Andrew Beaujon

Andrew Beaujon reports on the media for Poynter Online. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture. He lives in Alexandria, Va., with his family. His email is abeaujon@poynter.org, his phone number is 703-594-1103, and he tweets @abeaujon.


Why NYT avoids quoting climate-change skeptics

The New York Times

In a Times Insider interview, Adam Bryant, The New York Times’ new environment editor, answers the question “To what extent should we feel obligated to include the views of climate change skeptics?”

“Claims that the entire field of climate science is some kind of giant hoax do not hold water, and we have made a conscious decision that we are not going to take that point of view seriously,” Bryant replies. He continues:

At the same time, there is a huge amount of legitimate debate and uncertainty within mainstream science. Scientists are pretty open about not being sure how bad things will get, or how quickly. These are the valid scientific issues and uncertainties that we want to cover.

Bryant also says a recent Justin Gillis story “provides a good example of providing informed second opinions on a topic.”

In his piece, Justin quoted an expert who has often been skeptical of claimed links between weather events and global warming in the past. But in this new study we were reporting on, he said the evidence was strong. That insight is more useful to readers than quoting someone who believes the entire field of study is built on a pillar of sand.

In 2013, the Times merged its environment pod with its science desk and shuttered its Green blog. Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote last November that she found the Times had subsequently covered climate issues less, but she recently called the Times’ new enviro team “very good news.” Read more

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Sun-Times owner says it’s imitating BuzzFeed, Deadspin with national network of news sites

Chicago Sun-Times | Robert Feder

Are you ready for dc.suntimes.com? tampa.suntimes.com? newyork.suntimes.com? The Chicago paper’s owner, Wrapports LLC, announced a “mobile-first app network” Tuesday with local editions rolling out in 70 U.S. cities and, eventually, international editions.

How dc.suntimes.com looks on my phone.

How dc.suntimes.com looks on my phone.

The sites will offer aggregated content from local news sources as well as from some Sun-Times writers (the Chicago edition includes links to content from the rival Chicago Tribune). It’s part of an effort to “offer content in a manner similar to websites such as Deadspin and Buzzfeed,” Wrapports’ release says.

The sites are in beta and will officially launch on Friday. The Sun-Times Network takes the place of Aggrego, the local-content initiative Wrapports launched last year, Sun-Times spokesperson Dennis Culloton tells Poynter. Tim Landon, who cofounded Classified Ventures and led Aggrego, will run the Sun-Times Network.

Wrapports chair Michael Ferro will be board chair. The launch coincides with plans “for the company to sell all of its suburban publications — including six dailies and 32 Pioneer Press weeklies — to Tribune Publishing, parent company of the Chicago Tribune,” Robert Feder writes. “That will leave the much smaller Wrapports with only the daily Sun-Times and the free weekly [Chicago] Reader.” Read more

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USA Today, WSJ, NYT top U.S. newspapers by circulation

Alliance for Audited Media

The Alliance for Audited Media issued its last-ever six-month circulation report today. Here are the top newspapers in the U.S., by total average circulation in September 2014:

  1. USA Today (4,139,380)
  2. The Wall Street Journal (2,276,207)
  3. The New York Times (2,134,150)

AAM is discontinuing the print report in favor of more detailed, more frequent reports on individual titles. This edition doesn’t include comparisons to previous totals, which is kind, in a way, as rule changes have made comparisons to past performance, or other publications, increasingly difficult.

A peek behind those great numbers shows why. Let’s start with USA Today, whose Monday-Friday total average circulation rocketed 43 percent, from 2,876,586 to 4,139,380. Its average Monday-Friday print circulation dropped 17 percent over September 2013, from 1,316,865 to 1,083,200. But USA Today has used AAM rule changes to post astonishing circulation increases since this time last year: a 67 percent rise in September 2013, a 94 percent rise in March of this year. It counts digital editions and the “butterfly” editions that run in other Gannett-owned newspapers, for instance, which is part of the reason it now avers a Sunday circulation of 3,686,797 even though it doesn’t run a traditional edition that day.

