Andrew Beaujon

Andrew Beaujon reports on the media for Poynter Online. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture. He lives in Alexandria, Va., with his family. His email is abeaujon@poynter.org, his phone number is 703-594-1103, and he tweets @abeaujon.


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How news orgs plan digital coverage of midterms

Tuesday’s midterm elections will determine which party controls of the U.S. Senate. There are also 36 gubernatorial races, and the biennial U.S. House elections. Here’s how some news organizations plan digital coverage of the races. (This is by no means comprehensive; please email me your plans.)

ABC News will feature a live stream on its site, on its mobile app and on Apple TV. It plans some killer mobile alerts: One every time it calls one of the 507 races it’s covering Tuesday. Don’t worry, you won’t get 507 alerts: You can tell your app what your interest is overall (low, medium, or high), or pick individual races, or let it know your location and it will tell you the winners and losers near you. You’ll also be able to watch live video via iPhone and iPad apps.

The Associated Press says it “has reporters working in every statehouse throughout the year, and more than 5,000 stringers will be deployed across the country on election night to help AP Election Services gather local vote counts.” Its mobile app will feature coverage from member newspapers in hot-race states as well as “a dynamic feed of race calls, photos and videos.” Here’s a Twitter list of AP reporters on election duty.

The Boston Globe plans a “A homepage takeover with results for key races” as well as “A second-screen experience where reporters will file dispatches from the field on election night,” BostonGlobe.com Editor Jason Tuohey tells Poynter. Plus, of course, stories, results, analysis.

CBS News will offer a livestream of network coverage and “will provide a variety of tools to help users navigate the voting results, including interactive maps and exit poll data as it becomes available,” it says in a press release. CBS News’ site will also “feature original reports from CBS News correspondents in the field.”

CNN plans a live “Hambycast,” which will start streaming at 8 p.m. on CNN.com. The site will also feature a “digital version of John King’s infamous Magic Wall, where users can drill into the districts and data for themselves,” CNN says in a release. Plus: Short animated videos, like this one, that CNN has been posting on Facebook, and an experiment with the gaming platform Pivit, where you can play games like “Will Florida Governor Scott (R) win re-election?” PLUS: A chat on Facebook at 1 p.m. with Peter Hamby, Chris Moody and Stephen Collinson.

The Denver Post will feature live video from its video initiative DPTV, Post news director Kevin Dale said. New anchor Molly Hughes will speak with Post reporters through the night. The Post will replace its homepage “with a larger Elections presentation that will help us highlight our video, stories and results,” Dale said.

Visitors to Fox Newssite can look at a dashboard that shows balance of power graphics, links to predictions and news stories. Fox News’ coverage will be available to people using the FoxNewsGo app as well. Fox News will stream two video entities online from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET: FOX News Latino, and a revival of its old online show “The Strategy Room.”

The Huffington Post‘s politics crew will run a live blog, and HuffPost Live will “stream special coverage of midterm election night 2014, hosted by Marc Lamont Hill, Alyona Minkovski and Howard Fineman” from 6 p.m. until midnight Tuesday, HuffPost spokesperson Sujata Mitra said.

Hotline’s Race tracker will power National Journal‘s election-night dashboard. NationalJournal.com will also feature a live blog featuring “instant updates, reporting, video, photos, and commentary on the races as they are called,” the publication says in a press release.

NBC News will roll out a new look for online and on-screen graphics, NBCNews.com’s product and operations director, Rachel Rique, said. “We designed it for mobile so it’s a lighter weight and a lighter feel,” she said. Visitors to NBC’s homepage will see a status bar that shows balance of power in the Senate and House, and prominent links to a redesigned elections page, which will host live video coverage, stories and links to “cards” for individual races. When NBC’s decision desk makes a call, the anchors will announce the result, and a new API will push a green check mark next to the winner’s name on a card. Those cards can easily be shared on social media.

