Andrew Beaujon

Andrew Beaujon reports on the media for Poynter Online. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture. He lives in Alexandria, Va., with his family. His email is abeaujon@poynter.org, his phone number is 703-594-1103, and he tweets @abeaujon.


tett-featured-small

FT’s new U.S. boss: Journalists should ‘turn the microscope’ on themselves

Last July, Gillian Tett, who started her job as the Financial Times’ U.S. managing editor Sept. 1, wrote about the influence Pierre Bourdieu had on her work. Bourdieu, a French sociologist and intellectual, identified the “social silences” that can perpetuate the status quo if they’re allowed to fester.

“I think it’s beholden on journalists to turn the microscope around and look at themselves more than they actually do,” Tett said in a phone interview.

Tett.

This is not just theory for Tett, who has a Ph.D. in social anthropology. When she covered London’s financial world for the FT, she identified collateralized debt obligations and credit default swaps as areas swaddled in silence. Tett and her team “very much warned of the dangers” these instruments presented to the world economy, she told Laura Barton in 2008, warnings that you may have heard went mostly unheeded.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

3 Journalists killed while covering Ebola crisis

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Journalists killed while covering Ebola crisis: A delegation including government officials, doctors and journalists was attacked in a Guinean village Tuesday. Eight people were killed. (LAT) | Three journalists are among the dead. (Reuters) | “Many residents of rural villages have reacted with fear and panic when outsiders have come to conduct awareness campaigns and have even attacked health clinics.” (AP) | “How journalists covering the Ebola outbreak try to stay safe” (Poynter) | “While reporting on Ebola, the smell of chlorine ‘is one of the most comforting smells in the world’” (Poynter) | Kristen Hare‘s Twitter list of reporters covering the Ebola outbreak.
  2. Turkey tussles with the Times: The NYT published a correction on a Sept.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

AFP will no longer use work from freelancers in Syria

AFP

Agence France-Presse will “no longer accept work from freelance journalists who travel to places where we ourselves would not venture,” global news director Michèle Léridon writes. AFP has a bureau in Damascus. Leridon continues:

It is a strong decision, and one that may not have been made clear enough, so I will repeat it here: if someone travels to Syria and offers us images or information when they return, we will not use it. Freelancers have paid a high price in the Syrian conflict. High enough. We will not encourage people to take that kind of risk.

Léridon also lays out a nuanced position on whether AFP will rebroadcast images that originated with the Islamic State group, saying it’s a “case by case basis.” She writes:

IS videos are widely available online.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
tampabaytimes-box

Tampa Bay Times cuts staff pay, hints at layoffs

The Tampa Bay Times will cut staff pay 5 percent, Times Publishing Company CEO Paul Tash tells staffers in a letter Thursday.

The company will also cap severance payments to employees who leave voluntarily at eight weeks’ pay, unless they resign by Oct. 1, in which case the maximum severance is 13 weeks’ pay. The letter hints at layoffs: “After these voluntary departures, we will take stock of the company’s ongoing staff patterns and needs,” Tash writes.

He continues:

If you are uncertain about your standing with the Times, this is a good time for a frank conversation with your supervisor. If this long, difficult stretch has tested your commitment to the Times or the newspaper business, this is a good time to consider your options.

Read more
Tools:
2 Comments

A good NYT review can cancel out a Washington Post pan

Emerging Arts Leaders DC

The “difference between bad reviews and great reviews over the course of a season is around $50,000 in revenue for Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company,” Woolly Mammoth marketing manager Steven Dawson writes.

One Washington Post critic, Peter Marks, has an outsized impact on ticket sales, Dawson writes: A mediocre Marks review will bring in 2 percent of the total revenue of a show, he found, while a rave will bring in 6 percent of total revenue.

Marks panned one show, “The Totalitarians,” which brought in 0 percent of revenue — 12 tickets, Dawson writes. But a Marks pan of another production, “Stupid Fucking Bird,” was offset by a theater-appropriate deus ex machina:

Charles Isherwood decided to come from the New York Times and review the play, which had already won multiple awards and had created quite the buzz.

Read more
Tools:
1 Comment

British journalist said to be in ISIS video

Reuters

British journalist John Cantlie purportedly appears in a video posted by supporters of the Islamic State group.

“I am a prisoner,” Reuters reports the man identified as Cantlie says. “That I cannot deny. But seeing as I’ve been abandoned by my government and my fate now lies in the hands of the Islamic State, I have nothing to lose.”

Cantlie, a photographer who has done work for the BBC and Britain’s Sunday Times, had been held hostage in Syria in 2012 and was released.

Cantlie was “anxious to get back out in the field” after the ordeal, Mike Giglio reported in August 2012. “I need to work,” Cantlie told him. “This is what I do.”… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Susan Glasser

Susan Glasser is Politico’s new editor

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Politico gets a new boss: Politico Magazine Editor Susan Glasser is now the editor of Politico, Dylan Byers reports. John Harris will remain editor-in-chief. “She will appoint a new Executive Editor to oversee day-to-day newsroom operations, the leadership said. That person will replace Rick Berke, who resigned earlier this month.” (Politico) | Glasser will still oversee Politico Magazine, but will hire some senior editors in the next weeks. “Susan has plans to sharpen the editorial structure, bring in even more talent, upgrade our digital properties and bring more clarity and efficiency — and individual ownership — to our workflow,” CEO Jim VandeHei says in a memo to staff. | “One of the issues that led to Mr.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

Journalists report threats while covering Scottish referendum

The Guardian | CPJ

Some journalists have reported threats while reporting on the Scottish independence referendum, Tara Conlan reports for The Guardian.

Both people in favor of Scotland becoming independent and of it staying part of the United Kingdom have allegedly made threats to journalists.

One journalist who blogged about a discussion about Orange Order support march for the Better Together campaign claims that a serious threat has been made about his family from a no supporter and has now reported the incident to police.

Another reporter who blogged about their intention to vote yes to independence is understood to have been threatened with physical violence and having their “head kicked in”.

CPJ’s report on threats to journalists in the U.K. in 2013 focused on surveillance and harrassment by the government.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Pro-pot group uses Maureen Dowd lookalike on billboard

U.S. News & World Report

The Marijuana Policy Project has placed a billboard in Denver featuring a woman with red hair, holding her face in one hand, with the legend “Don’t let a candy bar ruin your vacation.” New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd wrote in June about an extremely uncool night that she experienced in Denver after eating a pot-laced candy bar.

“I love it,” Dowd told U.S. News’ Steven Nelson about the billboard. “I’m going to make it my Christmas card.” MPP spokesperson Morgan Fox tells Poynter the organization plans to expand the campaign to Washington state next. … Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Democrats’ trust in media falls

Gallup

54 percent of Democrats have a great deal or fair amount of trust in the news media, according to a new poll by Gallup. That’s a 14-year low. Republicans’ trust in the media fell from last year, and independents’ trust inched up one percentage point.

One interesting finding: The percentage of people who complained the media is “too conservative” rose six percentage points this year. The percentage of people who thought the media was “too liberal” fell two points.

Overall, the percentage of Americans who trust the media fell to 40 percent, the same all-time low this survey hit in 2012, before rocketing to 44 percent last year.

Trust in the media tends to drop during election years, Gallup notes, which suggests “something about national elections triggers skepticism about the accuracy of the news media’s reporting.” … Read more

Tools:
0 Comments