Andrew Beaujon

Andrew Beaujon reports on the media for Poynter Online. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture. He lives in Alexandria, Va., with his family. His email is abeaujon@poynter.org, his phone number is 703-594-1103, and he tweets @abeaujon.


New Yorker cover artist says resemblance to August cartoon is unintentional

The New Yorker’s new cover is a beautiful, understated take on the unrest in Ferguson this past week.
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It also bears a strong resemblance to an Aug. 21 editorial cartoon by R.J. Matson. (courtesy Cagle)
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Bob Staake, who illustrated the New Yorker cover, writes on Facebook that he hadn’t before seen Matson’s cartoon.

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Daryl Cagle, who publishes the Cagle cartoons syndicate, told Poynter in an email that many New Yorker political covers follow in the footsteps of editorial cartoonists: “It would be more unusual if a New Yorker cover hadn’t been drawn by a political cartoonist first,” he wrote.

Staake also told The New Yorker’s Mina Kaneko and Francoise Mouly he used to live in St. Louis and “At first glance, one might see a representation of the Gateway Arch as split and divided, but my hope is that the events in Ferguson will provide a bridge and an opportunity for the city, and also for the country, to learn and come together.” Read more

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Fergus Bell leaves AP for startup that helps newsrooms verify content

Fergus Bell, who helped the Associated Press develop standards for verifying user-generated content, will become the head of newsroom partnerships and innovation at Social Asset Management Inc. SAM sells software to newsrooms that helps them build verification of UGC into their workflows.

“Moving to a startup was something that was pretty difficult, but I think it was a natural extension of the work I’ve been doing,” Bell said in a phone call. He’s SAM’s first employee with a news background and will visit newsrooms considering its product, as well as help his coworkers figure out what newsrooms need.

Bell will remain in London. He said SAM’s small size (he’ll be its sixth employee) was a major enticement to move from AP, where he was international social media and UGC editor — “I’m really excited to be a part of a team where an idea can come up in the morning and be executed in the afternoon,” he said.

At SAM he’ll also apply some of the thinking he’s developed as co-leader of the Online News Association’s ethics working group, which examines the ethical dimensions of gathering content from outside traditional news sources. He intends to help the company “build an ethical product” that will be mindful of both those sharing content as well as people sifting through it.

One issue: “Vicarious trauma,” he says, when journalists have to look at disturbing content. Newsrooms working with SAM can “tag that content in a newsroom so perhaps junior staff don’t have to see it if they don’t want to,” he said. Another thing: Making sure the originators of content are credited — SAM makes it easy to “bake in” credit to originators — and making sure newsrooms can communicate with them.

Yet another dimension: Considering the impact that sharing content may have on its creators. “That’s something that I’m thinking about in my ethics working group, but it’s also something I can bring to SAM,” Bell said.

SAM is not a direct competitor to Storyful, Bell said: It doesn’t verify content for newsrooms; it gives them the tools to do that themselves, and Bell may be able to help them design workflows. (One nice feature: the software allows people in the same newsroom to see what others are working on, so they don’t all descend on someone with a killer piece of UGC.)

“This is the first time that I’ll get to work with newsrooms that have audiences as well,” he said. He looks forward to seeing “how the UGC best practices that I’ve been preaching can be used.” Read more

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Jian Ghomeshi charged with sexual assault

Toronto Police Service | Toronto Star

Police in Toronto have charged former CBC radio host Jian Ghomeshi with four sexual assault counts and one of “Overcome Resistance – Choking.” He surrendered to police and is scheduled to appear in court Wednesday, the police say.

Ghomeshi withdrew a planned suit against the CBC Tuesday. The broadcaster fired him last month after it saw “graphic evidence” that he’d injured a woman in what he described as consensual rough sex.

Other women came forward with allegations against Ghomeshi, including the actor Lucy DeCoutere. Read more

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News orgs want to help fix Ferguson

Good morning. Here are eight media stories. (No newsletter tomorrow or Friday — happy Thanksgiving, and see you Monday.)