The New York Times will have correspondents on the ground in 10 states with competitive races, and it will feature “Real-time election results across all of our platforms and devices, including our web site, mobile web site and phone and tablet apps,” Times spokesperson Danielle Rhoades-Ha said in an email. Times data-y vertical The Upshot “will be applying its usual analytical, graphic-heavy methods to Election Night, on nytimes.com, Twitter and elsewhere.” Plus interactive maps, detailed results pages and photo essays “that tell the story of the election in a way that only the Times’s photojournalists can.”

NPR is throwing an “election party,” and guess what: You’re invited! (Sorry, getting a little punchy here.) NPR.org will stream the news org’s live coverage, from 8 p.m. ET to 1 a.m., and the NPR politics desk’s Tumblr will feature “live blogging, photos and more,” according to a release. There will also be an “expanded version [of NPR's coverage] built for television and optimized for Google Chromecast.” Also I’d like to salute NPR’s PR squad for including the sentence “Party on, Melissa. Party on, Robert” in a press release.

USA Today will livestream “segments from the USA TODAY newsroom featuring political pundits and USA TODAY experts,” Gannett spokesperson Steve Kidera said. “In partnership with Gannett’s Video Production Center and Gannett Broadcasting, all the key races across the country will be covered, including live reports from many Gannett Broadcasting stations and campaign headquarters. Beginning at 8 p.m. (ET) and running throughout the night, coverage will be viewable across mobile, tablet and desktop devices on USATODAY.com, all Gannett Broadcasting websites and many of Gannett’s USCP sites.” USA Today’s elections forecast tool “will turn into a results page” on election night.

The Wall Street Journal will launch “a special election hub that will track the key races in real-time with live headline feeds and data galore,” U.S. news editor Glenn Hall said. “A key feature of the data hub will be a comprehensive map that allows users to drill down into voting results in each Congressional district of every state.” The Journal’s homepage will have “a live election scorecard, an interactive map, streaming video analysis, a live blog, real-time headlines and scores of analytical articles updated throughout the night.” Its relaunched politics section, Capitol Journal, “will serve as the content hub for our election news and analysis.”

The Washington Post plans a “takeover display” of its Election Live Stream — maps, graphics, stories, etc. on its homepage. “Users will also have an option to switch to the original homepage to access a variety of non-election stories,” the company says, and the stream will work on mobile. Post reporters will be covering hot races on the ground in 10 states beyond the three in the Washington, D.C., metro area.

Pregame coverage:
CNN plans a Twitter chat with Jake Tapper Friday and a Facebook chat with SE Cupp Monday.

The New York TimesUpshot Senate model “is being updated at least twice a day as new polls come in to help readers assess the state of the most competitive races,” Rhoades-Ha said. The Times also plans a readers’ guide to important races, a “voters’ voices video with a distinctly 2014 midterm feel that focuses on the national mood” and state pages that “give a closer look at the most interesting races and ballot initiatives in all 50 states.”

Twitter‘s election dashboard lets you drill down to individual states or look at national trends and issues being discussed.

USA Today and Twitter have partnered on a political issues list that breaks down tweeters on various issues by their age, gender and state. The index “makes no attempt to analyze the sentiment expressed in tweets — only the subject area,” Paul Singer writes. USA Today has also decided “not to compare tweet volume around various candidate names, because in the last days of the campaign swing so much of the Twitter traffic around candidates is driven by campaigns, consultants and other professional partisans.” USA Today also has an iOS app that tracks political ads. Read more

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Sun-Times confirms sale of suburban papers to Tribune

Chicago Sun-Times | Tribune Publishing

Chicago Sun-Times parent Wrapports LLC will sell 38 suburban newspapers — six dailies and 32 weeklies — to Tribune Publishing, confirming a report by Robert Feder earlier this month.

Wrapports boss Michael Ferro says the move out of the burbs will allow the company to “focus on our international digital strategy.” Wrapports announced earlier this week that it was launching a national network of sites that will ““offer content in a manner similar to websites such as Deadspin and Buzzfeed.”

Employees at the suburban papers will become Tribune Publishing employees at some point and will leave the Sun-Times’ newsroom. The Sun-Times said in 2012 it would close its suburban offices and move most employees into Chicago digs. Terms of the deal aren’t public yet, according to a Wrapports press release. Bob Fleck will be publisher and GM of the papers, Tribune Publishing says in a press release.