The Journal actually saw a tiny increase in average Monday-Friday print circulation over September 2013 — a rise of 3,680 copies, or .27 percent. Its total average Monday-Friday circulation centimetered up to 2,276,207 from 2,273,767.

And the Times’ average Sunday print circulation fell 3.5 percent, to 1,181,160 from 1,224,069 in September 2013. Its average Monday-Friday print circulation fell 5.4 percent over the same period, to 639,887 from 676,633.

AAM cautions against making comparisons to past numbers while describing its rule changes this year. It previously allowed newspapers to count branded editions (which could be a lawn-delivered total market coverage product, or a Spanish-language edition, or in the case of The New York Times, the International New York Times) and digital nonreplica editions, which can include apps.

Just for the heck of it, here are a few more newspaper numbers:

The Washington Post’s average Sunday print circulation fell 5.7 percent, to 568,365 from 602,830 in September 2013. Its average Monday-Friday print circulation fell nearly 7 percent, to 377,466 from 405,035 over the same period. Its total average circulation on Sundays fell 3 percent, to 776,806 from 800,643.

The Los Angeles Times’ average Sunday print circulation fell 6.5 percent, to 685,473 from 733,101 in September 2013. Its average Monday-Friday print circulation fell nearly 7 percent over the same period, to 370,990 from 398,202. Its total average circulation on Sundays was very slightly up, to 965,598 from 963,751.

The Orange County Register, which has pursued a print-first strategy, saw its average Sunday print circulation rise 24 percent, 333,661 from 267,121 in September 2013. Read more

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Reporter declines to reapply for her job, gets laid off

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Reporter declines to reapply for her job, gets laid off Burlington Free Press reporter Lynn Monty decided not to consummate the process of reapplying for her job last week. The Free Press, like many other Gannett papers, has asked staffers to reapply for jobs in reimagined “newsrooms of the future.” “I loved my job, but I don’t love Gannett,” Monty tells Paul Heintz. “I will make a new way for myself that doesn’t compromise my integrity.” (Seven Days)
  2. The last circulation report The Alliance for Audited Media will release its final print Snapshot report today. Because of more rule changes, “we advise against comparing year-over-year data,” AAM cautions. (AAM) | I wrote last October about how some other recent rules made comparisons difficult. (Poynter)
  3. Two attempts to explain why your friend Gordon is blue over the Jian Ghomeshi mess Canadians have an ” intrinsic and profound” relationship with the CBC, and the scandal further diminishes the institution, Adam Sternbergh writes. (Vulture) | “[T]here was once a hope that people in powerful positions were trying their best to do well by the country,” Michelle Dean writes. “That is gone, and people are, I think, sad to see that they now must extend the cynicism and bad feelings to cultural figures as well.” (Gawker)
  4. John Cantlie “reports” for Islamic State The captured British journalist appears in a package purporting to be from Kobani. (The Telegraph)
  5. The dream of an iTunes for news will never die The New York Times Co. and Axel Springer led a funding round for Blendle, a Dutch startup that sells a la carte access to articles. (Gigaom) | Blendle cofounder Alexander Klöpping “says he’s in talks with U.S. publishers (he declined to name any), which tend to have few foreign subscribers and sell ads at junk rates in countries where they don’t have a sales force.” (Bloomberg Businessweek)
  6. Reporting under duress The International Women’s Media Foundation gave Solange Lusiku Nsimire, editor-in-chief of Congo’s Le Souverain, a Courage in Journalism award last week. “I want to find shelter for my children, who are very much at risk,” she tells Eleanor Klibanoff. “But as long as democracy is not established and human rights are not respected, I feel that I need to continue reporting.” (NPR) | Related: New CPJ report shows journalists are still being killed with impunity in most parts of the world. (Poynter) | Also related: At a White House Correspondents’ Association seminar Saturday, Susan Page called the Obama administration “‘more dangerous’ to the press than any other in history.” (WP) | Also related: An Israeli border policeman shot AP photographer Majdi Mohammed with rubber bullets. (AP)
  7. FBI made a fake newspaper article “The FBI in Seattle created a fake news story on a bogus Seattle Times Web page to plant software in the computer of a suspect in a series of bomb threats to Lacey’s Timberline High School in 2007.” (Seattle Times)
  8. Papa’s peepin’ peeps The annual Spy Prom in D.C. honored Ernest Hemingway. (HuffPost) | Related: Hemingway got a Nobel on this day in 1954. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare The New York Daily News uses wordplay to challenge Obama’s Ebola czar.