  1. News orgs seek your ideas on Ferguson

    #FergusonNext is a project from the opinion shops at The Guardian, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Ebony.com, Colorlines, The St. Louis American and Riverfront Times. (#FergusonNext) | Darren Wilson spoke with George Stephanopoulos. (ABC News) | Freelance reporters Emily Molli and Marcus DiPaola got robbed in Ferguson. (Riverfront Times) | Post-Dispatch employees covering Ferguson: Sorry, no Thanksgiving break for you. (Poynter) | Post-Dispatch front: "Smoldering"

  2. Why do people react so strongly to CNN?

    Ferguson protesters in New York last night chanted "Fuck CNN." The network showed the chants. "Hats off to CNN for showing as much of the chanting as they did," Erik Wemple writes. "But they may want to consider why it is that people seem to react so strongly to this news provider." (WP) | Maybe it's Don Lemon? A catalog of his weirdest moments. (WP)

  3. First Look kills its business publication, cans staff

    The Pierre Omidyar-backed media group dispatches Racket, the publication Matt Taibbi was supposed to edit, and its staff, with a five-sentence post. (First Look Media) | Employees of FLM talked anonymously to Chris Lehmann. Among the complaints: Everyone's salaries got posted by mistake to the company intranet, and "For all their talk about ‘iterating,’ ‘blue sky,’ and the rest," managers are "not interested in any of the difficult stuff of leadership." (In These Times) | Racket staffers who need jobs. (@pareene)

  4. Jian Ghomeshi withdraws CBC lawsuit

    Disgraced radio host will not pursue damages from his former employer, will pay CBC's legal costs. (The Globe and Mail)

  5. How to explain to your family that you work at Gawker

    J.K. Trotter: "It’s this news website thing in New York ... Um, I write about media ... It’s called Gawker. ... Yes. With a ‘G.’" (Gawker)

  6. The lines are crossing at MailOnline

    Digital ad-revenue gains at the Internet juggernaut in 2014 had the effect of "almost completely offsetting the advertising and sales decline at the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday." (The Guardian)

  7. But nothing about #grapegate?

    NYT says its Thanksgiving dishes feature had "numerous errors." (Poynter)

  8. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    The Virginian-Pilot shows Darren Wilson's red cheek. (Courtesy the Newseum)
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Ben Mullin's job moves is off till Monday. Load up his inbox in the meantime: bmullin@poynter.org. Corrections? Tips? Arguments about apple pies vs. pumpkin? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here. Read more

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NYT corrects: Thanksgiving dishes article ‘contained numerous errors’

No, it’s not backing down on #grapegate. But The New York Times found numerous other issues with its Nov. 18 “The United States of Thanksgiving” feature:

An article last Wednesday recommending a Thanksgiving dish from each state, with a recipe, contained numerous errors.

The recipe from Connecticut, for quince with cipollini onions and bacon, omitted directions for preparing the quince. It should be peeled, cored and cut into 1-inch chunks. An illustration with the West Virginia recipe, for pawpaw pudding, depicted a papaya — not a pawpaw, which is correctly depicted above. The introduction to the recipe from Arizona, for cranberry sauce and chiles, misstated the origin of Hatch chiles. They are grown in New Mexico, not in Arizona.

The introduction to the Delaware recipe, for du Pont turkey with truffled zucchini stuffing, referred incorrectly to several historical points about the Winterthur estate. It was an ancestral home of the du Pont family, not the sole one; it was established in 1837, not in 1810; the house was completed in 1839, not in 1837. The introduction also misstated the relationship of Pauline Foster du Pont to Eleuthère Irénée du Pont. Pauline was the wife of Mr. du Pont’s grandson, not his daughter-in-law.

And, finally, the label for the illustration for the nation’s capital misspelled the District of Columbia as Colombia.