The Sun-Times and the Chicago Tribune Media Group have also reached an agreement for CTMG to keep printing the Sun-Times.

Since splitting from the rest of Tribune’s properties, Tribune Publishing has pursued a strategy of increasing its footprint in markets where it has large dailies. In Maryland it’s purchased the Baltimore City Paper and two other papers; in Connecticut it has purchased 15 weeklies once published by Reminder Media. Read more

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NYT ends partnership with Texas Tribune

mediawiremorningHappy Halloween! Here are 10 scaaaaary media stories.

  1. NYT ends partnership with Texas Tribune

    The Times told the news nonprofit that at the end of this year it will no longer produce a two-page section for the paper's Texas edition. "We hate to see the whole thing come to an end, but it's like that line from The Godfather: It’s business, not personal," Trib EIC Evan Smith writes. (Texas Tribune) | Interesting inversion: The Dallas Morning News' Sunday edition will include an insert produced by the New York Times. (NYTCo) | Related: CEO Mark Thompson wants the Times to be “unashamedly experimental.” (Nieman Lab) | 9 takeways from the New York Times Co. 3rd quarter earnings call (Poynter) | Only slightly related to that last related item: Rick Edmonds notes that Denise Warren is the third woman Times exec to leave in the past three years; Erik Wemple reported yesterday that the last woman on The Washington Post's masthead is leaving. (WP)

  2. So it should be an interesting day at First Look Media

    Four reporters at First Look's The Intercept -- Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras, Jeremy Scahill and John Cook -- published an unsparing examination of why Matt Taibbi left the company. "Those conflicts were rooted in a larger and more fundamental culture clash that has plagued the project from the start: A collision between the First Look executives, who by and large come from a highly structured Silicon Valley corporate environment, and the fiercely independent journalists who view corporate cultures and management-speak with disdain," they write. (The Intercept) | "With the publishing of their post, Greenwald et al confirm some of the worst fears about the company and contradict others. They claim that Omidyar has not interfered with the editorial work of journalists, but was clearly unprepared for the cultural differences between executives and rabble-rousing journalists." (Mashable) | "if Hunter S. Thompson was still alive, FL would have hired him to turn him into a middle manager" (@jbenton) | "From all the details of Taibbi’s allegedly terrible management practices and the details of First Look’s struggles against the IRON FIST of First Look Media emerges a picture of utter ungovernability and an unwillingness to concede that the person bankrolling a venture might just have a say in how things get done." (WP)

  3. The odds of new news orgs surviving

    BuzzFeed: "High." Vice: "Medium-hiiiiigh." Vox "is also doing better traffic and growing more quickly than Gawker, and is extremely popular with 'Millennials.' Euthanize Vox immediately." (Gawker)

  4. Arkansans don't think much of journalists

    "Of those polled, only 14 percent believe that journalists have high or very high standards. Another 39 percent would rate the honesty and ethical standards of journalists as average, and 36 percent responded with low or very low. The remainder, about 12 percent, did not know or refused to answer." (University of Arkansas)

  5. Another Jian Ghomeshi story

    "I feel that while it is exceedingly difficult to publicly put your name forward and open yourself up to all of the accompanying criticism, if you are in the position that you can do so without fearing the ramifications in terms of your family, marriage, personal or professional trauma, then you should do it," Reva Seth writes. (HuffPost)

  6. The Newspaper Guild is not especially cool with the FBI right now

    In an emailed statement, it says it's "disgusted and outraged by the revelation this week that the FBI posed as The Associated Press in planting an online story to catch a teenage bomb threat suspect in 2007. ... Any hint that a journalist or news organization is aiding law enforcement damages their reputation as an objective, trustworthy source of news." | U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy sent a letter to the attorney general expressing concern about the sting. (The Seattle Times) | Sort-of related: Akron Beacon Journal asks campaign to stop using doctored front page in ads. (Jim Romenesko)

  7. Spain passses aggregation tax

    New laws will "allow news publishers to charge aggregators each time they display news content in search results." (AP) | Google statement: "We are disappointed with the new law because we believe that services like Google News help publishers bring traffic to their sites." (THR)