    NYDN-10282014  

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sarah Lumbard is now senior digital curator at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s National Institute of Holocaust Education. Previously, she was vice president of content strategy and operations at NPR. (Poynter) | Fred Santarpia will be executive vice president and chief digital officer at Condé Nast. Previously, he was executive vice president at Condé Nast Entertainment. (Poynter) | Hassan Hamdani is editor-in-chief at HuffPost Morocco. Previously, he was editor-in-chief of TelQuel’s multimedia division. (HuffPost) | Bernardo Chévez is now vice president of technology at Hearst Magazines International. Previously, he was director of engineering at Condé Nast. (Fishbowl NY) | Job of the day: The Washington Post is looking for an editorial copy editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Reporter gets joke into cemetery story

The Telegraph

The first letters in each paragraph of Joe Kovac Jr.’s Oct. 26 story in The (Macon, Georgia) Telegraph about a cemetery tour spell “A Good Time Was Had by All.”

Kovac had placed a bet on Twitter that he’d get away with the caper:

This past April Kovac called out The Daily Mail for fabricating a courtroom scene at a trial he covered. The Mail later changed its story. Read more

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Jian Ghomeshi

Toronto Star investigated sex allegations against Jian Ghomeshi

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Jian Ghomeshi leaves CBC under dramatic circumstances: The broadcaster fired the host, whose show “Q” has gained a foothold below the 49th parallel as well, citing “information” it had received about him. (CBC) | “Over the past few months the Star has approached Ghomeshi with allegations from three young women, all about 20 years his junior, who say he was physically violent to them without their consent during sexual encounters or in the lead-up to sexual encounters.” (Toronto Star) | Ghomeshi acknowledges his “tastes in the bedroom may not be palatable to some folks” and says an ex-girlfriend launched a “campaign of harassment, vengeance and demonization against me” and that one person “began colluding with a freelance writer who was known not to be a fan of mine and, together, they set out to try to find corroborators to build a case to defame me.” (Jian Ghomeshi’s Facebook) | Canadaland’s Jesse Brown says he’s been working with the Toronto Star investigating Ghomeshi. “I don’t have any interest in celebrity gossip … this was something serious, something that I felt very strongly needed to be reported. .. This whole thing has a ways to go.” (Canadaland) | Carla Ciccone “was harassed and ridiculed by Ghomeshi fans after she published a thinly disguised account of a sexual encounter with the host on XO Jane last summer.” (Gawker)
  2. Why publishers are scared of Facebook: The company wants to help publishers crack mobile, maybe even host publishers’ pages and split ad revenue, David Carr writes. The big question: “Is the coming contest between platforms and publishing companies an existential threat to journalism?” Atlantic Media owner David Bradley tells Carr. (NYT) | Sam Kirkland wrote earlier this month about how Facebook news partnerships head Liz Heron “answered for a litany of perceived sins and slights” at ONA. (Poynter) | Ravi Somaiya: “Numerous publications, including The New York Times, have met with Facebook officials to discuss how to improve their referral traffic.” (NYT)
  3. Philly papers won’t make endorsement in governor’s race: Owner Gerry Lenfest writes, “Instead of an endorsement for governor, I asked the editorial boards of both The Inquirer and the Daily News to provide a summary of where the candidates stand on the critical issues facing the state, as well as the positions each paper has taken on those issues, and then let the voters decide who they think is most qualified.” (Philly.com) | Joel Mathis: “Through all the battles … of recent years, the Inquirer and its journalists have persistently strived to maintain a reputation as a strong, independent voice in the city. Sunday’s non-endorsement undermines that effort. Sometimes it’s better to take a stand.” (Philadelphia) | Lenfest is among the top donors to Gov. Tom Corbett, who is running for reelection. (AP) | Related: The Boston Globe endorsed — gasp — a Republican in the Massachusetts gubernatorial race. (The Boston Globe) | Dan Kennedy collects the times the newspaper has endorsed Republicans. (Media Nation)
  4. Reddit’s racism problem: “A persistent, organized and particularly hateful strain of racism has emerged on the site,” Jason Abbruzzese writes. “Enabled by Reddit’s system and permitted thanks to its fervent stance against any censorship, it has proven capable of overwhelming the site’s volunteer moderators and rendering entire subreddits unusable.” (Mashable)
  5. Obama doesn’t watch cable news: “I have spent, you know, countless hours with him on Air Force One, especially, in the conference room where we always had the TV on, and it was never in any of the trips I ever took with him, tuned in to cable news,” Jay Carney tells Brian Stelter. (TVNewser)
  6. Chicago mural honors James Foley: A group of his friends “wanted the mural to be near Cafe Jumping Bean, the 18th Street coffee shop where Foley spent time writing and working,” Stephanie Lulay reports. (DNAinfo) | The horrors he and others experienced during their capitivity. (NYT)
  7. News orgs want access to Sayreville hearings: “The media organizations argue that allowing the public access to the case will provide an outlet ‘for community concern’ in the highly charged case. (AP)
  8. Headline of the day: “World Series National Anthem Botched By That Asshole From Staind” (Deadspin)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Canada’s National Post fronts the Ghomeshi mess with a very good headline: “World War Q.” (Courtesy Newseum)

    nationalpost-10272014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sam Biddle will be a senior writer at Gawker. Previously, he was co-editor of Valleywag. Nitasha Tiku, the publication’s other top editor, “will be taking over Biddle’s responsibilities.” (Business Insider) | Polina Marinova is now associate editor of audience engagement at Fortune. Previously, she was social media editor at OZY Media. (@polina_marinova) | Karen Leigh is now deputy Middle East bureau chief at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was managing editor of Syria Deeply. (@raju) | Rachel Orr will be a mobile designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was a page designer at Express. (The Washington Post) | Stephen Bohner is now a mobile producer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was an online producer for The Arizona Republic (The Washington Post) | Kyle Brinkman has been named news director for KLFY in Lafayette, Louisiana. Previously, he was news director for WEAR in Pensacola, Florida. Andrea Clenney will be news director for WLTZ in Columbus, Georgia. Previously, she was news director for WCJB in Gainesville, Florida. Jennifer Rigby is vice president of special projects for The Weather Channel. Previously, she was vice president of live programming there. Leesa Dillon is now senior executive producer at WGCL in Atlanta. Previously, she was senior executive producer at KCTV in Kansas City. (Rick Geevers) | The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette is looking for an online news editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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NBCUniversal settles intern lawsuit

Los Angeles Times

NBCUniversal will pay $6.4 million to settle a class action lawsuit brought by former interns, Daniel Miller reports in the Los Angeles Times.

The suit was originally brought last July by Jesse Moore and Monet Eliastam, who interned at MSNBC and “Saturday Night Live,” respectively, and “grew to include plaintiffs from other states,” Miller writes.

Related: Poynter’s list of paid internships

They’ll get “special bonuses,” and “a handful of plaintiffs would receive $2,000 to $10,000 each,” Miller writes. “Other unpaid interns who qualify to be included in the settlement would see far less — $505 on average, according to the legal filings.”

In 2012, Rachel Bien, a lawyer for the firm that represented Moore and Eliastam (and has helped lead the charge on lawsuits over unpaid internships), told Poynter, “The fact that interns get some benefit from the internship doesn’t mean the company doesn’t have to pay them for work that provides an advantage to the company.” Read more

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N.Y. tabs met in secret lovenest

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories, then let’s get to the weekend.

  1. A New York Post/New York Daily News collaboration? Joe Pompeo reports the rival papers had unsuccessful discussions about “a number of potential business deals that would have made unlikely bedfellows of enemy combatants.” “Many deal points were on the table,” a source tells him. Another source tells Pompeo talks about a digital-only Daily News are “not about if, they’re about when.” (Capital)
  2. Earnings: Broadcast ad revenues way up, print ad revenues down nearly 8 percent at Meredith. (MediaPost) | McClatchy had “a rocky third quarter,” plus what it called “important events that have sealed our financial flexibility” — some substantial assets sales. “An unfriendly commentator might describe those ‘events’ as a yard sale,” Rick Edmonds writes. (Poynter)
  3. Some less-than-worshipful takes on the Dave McKinney affair: His now-former Sun-Times colleague Neil Steinberg writes: “I sincerely believe that had McKinney managed to just step around this mess and gone back to doing his job, an important life skill in journalism, instead of pouring gasoline over himself, and the paper, and striking a match, the whole thing would be over by now and he’d be back to kicking [Illinois gubernatorial candidate Bruce] Rauner’s ass, which is what this is supposedly all about.” (Every goddamn day) | Erik Wemple on the “monster ethical issue” underneath all this: “Either the Sun-Times should have bumped McKinney from the race early on, or it should have run disclaimers on his stories.” (WP)
  4. AMC buys half of BBC America: The deal may help the BBC World News channel get on U.S. cable and satellite systems, Brian Stelter reports. (CNN)
  5. Guardian’s lawyer honored: The National LGBT Bar Association will honor Gill Phillips, who runs editorial legal services at Guardian News & Media Limited. The Guardian’s Edward Snowden stories were “one of many challenges the openly lesbian Phillips has faced during her tenure at the paper, which has also included breaking the phone-hacking story, The Trafigura Super Injunction Saga and the Leveson Inquiry.” (PinkNews)
  6. The Queen sent a tweet: “It is a pleasure to open the Information Age exhibition today at the @ScienceMuseum and I hope people will enjoy visiting. Elizabeth R.” (@BritishMonarchy) | Other tweets by royals. (Twitter UK) | One used an iPad: “Here’s a photo of the man who actually typed the tweet and prepared the iPad for the Queen.” (Business Insider)
  7. National Report defends bogus news reports: “We like to think we are doing a public service by introducing readers to misinformation,” National Report publisher Allen Montgomery (whose name is also fake, but let’s move on) says. Craig Silverman: “They may say this is an educational effort, but all the education has come from the other people debunking their stuff.” (Digiday)
  8. “Sometimes the size is so overwhelming, it’s hard to find a picture”: NYT photographer Ozier Muhammad takes Deborah Acosta with him on assignment as he tries to get (and transmit) photos from last month’s People’s Climate March. He finally gets an image through by hitting a Starbucks and using its WiFi. (NYT)
  9. Front page of the day, not curated by Kristen Hare: A great photo of yesterday’s solar eclipse from The Plain Dealer’s John Kuntz, with a solid headline: “Moon takes a spectacular bite out of the sun.” (Courtesy the Newseum.)

    plain-dealer-10242014  

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Callie Schweitzer has been named editorial director of audience strategy for Time Magazine and Time Inc. Previously, she was director of digital innovation at Time magazine. (Poynter) | Peter Lattman will be deputy business editor at The New York Times. Previously, he was media editor there. (The New York Times) | Paul Greenberg is chief executive officer at Nylon Media. Previously, he was CEO of CollegeHumor.com. (prnewswire.com) | Stefano Fusaro is now a sports anchor for WTVJ in Miami. Previously, he was sports director at KXLN in Houston. (TV Spy) | Roxane Gay is a columnist at Guardian U.S. She is the author of “An Untamed State” and “Bad Feminist”. Jeb Lund is a columnist at Guardian U.S. He has written for Rolling Stone, GQ and The New Republic. Trevor Timm is a columnist at Guardian U.S. He is executive director of the Freedom of the Press Foundation. Steven Thrasher is a columnist at Guardian U.S. He is a contributing editor at BuzzFeed. Jess Zimmerman is a columnist at Guardian U.S. She is a technology essayist. (Email) | Job of the day: Euclid Media Group is looking for an editor-in-chief for the San Antonio Current. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Callie Schweitzer named editorial director for audience strategy at Time Inc.

Time Inc. has named Callie Schweitzer its editorial director for audience strategy, Time Managing Editor Nancy Gibbs and Time Inc. EVP Todd Larsen tell staffers in a memo (below).

Schweitzer joined Time last August after hitches at Vox Media and Talking Points Memo. In her new role she’ll “continue to oversee the social team, editorial technology, content partnerships and newsletters at TIME while working on a variety of digital initiatives at the corporate level,” the memo says.

RELATED: Fortune magazine triples amount of online content even as Time Inc. cuts costs

We are delighted to announce that Callie Schweitzer has been named Editorial Director, Audience Strategy for TIME and Time Inc.

In a remarkably short time, Callie has come to play a unique role across departments, and, increasingly, across brands at Time Inc. Though based in TIME editorial, she has from almost day one worked with executives and editors throughout the company to help identify new digital opportunities and expand our existing audiences.

This promotion for Callie formalizes that role. She will continue to oversee the social team, editorial technology, content partnerships and newsletters at TIME while working on a variety of digital initiatives at the corporate level. She will have a dual report to Time Inc. Chief Content Officer Norman Pearlstine and to Time.com Managing Editor Edward Felsenthal.

Since joining TIME last year, Callie has been a key leader on the team driving the expansion of Time.com. In overseeing the social team, she has led the site to a record 20 million monthly social referrals, a 227% increase over last year. TIME’s combined social followings now exceed 20 million, the largest at Time Inc. Its daily newsletter, The Brief, has more than 600,000 subscribers with open rates averaging 40%, nearly twice the industry average.

Prior to joining Time Inc., Callie was Director of Marketing and Communications at Vox Media, publisher of The Verge, SB Nation and Polygon. There, she helped introduce and launch Polygon, the video game vertical, and Vox Creative, an in-house creative services wing. Before that, Callie was Deputy Publisher of Talking Points Memo, responsible for mobile, video and content partnerships and increasing audience growth. She has written for a variety of outlets. Named two years in a row as one of Forbes‘ 30 Under 30 in Media, Callie is a Summa Cum Laude graduate of USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism—and was for two summers an intern at People.

Please join us in wishing Callie every success in her new role.

Best,

Nancy and Todd

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Former AP editor sues over dismissal that followed retracted story

Style Weekly

Dena Potter has filed suit against the Associated Press, saying “she was unjustly fired for an error in a story edited by another staffer,” Ned Oliver reports for Style Weekly.

Potter was Bob Lewis’ editor in Richmond, Virginia, but says in the suit she did not work on the story that led to his dismissal, which claimed that then gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe lied during a federal investigation.

AP retracted the story. AP fired Potter, Lewis and another editor, Norm Gomlak.

Potter’s suit says Gomlak and Lewis worked on the story, and that she was “busy working with a reporter on another story, a shooting at a courthouse in West Virginia,” Oliver reports. She is seeking damages of $950,000 plus court costs, he writes.

Reached via email, AP spokesperson Paul Colford had no comment. Read more

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