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  • Anonymous

    SERIOUSLY, RIGHT NOW?! How can anyone blame The AP for saying, “Hey, we reported this first?!” i used to work for a mid-size local daily and I can remember the frustration that came with seeing my originally-reported story being “reported” by the much larger daily, as if the jackwagon reporter at the larger paper had discovered it. He had NOT. he had only availed himself of MY reporting. So, sorry. you two jackwagons, but there is no sour grapes here, simply a call to honesty.