  8. Depressing British media news roundup

    The Telegraph lays off 55 staffers. (The Business of Fashion) | The Scotsman, Scotland on Sunday and the Edinburgh Evening News will combine operations, leading to a loss of 45 jobs. (The Guardian) | The Hull Daily Mail apologizes for wrongly identifying a man as a sex offender. (Hold the Front Page)

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    A spoooooooky front from the Asbury Park Press! (Courtesy the Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin

    Shane Harris will be an intelligence and national security reporter at The Daily Beast. He's a senior writer at Foreign Policy. (The Huffington Post) | Azmat Khan will be an investigative reporter at BuzzFeed. She's a senior digital producer at Al Jazeera America. (Azmat Khan) | Usha Chaudhary will be chief financial officer at Pew Charitable Trusts. She's the chief financial officer at The Washington Post. (The Washingoton Post) | Eli Lake will be a columnist at Bloomberg View. He’s a national security correspondent at The Daily Beast. Josh Rogin will be a columnist at Bloomberg View. He’s a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast. (Politico) | Krista Larson is West Africa bureau chief for The Associated Press. Previously, she was a correspondent there. (AP) | Nona Willis Aronowitz is an editor at TPM. Previously, she was an education and poverty reporter at NBC News Digital. (TPM) | Om Malik is looking for a designer. Get your résumés in! (Om Malik) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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Report: More than a dozen walk from Cincinnati Enquirer

Cincinnati Business Courier

Cincinnati Enquirer Managing Editor Laura Trujillo is leaving the newspaper rather than stick around for the Gannett-owned title’s reorganization, Chris Wetterich reports for the Cincinnati Business Courier.

More than a dozen people in the newsroom are also departing, Wetterich reports: “Veteran employees told the Courier they are heading for the door because they would rather take a buyout package than go through another round of upheaval and the indignity of reapplying for jobs at a company they’ve worked at for decades.”

Mark Curnutte, Bill Koch, John Erardi, Sheila McLaughlin and Jessica Brown are among those leaving, as are three photographers, Wetterich reports. “Nearly all of the Enquirer’s 11 copy editing positions are being eliminated, although staffers in that department could apply for the new jobs,” he writes. “Copy editing and design of the newspaper will be done at a regional Gannett site.”

Editors will be known as “strategists” in the new Enquirer newsroom, Enquirer Editor Carolyn Washburn tells Wetterich. An email from Washburn to staffers says the Enquirer has hired several strategists already, as well as a daily news coach (Meghan Wesley) and a visuals coach (Michael McCarter).

Gannett newspapers all over the country are rolling out versions of a “newsroom of the future,” a massive structural change that requires staffers who want to stay to reapply for mostly new jobs. Steve Cavendish reported for Nashville Scene last week that the Gannett-owned Tennessean has brought in reporters from corporate siblings to help it put out the paper during the transition. Read more

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Tim Cook files clean copy, Businessweek editor says

Bloomberg TV

Apple’s CEO acknowledged in a Bloomberg Businessweek essay today that he’s gay. How’d that article end up in Businessweek?

“The backstory is pretty simple,” Businessweek Editor Josh Tyrangiel says in an interview with Tom Keene. “He called and asked if he could come out.”

Tyrangiel says Cook’s draft “was crisp and clear, and frankly I hope he is available for more assignments going forward. He was very easy to work with on this.”

Read more

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graphicjournalism

There are a lot of good illustrated journalism pieces this week

CIR | Al Jazeera America | CityLab

Three good examples of illustrated journalism arrived this week. That’s not a trend, but it’s a welcome opportunity to highlight alternative storytelling forms.

The Center for Investigative Reporting just published “Techsploitation,” a graphic novel that tells the story of an Indian man who ended up in a “guesthouse,” applying for work online after he thought he was getting a job in the States. CIR reporter Matt Smith also illustrated the book, which accompanies his much longer text-based story about shady job brokers.

A page fron "Techsploitation"

A page fron “Techsploitation”

The Guardian also ran “Techsploitation” online.

Meghann Farnsworth, CIR’s director of distribution and engagement, said she didn’t yet know the extent to which the partnership boosted the book’s reach, but said “On social media we’ve seen a lot of people excited to see it.” CIR is also trying to figure out how many print copies of the book to make — some will go to colleges and media organizations in India, Farnsworth said, and others might become premiums for CIR’s members.

A previous CIR graphic novel, “The Box,” was also produced by CIR’s Michael I. Schiller, and the news organization printed that one, too. “Digital is amazing, but there’s something about holding things in your hands,” Farnsworth said.

Al Jazeera America published “Terms of Service,” a less-than-rosy look at how big data is letting companies monetize your life — and come up with their own stories about you that you can’t control. Michael Keller and Josh Neufeld wrote and star in the book, which follows them to Colorado and New York.

A page from "Terms of Service"

A page from “Terms of Service”

Rhyne Piggott, the news organization’s head of multimedia and mobile, tells Poynter in an email that AJAM plans a print version of “Terms of Service.”

CityLab just republished “Compartment 13,” a comic by Darryl Holliday and Jamie Hibdon about the effects of anti-homeless measures in Chicago.

A detail from "Compartment 13"

A detail from “Compartment 13″

Holliday and Hidden created the piece for Symbolia Magazine, CityLab senior associate editor Shauna Miller tells Poynter in an email. (The piece was also published in partnership with Illustrated Press and the Journalism Center for Children on Families, which funded it.) “We did not commission Compartment 13, we simply connected with the writers on a tip from one of our staffers and took it on just as we would take a reported article from any freelancer,” she writes.

The story “is also part of a book that Darryl is working on that will provide a snapshot of life on Kedzie Avenue in Chicago,” Symbolia Editor Erin Polgreen tells Poynter in an email. Polgreen edited “Compartment 13″ and plans to edit Holliday’s book as well, which Holliday plans to crowd-fund.

Miller said CityLab hadn’t run a piece like this before but said she is “embarking on editing a series on homelessness for CityLab and thought this was a really good way into the human side of the issue (which is the hardest layer to get through regarding this issue with readers).”

Related: Journalists, Artists Tell Stories with Nonfiction Graphic Novels | From radio reporter to graphic novelist, how Brooke Gladstone became a character in ‘The Influencing Machine’ | California Watch tells difficult story with video, tweets (and text) Read more

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NYT added 44,000 digital subscribers in the third quarter

The New York Times Company

The New York Times Company added 44,000 subscribers to its digital-only products in the third quarter of 2014, “an increase of more than 20 percent compared with the end of the third quarter of 2013,” it says in its third-quarter earnings report, released Thursday.

The company says it now has 875,000 subscribers to digital-only products. It added 32,000 subscribers in the second quarter.

Revenue at the company was a little better than flat: up about 1 percent overall, with circulation revenue up 1.6 percent, advertising revenue down .4 percent and other revenue — including events — up about 4 percent.

Print ad revenue was down about 5 percent, and digital ad revenue was up 16.5 percent. Operating costs rose 9 percent, “mainly due to severance expense associated with previously disclosed workforce reductions as well as higher compensation and benefits expenses primarily related to the Company’s strategic initiatives,” the release says.

Times digital honcho Denise Warren left the company this week, part of what Times Co. President and CEO Mark Thompson calls a “reorganization that is intended to accelerate the development of our digital consumer business by creating separate marketing and digital divisions.” He continues: “Our audience development efforts also remain a top priority, with the goal of extending our already broad reach and deepening the engagement of our readers.” Read more

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8 women accuse Ghomeshi of assault, harassment

Good morning. Here are nine media stories.

  1. Women say Jian Ghomeshi choked, assaulted, harassed them

    The former CBC host's accusers "describe a man obsessed with his image and power, and someone who they say has little or no respect for barriers," Kevin Donovan and Jesse Brown write. Most of the women stayed anonymous but "Trailer Park Boys" actor Lucy DeCoutere put her name to her charges. Ghomeshi's alleged behavior was not confined to his private life, the report says: One woman said he told her “I want to hate f--- you” in a meeting and later "cupped her buttocks." When she complained, a producer asked her “what (she) could do to make this a less toxic work environment?” Ghomeshi, who is suing the CBC following his dismissal, did not comment. (Toronto Star) | Dan Savage: "Ghomeshi isn't a safe, sane, and consensual kinkster. He's a reckless, abusive, and dangerous one who has traumatized some women and lucked out with others." (The Stranger) | Melissa Martin: The "'pattern of behaviour' Ghomeshi accused his accusers of trying to create, it existed long before their allegations did." (Nothing in Winnipeg)

  2. Tim Cook writes about being gay

    "I don’t consider myself an activist, but I realize how much I’ve benefited from the sacrifice of others. So if hearing that the CEO of Apple is gay can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is, or bring comfort to anyone who feels alone, or inspire people to insist on their equality, then it’s worth the trade-off with my own privacy." (Bloomberg Businessweek)

  3. NYT Co. 3Q earnings today

    The company "is seeing favorable earnings estimate revision activity as of late, which is generally a precursor to an earnings beat." (Zacks) | Expect questions about the sudden departure of digital boss Denise Warren at the earnings call, at 11 a.m. (NYTCo)

  4. New pages

    The homepage is The Guardian's “single strongest lever to direct attention," director of digital strategy Wolfgang Blau tells Sam Kirkland. “People go to edited sources because they trust to be told what really is important,” creative director Alex Breuer says. Still, 59 percent of visits to The Guardian last month originated on article pages. (Poynter) | NPR launches its new music site with an Auto-Tune-free T-Pain concert. (NPR)

  5. Why does the U.S. detain so many journalists at borders?

    "It may be the case that journalists' travel patterns and data flows just happen to trigger alerts within federal databases," Geoffrey King writes. "But the experiences of the journalists CPJ interviewed make it clear that CBP's broad discretion is having a negative impact on the free flow of news." (CPJ)

  6. Gawker may cover Albany

    "The last thing I want to do is say, 'We're gonna fuck Albany up and take down Cuomo or whatever!'" Gawker EIC Max Read tells Peter Sterne. "We may send people up there and find that we have nothing to write about and nothing to do." (Capital)

  7. David Plotz explains the basic problem the Internet presents publishers

    "The internet doesn’t work like a print magazine," Slate's former editor tells Christopher Massie. "You don’t pull people into Slate through one thing and then they stay for another." Plotz also talks about his new job at Atlas Obscura: "The chance to do a different kind of journalism which has a sense of mission that is about delight and joy and discovery is appealing." (CJR)

  8. Front pages of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    Pride in San Francisco. Stoicism in Kansas City. (Courtesy the Newseum)

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  9. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin

    Elise Hu will be NPR's Asia correspondent in Seoul. She covers tech and culture at NPR. (Poynter) | Mitra Kalita is now executive editor-at-large for Quartz. Previously, she was ideas editor there. Paul Smalera will be Quartz' new ideas editor. He is editor of The New York Times opinion app. (Poynter) | Donald Baer is now chairman of PBS' board of directors. He is CEO of Burson-Marsteller. (PBS) | Jessica Coen is now a contributing editor at Marie Claire. She is an editor-at-large with Jezebel. (Fishbowl NY) | Stephen Lacy is now chairman of the Association of Magazine Media. He is CEO of the Meredith Corporation. (Email) | Dan Katz will be chief of staff to Arianna Huffington. He's currently a chief researcher for David Gergen. Maxwell Strachan is now senior editor of business and tech at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was business editor there. (email) | Emily Yoshida will be entertainment editor at The Verge. Previously, she was culture editor at Grantland. (Muck Rack) | Job of the day: The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a digital news editor. Ger your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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What is going on at First Look Media?

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are nine media stories.

