Andrew Beaujon

Andrew Beaujon reports on the media for Poynter Online. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture. He lives in Alexandria, Va., with his family. His email is abeaujon@poynter.org, his phone number is 703-594-1103, and he tweets @abeaujon.


Quote approval isn’t necessary when White House insists on interview minders

The Washington Post | Politico | National Journal

The White House “may be the most diligent user of the chaperoned interview,” Paul Farhi writes in The Washington Post. Though many news organizations banned the practice of quote approval in 2012, the Obama administration makes diligent use of minders during interviews, which can accomplish a similar purpose.

“Let’s put it this way,” New York Times reporter Peter Baker told Farhi about the practice. “It’s not intended to increase candor.”

That’s assuming reporters can get near administration officials in the first place. The administration has kept the president unencumbered by reporters during two meetings with super PAC donors this week, and it limited coverage of an event in Washington Tuesday, Edward Isaac Dovere and Josh Gerstein report in Politico.… Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Verge EIC Joshua Topolsky will join Bloomberg

The New York Times | The Verge | CJR

Joshua Topolsky will join Bloomberg “as the editor of a series of new online ventures it is launching as part of a revamped journalism strategy,” Ravi Somaiya reports in The New York Times.

Topolsky co-founded The Verge in 2011. Verge co-founder Nilay Patel left the publication in March to become acting managing editor of Vox.com, which, like The Verge, is published by Vox Media. Patel will become The Verge’s new top editor. Dieter Bohn will be its executive editor. “This is going to be rad,” Patel writes.

Topolsky’s move “is bucking the trend of young, web-native journalists leaving established media brands for smaller, more nimble startups,” Somaiya writes. The splashy hire comes on the same day as a CJR story that says Bloomberg News employees are becoming restless as they await the company’s reinvention under Bloomberg Media Group CEO Justin Smith.… Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Ad revenue down at McClatchy

The McClatchy Co.

Advertising revenue was down 7 percent in the second quarter of 2014 at the McClatchy Co., which released earnings Thursday. “Audience” revenue, which is what McClatchy now calls circulation revenue, was up about 5 percent. Excluding revenue from McClatchy’s change to fee-for-service circulation delivery contracts at some newspapers, circulation revenue was down about 3 percent.

“Still, we continued to see growth in direct marketing and digital advertising revenues and together these two sources accounted for 43% of our total advertising revenue in the quarter,” McClatchy CEO Pat Talamantes said in a statement.

McClatchy’s results include $146 million it made by selling its share of Apartments.com and, “to a lesser extent,” its share in in McClatchy‑Tribune Information Services. Tribune bought out McClatchy’s share in MCT in May.… Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
Italy Monuments Man

MailOnline’s ad revenue soars, Clooney be damned

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Bloomberg News employees are getting restive: Bloomberg Media Group CEO Justin Smith‘s “broad goals still don’t add up to a rationale for the enterprise,” Dean Starkman writes. (CJR)
  2. Sorry, George Clooney: MailOnline’s second-quarter advertising revenue was up 49 percent over the same period in 2013. Digital advertising brought in £15m (about $25.5m), which “offset a £3m (5 per cent) fall in print advertising revenue from the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday, which stood at £46m for the quarter.” (PressGazette) | The Daily Mail’s “great stories you may not have seen anywhere else” are often untrue or ripped off. (Craig Silverman) | More earnings: McClatchy’s Q2 earnings report is due today.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

AP sends clumsily worded tweet about MH17 victims, world reacts

No, the plane didn’t crash.

“This was an especially regrettable lapse that drew wide attention as Dutch families awaited the return of their loved ones’ remains,” AP spokesperson Paul Colford writes in a blog post.

I looked through the AP Stylebook for guidance on compound verbs (i.e., “crash-lands” as opposed to “crash lands”) and came up empty. I’d hyphenate that verb if that was the intended meaning, but the book advises “the fewer hyphens the better; use them only when not using them causes confusion.” It does advise against using “awkward constructions that split infinitive forms of a verb…or compound forms.”

A lot of Twitter hounds suggested a comma (e.g.Read more

Tools:
3 Comments
Colorado Shooting-Batman Mythology

21st Century Fox gets back into the newspaper business

Good morning. Here are 10-ish media stories.

