interfering with work."

The Wall Street Journal JACK MARSHALL

Google is experimenting with direct publishing

Google is testing allowing organizations publish directly to Google. Fox News and People.com are among early testers. "Google’s tests of the new posting tool comes at a time when media companies, marketers and organizations of all types are increasingly distributing content by publishing directly to major online platforms, instead of driving users back to their own websites and properties."

The Boston Globe John Hilliard

Uber driver made sexual advances toward reporter

A Boston.com reporter wrote a piece Friday detailing sexual advances an Uber driver made toward her and her experience trying to report it to the company. "In an update posted early Friday afternoon, an Uber spokeswoman said the accused driver is 'no longer active on the platform.'"

The New York Times Benedict Carey

This Is Your Brain on Podcasts

Scientists have scanned the brain activity of podcast listeners. The resulting maps show "widely dispersed sensory, emotional and memory networks were humming, across both hemispheres of the brain."

Nieman Lab Shan Wang

The Wall Street Journal website — paywalled from the very beginning — turns 20 years old today

Nieman Lab looks back to the launch of the Wall Street Journal's website, the strategy behind its almost immediate introduction of a paywall. "Early days feel almost comically inefficient," Nieman Lab says but as of December WSJ had approximately 828,000 digital subscribers.

Bloomberg Sarah Frier

Snapchat to show highlights from 2016 Summer Olympics

Snapchat reached an agreement with Comcast and will be showing videos from the Rio Olympic games in a dedicated channel.

Mother Jones Monika Bauerlein and Clara Jeffery

Pop Goes the Digital Media Bubble

Digital media startups "are better at growing than showing a profit" argue Bauerlein and Jeffery on Mother Jones. In arguing for readers to support MoJo's own nonprofit model, the authors argue that tech companies won't save journalism.

Denver Business Journal Greg Avery

26 jobs on the cutting block at The Denver Post

"Reporter tweets from a Thursday afternoon meeting said the newspaper's management seeks to get 23 union employees in the newsroom to voluntarily leave the paper, plus three non-union employees."

In case you missed it

WBFF CHRISTINE BOYNTON

Charges announced against man who threatened Baltimore TV station

The man who made threats and ignited a car fire at a Baltimore TV station faces several charges, including "second degree arson, first degree malicious burning and threat of arson as well as four counts of reckless endangerment and one count of possessing a phony destructive device..."

The Wall Street Journal BYRON TAU

Before the White House Correspondents' Association dinner, a Hollywood teaser

Actress Allison Janney, reprising her role as "The West Wing" White House press secretary C.J. Cregg, took the real podium on Friday. "Ms. Janney as Ms. Cregg took a question from a reporter about whom President Bartlet was supporting in the Democratic primary. 'I think you know the answer to that question,' she said.'"

The Guardian Marjorie Walker

'I have to admit, it was not an easy decision to sue the New York Times...'

"...In recent years I have had a front-row seat to the Times’s new management systematically purging my division (and others) of older employees, people of color and women whose family obligations are viewed as interfering with work."

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