  1. What’s going on at First Look Media?

    Matt Taibbi has left the company, Pierre Omidyar announced Wednesday. "Our differences were never about editorial independence," Omidyar writes. (First Look Media) | Andrew Rice reported earlier in the day that Taibbi "has been absent from the office for several weeks." "I don’t comment about internal matters," First Look executive John Temple told Rice. (New York) | "First Look exec on its radical culture of transparency: "I don’t comment...we’re a private company, so why would we?" (@tomgara) | "what has happened is bad and dumb and needless and not matt taibbi’s fault" (@johnjcook) | Omidyar gadfly Paul Carr published his half of an off-the-record conversation with Taibbi. (Pando) | "Off the record does not mean you can publish your half of a conversation with a source." (@mtaibbi) | Michael Calderone, this time last year: "What exactly they’re building is unclear -– even to those directly involved." (HuffPost)

  2. Denise Warren leaves NYT Co.

    "A memo written by Arthur Sulzberger Jr., chairman of the Times Company, and Mark Thompson, the company’s chief executive, said that they had decided to split Ms. Warren’s position into two jobs: an executive vice president for marketing and an executive vice president for digital. Ms. Warren declined to take either job and decided to leave the company, according to the memo." (NYT) | "After Robinson was ousted in 2011, Warren was the No. 2 candidate for the C.E.O. slot that ended up going to Thompson, a former BBC bigwig, two sources with knowledge of the matter told Capital." (Capital)

  3. Ben Bradlee's funeral will be on TV

    C-SPAN will broadcast the event today at 11 a.m. | An appreciation by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. (WP) | Howard Simons, Bradlee's managing editor, is a "forgotten man, without whom Bradlee might never have been seen as so great." (Politico Magazine)

  4. Sun-Times owner launches national network of aggregated sites

    Wrapports LLC has launched these things, whatever the heck they are, in 70 cities, including New York, D.C. and L.A. (Crain's Chicago Business) | Ken Doctor: "The odds of major success seem long." (Nieman Lab)

  5. Verizon is launching a tech news site

    Just one problem with working at SugarString.com: "Other reporters, who asked not to be named, have confirmed that they have received the same recruiting pitch with the same rules: No articles about surveillance or net neutrality." (The Daily Dot)

  6. Sharyl Attkisson's loose wire

    The former CBS reporter discovered a "stray cable dangling from the FiOS box attached to the brick wall on the outside of my house," she writes in her new book, “Stonewalled: My Fight for Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation, and Harassment in Obama’s Washington." A technician removed the wire, which later vanished. (WP)

  7. Captured and tortured in Syria

    The journalist Theo Padnos recounts his nearly two years of capitivity. (NYT Magazine)

  8. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    The Daily Press of Newport News, Virginia, leads with a spectacular photo of yesterday's rocket explosion at Wallops Island. (Courtesy the Newseum)

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  9. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin

    Leigh Weingus is now trends editor at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was TV editor there. Carolyn Gregoire is now a senior writer for health and science at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was an editor at Healthy Living and Third Metric there. Lilly Workneh is now Black Voices editor at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was lifestyle editor at thegrio.com (Email) | Rich Ross is president of the Discovery Channel. Previously, he was chief executive of Shine America (The New York Times) | Monique Chenault is now executive producer of "The Insider." Previously, she was a senior producer at "Access Hollywood." (Mediabistro) | Job of the day: BuzzFeed is looking for a news fellow. Get your résumés in! (BuzzFeed) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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Why NYT avoids quoting climate-change skeptics

The New York Times

In a Times Insider interview, Adam Bryant, The New York Times’ new environment editor, answers the question “To what extent should we feel obligated to include the views of climate change skeptics?”

“Claims that the entire field of climate science is some kind of giant hoax do not hold water, and we have made a conscious decision that we are not going to take that point of view seriously,” Bryant replies. He continues:

At the same time, there is a huge amount of legitimate debate and uncertainty within mainstream science. Scientists are pretty open about not being sure how bad things will get, or how quickly. These are the valid scientific issues and uncertainties that we want to cover.

Bryant also says a recent Justin Gillis story “provides a good example of providing informed second opinions on a topic.”

In his piece, Justin quoted an expert who has often been skeptical of claimed links between weather events and global warming in the past. But in this new study we were reporting on, he said the evidence was strong. That insight is more useful to readers than quoting someone who believes the entire field of study is built on a pillar of sand.

In 2013, the Times merged its environment pod with its science desk and shuttered its Green blog. Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote last November that she found the Times had subsequently covered climate issues less, but she recently called the Times’ new enviro team “very good news.” Read more

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