  1. Another tough year for newspapers? Gannett’s earnings report showed weak national advertising and “just how unequal the local broadcast and local newspaper businesses have become.” Circulation “is a relative bright spot, though overall it was down slightly.” (Poynter) | A “a well-programmed computer could have done better” than I did in yesterday’s morning roundup, Alan D. Mutter writes. The post highlighted the report’s statement that circulation revenue increased at local papers. “[I]n his haste to crank out a story, the author evidently relied on the bafflegab in Gannett’s press release, instead of looking at the several pages of detailed financial tables appended to it.” (Reflections of a Newsosaur)
  2. Alan Murray leaves Pew to edit Fortune: Pew “will promptly begin a search for the new president” of Pew Research Center.
Read more
Tools:
1 Comment

Newspaper tries to keep publishing in fire-pounded region

The Wenatchee World | Methow Valley News (Facebook)

While Washington state’s Methow Valley is being ravaged by wildfires, the Methow Valley News is trying to keep publishing. That’s complicated, because its working from a region where few have electricity.

Publisher Don Nelson obtained a generator after his partner, Poynter Editing Fellow Jacqui Banaszynski, put out a call on Facebook and Twitter. Two former coworkers arranged to get him one, Banaszynski writes in an email.

Now, “Reporters have been out gathering stories with pen and paper and bringing or phoning them in so office staff can type them in on a cell phone with Internet service to get stories on the paper’s Facebook page,” Rick Steigmeyer reports in The Wenatchee World. … Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Alan Murray: Fortune ‘feels like a calling’

Murray in 2008, when he was an executive editor of The Wall Street Journal. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

In a memo to Pew Research Center staffers this morning, President Alan Murray said he hadn’t pursued the job of Fortune editor. He was named to the post this morning.

The magazine was “one of only two places I applied to work after finishing my graduate degree,” he writes, saying the opportunity to go there “feels like a calling, and it is one I find impossible to resist.”

Pew “will promptly begin a search for the new president” of the research center, Pew Charitable Trusts President and CEO Rebecca Rimel told Poynter this morning. Jim McMillan will act as president during the search, Murray writes.

Memo:… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Pew’s Alan Murray will edit Fortune

Alan Murray will leave his post as the president of the Pew Research Center to become the new editor of Fortune, Fortune announced Tuesday. Current Fortune Editor Andy Serwer “is leaving Time Inc.,” the release says. Murray left The Wall Street Journal to run Pew in 2012.

Pew “will promptly begin a search for the new president” of the research center, Pew Charitable Trusts President and CEO Rebecca Rimel tells Poynter in a statement. (Here’s Murray’s note to Pew staffers.)

Murray’s “experience at The Wall Street Journal gave him a keen understanding of evolving media trends, and he also brought to the job a high level of enthusiasm and appreciation for the unique attributes of the Center,” Rimel says. “His work over the last year and a half has positioned the Center well for the future.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Earns Gannett

Circulation revenue rises at Gannett’s local papers

Good morning. Here are 10 (OK, perhaps slightly more than 10) media stories.

  1. Gannett had a good second quarter: Broadcast revenue was “almost 88 percent higher in the quarter compared to the second quarter last year.” Publishing advertising revenue fell about 5 percent; circulation was roughly flat, and “At local domestic publishing sites, home delivery circulation revenue was up in the quarter due, in part, to strategic pricing actions associated with enhanced content.” (Gannett)
  2. Washington Post fights the “wonk wars”: The Washington Post’s new “Storyline” project is “dedicated to the power of stories to help us understand complicated, critical things,” Editor Jim Tankersley writes. (The Washington Post) | Michael Calderone takes a look: “It’s unlikely The Post would’ve launched a project like Storyline a few years ago.” (HuffPost) | Tankersley writes that as a college student he was inspired by Richard Read‘s 1998 series about french fries: “Those stories brought the crisis home in a way no textbook or straight news piece could, because at each step, they showed how global trends touched people’s lives and livelihoods.” (The Oregonian)
  3. Why corrupt politicians should avoid Vermont: Vermont has the best-covered legislature in the country, and California has the worst, Pew finds.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments