Andrew Beaujon

Andrew Beaujon reports on the media for Poynter Online. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture. He lives in Alexandria, Va., with his family. His email is abeaujon@poynter.org, his phone number is 703-594-1103, and he tweets @abeaujon.


Copy editors will love Weird Al’s new song

OK, copy editors. Put down the red pencils. Loosen the top buttons of your cardigans. Give “Weird Al” Yankovic three minutes and 46 seconds of your day, and in his new song “Word Crimes,” he will discuss:

  • The difference between “less” and “fewer”
  • How to discern between “its” and “it’s”
  • Why irony and coincidence are different things
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Margaret Low Smith leaves NPR for The Atlantic

NPR senior vice president for news Margaret Low Smith will join the Atlantic as a vice president and the president of the Atlantic’s events division, according to a press release Tuesday. Her departure “will be a hard parting,” NPR chief content officer Kinsey Wilson told staffers in a note (below).

Smith joined NPR in 1982. She’s been in charge of news since 2011. She got that job officially the next year. In 2012, Smith talked with Poynter about NPR’s Ethics Handbook, which emerged after a turbulent period at the radio network.

Chris Turpin will be acting head of news, Wilson tells staffers. The organization “will announce plans for a permanent search as soon they are finalized,” NPR spokesperson Isabel Lara tells Poynter in an email.… Read more

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How Jim Brady plans to make money in local

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Was SI’s LeBron James scoop legit? Sam Kirkland rounds up some thinkination from thinkinators and notes that SND’s Rob Schneider said the NYT’s celebrated sports section front on Saturday was inaccurate — James hadn’t signed at the time. (Poynter) | The “item did move on the sports AP wire, exactly as presented,” Margaret Sullivan writes. “I guess I can see his point, but it’s too literal,” Benjamin Hoffman, who designed the page, told her. (NYT) | James decided to go to SI rather than ESPN because 2010′s “The Decision” “upset America’s collective stomach and spoiled his reputation as a basketball god,” Robert Weintraub writes. “The average fan could read his moving, sincere announcement on SI.com and subconsciously think, Maybe it was ESPN’s fault, not LeBron’s, all along.” (CJR) | The “trade rumor — shorthand here for any offseason transaction news — has become the dominant form of NBA journalism.” (Grantland)
  2. How Jim Brady plans to make money in local: His Philly news startup Brother.ly will use a “mix of advertising, events and memberships,” Joe Pompeo reports.
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Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward during a period of brighter employment outlook. (AP Photo)

Newspaper reporter makes ‘endangered jobs’ list

CareerCast

Travel agent. Meter reader. Newspaper reporter.

They’re all among CareerCast’s 2014 list of endangered jobs, with the hiring outlook for newspaper reporter positions expected to drop 13 percent by 2022, according to the company’s forecast. … Read more

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David Plotz: ‘What am I gonna do, die here?’

David Plotz’s decision to step down as Slate’s editor was deeply disappointing for professional media-watchers like me: No rumors of newsroom drama. No reports of clashes with the brass. Just a cheery goodbye note and the assurance “I’m not leaving for any secret reason.”

Reached by phone, Plotz said twice that he’s had a “wonderful time” atop Slate’s masthead. “There’s a person who can edit the magazine better than I can,” he said of newly named editor Julia Turner. His resignation was effective today, Plotz said. Turner’s in charge, and Plotz is now an editor-at-large with an amorphous portfolio: “It’s one of those titles you create because you’re not exactly sure what the person does,” he said. … Read more

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agsulzberger-small

NYT names Arthur Gregg Sulzberger an editor in charge of strategy

The New York Times Monday named Arthur Gregg Sulzberger its senior editor for strategy. Sulzberger led the Times’ “innovation report.” He’s in his early 30s and is the son of Times Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr. “There’s also a good chance he’ll be running the place some day,” Joe Pompeo wrote in June.

Sulzberger in 2009. (Photograph by Ruth Fremson/The New York Times)

Memo from Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet follows: … Read more

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Slate names Julia Turner EIC

The New York Times | Slate

Julia Turner is the new editor-in-chief of Slate. David Plotz, the site’s current top editor, is stepping down, Leslie Kaufman reports.

Plotz may “start a new operation for Graham Holdings, the parent company of Slate,” Kaufman writes. Turner will be based in New York. Plotz was based in D.C.

“I’m not leaving for any secret reason,” Plotz writes in a farewell note. “Maybe it’s the rule of six: Mike [Kinsley] edited Slate for six years. Jacob [Weisberg] edited Slate for six years. I’ve been editing Slate for six years, and I’m ready to try something new.”… Read more

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Former LAT Editor Russ Stanton joins PR firm

Los Angeles Times | LA Observed

Russ Stanton is joining the communications firm G.F. Bunting + Co., Abby Sewell reports in the Los Angeles Times. Stanton most recently oversaw the newsroom at KPCC, which he left in June. He was editor of the Los Angeles Times for four years. … Read more

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White House is transparent, says White House

CNN | SPJ

The Obama administration has “absolutely” lived up to its pledge to be transparent, White House press secretary Josh Earnest told CNN’s Brian Stelter Sunday. “I think the president’s record of transparency stands up to any of the records of his predecessors,” Earnest said.

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Polk Awards

Did the government throw shade on latest Greenwald scoop?

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. Also, from Sam Kirkland, your digital morning stuff, and from Kristen Hare, a look at journalism outside the U.S.

  1. Did the government try to stink up Glenn Greenwald’s latest story? The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee’s national president, Samer Khalaf, says “It wasn’t that they were saying it was false. They were saying they can’t respond to a story that wasn’t out yet.” (The Washington Post) | The Intercept “began hearing about Justice Department officials attempting to discredit our story long before that [ADC] meeting took place.” (The Intercept) | Related: Bart Gellman answers objections to his latest NSA story, which he wrote with Julie Tate and Ashkan Soltani. (The Washington Post)
  2. Remembering John Seigenthaler, who died Friday: The Tennessean’s package | Former Poynter President Karen Dunlap remembers Seigenthaler.
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