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No Thanksgiving holiday for St. Louis Post-Dispatch journalists who cover Ferguson

Some journalists at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch won’t be able to take Thanksgiving off, Post-Dispatch Editor Gilbert Bailon tells Poynter.

“Only those who are directly involved in covering the Ferguson story,” Bailon writes in an email. Affected journalists work in the metro, business, photo and design and production pods. “That includes editors,” Bailon writes. “A few people already are on vacation. Features and Sports are unaffected.”

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Judge orders Connecticut publication to hold story

Connecticut Law Tribune

Stephen Frazzini, a judge in New Britain, Connecticut’s Superior Court, has forbidden Connecticut Law Tribune to publish an article, Thomas B. Scheffey reports. The article, by Isaac Avilucea, concerns a document published, apparently by mistake, on the Connecticut Judicial Branch’s website.

The Law Tribune says the order is unconstitutional prior restraint, and has filed a motion asking it be lifted. The publication’s lawyer, Daniel Klau, tells Scheffey “I am actually under a restraining order about what I can tell my own client” and that “in a child protection case on the juvenile court docket, the court granted a party’s request for an injunction barring the Connecticut Law Tribune from publishing information that it lawfully obtained about the case.”

Earlier this month a judge in Fulton County, Georgia, lifted an order that forbade news outlets from publishing a story about a school-cheating case, realizing it was made in “error.”

Avilucea, who has turned up in Poynter stories before (1, 2) said in a phone call that Monday was his last day at the Law Tribune: He’s headed to The Trentonian. Read more

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Fox News reporter talks about getting camera busted in Ferguson

Fox News reporter Steve Harrigan was covering the unrest Monday night in Ferguson, Missouri, when someone in the crowd busted his photographer’s camera.

“When we got there initally we were surrounded by eight or 10 young men calling me Darren Wilson,” Harrigan said by phone. But then glass broke on a nearby store, and that “distracted people,” Harrigan said.

Harrigan in Ferguson.

Harrigan in Ferguson.

He tried to show some of the goods getting looted when a smaller group — maybe four or five people — set upon him and camera operator Dutch Wargo. “I think there was some unhappiness we were showing looting,” Harrigan said.

One person shouted “Fuck Fox!” Another smashed the camera to the ground, disabling it. Harrigan and Wargo broadcast from iPhones while Wargo got his backup camera operating.

Steve Harrigan, who is normally based in Miami, has been in Ferguson for 11 days and also covered Ferguson in August. “Preparation was really lacking on the part of law enforcement” Monday night, he said. “It didn’t seem like they knew their opponent.” Later that night he and Wargo were near gunfire.


Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

Harrigan said how long he’d stay in Ferguson depends on the protesters. I asked him if there were other stories he reported last night more important than the busted camera. “I don’t know, I think we just try to tell what we see, and that’s a part of it,” he said. “It’s chaotic and if you step into the swirl, you could get knocked over.” Read more

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Sam Zell gets a book deal

Sam Zell’s book “GRAVEDANCER: The Art of Winning in Turbulent Times” has been sold to Portfolio, Publishers Marketplace reported Tuesday. The book is “a personal and professional memoir” with “compelling stories about his biggest deals and share tips for entrepreneurs who want to follow in his footsteps.”

Such entrepreneurs may wish to read about Zell’s foray into the media business in this 2013 Chicago Tribune series.

Sam Zell in 2007, on the occasion of his purchase of the Tribune Company. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

Sam Zell in 2007, on the occasion of his purchase of the Tribune Company. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

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NYT names Kinsey Wilson its editor for innovation and strategy

The New York Times Company

Former NPR executive Kinsey Wilson will become editor for innovation and strategy at The New York Times, the company announced Tuesday.

Wilson, who is a trustee for Poynter, left NPR in October.

At the Times he will “be in charge of expanding mobile strategy and creating new digital products inspired by Times journalism like the NYT Now and NYT Cooking apps,” the Times’ release says. Wilson will also “be the newsroom’s main liaison on digital matters to the business side of The Times Company.” Read more

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