Posts by Ed Sherman

About Ed Sherman

Sherman wrote for the Chicago Tribune for 27 years covering the 1985 Bears Super Bowl season, the White Sox, college football, golf and sports media. Sherman also penned a sports business blog for Crain’s Chicago Business and currently blogs at ShermanReport.com, as well as writing for the Chicago Tribune and the National Sports Journalism Center at Indiana University.
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In Olympics coverage, NBC News will have to balance the good and the bad

Michele Tafoya executed what can only be termed as a pre-emptive strike. The veteran sports reporter was assigned to moderate a session with NBC Sports Chairman Mark Lazarus Monday during the big media gathering to highlight the network’s coverage of the upcoming Olympics in Rio. All the heavy hitters were there, including Brian Roberts, the CEO and chairman of Comcast. Read More
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Why is ESPN covering e-sports? 'It has everything our fanbase is interested in'

There were these headlines and stories on ESPN.com Wednesday. “Behind the ID: Zachary 'Sneaky' Scuderi" “ANTi: I'm so good at 'Smash 4' that I feel like I'd be wasting talent not to take it seriously" Tokido on Infiltration after CEO 2016: "I could read his mind" If you went “huh, what?” in reaction to those stories, you … Read More
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Can The Ringer thrive outside the ESPN mothership?

It is time to see if that old real estate adage, “Location, location, location” applies to Bill Simmons. Simmons believes it won’t when it comes to his new site, The Ringer. This effort, dubbed Grantland 2.0 by observers, recently made its debut as part of his mortal quest to show he can reach a mass audience without the … Read More
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How Frank Deford, the master of going long, learned to write short

Frank Deford became a legend by writing glorious longform features for Sports Illustrated. He could pump out 1,200 words before taking a breath. Yet since 1980, Deford has become better known to a large audience of radio listeners for stories that come in at just under 500 words. For a generation and more, Deford has been a Wednesday morning … Read More
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The Undefeated is impressive, but not radical, on opening day

The Undefeated also could be called The Unconventional. At least, that's the plan laid out by Editor-in-Chief Kevin Merida. During many interviews, including one with Poynter, Merida repeatedly articulated The Undefeated’s motto: “Not conventional. Never boring.” The Undefeated, which has been in the works since 2013, finally made its long-awaited debut Tuesday. The new ESPN site, aimed at finding … Read More
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Video reveals vile online attacks on female sports reporters

If you haven’t seen the video, you are in a growing minority. Take a moment and join the nearly 3.3 million people who have watched “#MoreThanMean” on YouTube. More than a week has passed since this highly important video was posted, and the participants still are overwhelmed by the fallout. “We didn’t think it would explode the way it … Read More
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Chicago Blackhawks beat writer on coming out: ‘Nothing’s changed’

When I talked to Chris Hine last week about being a gay sportswriter, I asked if he ever heard any homophobic slurs in a pro team locker room, where the language often is politically incorrect. Hine. (Image via Twitter) “I can’t recall when someone said something that made me feel uncomfortable,” said Hine, the Chicago Tribune’s beat writer for the … Read More
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After 6 decades, Dan Jenkins is still covering the Masters — and having a blast

To put Dan Jenkins’ longevity in perspective, Jordan Spieth’s parents weren’t born when he covered his first Masters. Jenkins is back at Augusta National, where he has spent more than a year of his life. This week marks his 66th Masters, a run dating back to 1951 when Ben Hogan won his first green jacket. Jenkins, 86, continues to write … Read More
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Credentials come first for Alison Overholt, the first female editor of a major U.S. sports magazine

Alison Overholt never expected to make this kind of history. Not in 2016. When Overholt was named editor of ESPN The Magazine in February, research revealed that she is the first woman to be editor of a national, general-interest sports magazine. (Sports Illustrated for Women, which lasted from 1999-2002, did have women editors). Overholt’s groundbreaking promotion seems hard to … Read More
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John Feinstein's secret to developing relationships? Hanging around.

Imagine how history would have been different. John Feinstein actually first approached Dean Smith, not Bob Knight, for the book that became “A Season on the Brink.” After North Carolina won the national title in 1982, Feinstein, then a young reporter for The Washington Post, pitched the idea of doing a behind-the-scenes examination of Smith and his program. Smith … Read More
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Rachel Nichols returns to ESPN, and she isn't pulling punches

As reputations go in journalism, it doesn’t get much better than being known as a reporter who asks tough questions. That’s the common narrative in stories about Rachel Nichols. Sports Illustrated once called her “the country's most impactful and prominent female sports journalist” because of her ability to ask tough-but-fairs. A recent GQ profile featured the headline: “Rachel … Read More
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The game plan for Adrian Wojnarowski's new site? Break stories, and readers will follow

Adrian Wojnarowski was working at 2:30 a.m. on a Sunday morning, because that’s what he does. He received a tip that the Phoenix Suns just fired coach Jeff Hornacek. The timing couldn’t have been better for his recently launched NBA site on Yahoo Sports, The Vertical with Woj. Wojnarowski woke up Joe Garza, the site’s managing editor. “I apologized … Read More
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The secret to covering the Super Bowl? Break away from the pack

A new book has a telling passage that shows how much the media and the Super Bowl has changed. In "When It Was Just A Game: Remembering the First Super Bowl," author Harvey Frommer writes about what passed for media day prior to the Green Bay-Kansas City game in Los Angeles in 1967. The reporters were invited to the … Read More
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How 2 Washington Post journalists blew open excess spending in college sports

This is low-hanging fruit for reporters who cover a college sports program at public universities. Make that expensive fruit. If they haven't already, reporters should make an open-records request to gain access to the financial report of their school's athletic department that gets filed annually to the NCAA. In many cases, the numbers will be illuminating, if not eye-popping. "These … Read More
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These will be the 5 biggest sports journalism stories in 2016

The best part of this business always is dealing with the unknown. At some point this year, stories will explode that nobody expected. Major issues and controversies will grab everyone’s attention, requiring swift reaction and analysis. So be prepared. Until then, here are a few things to watch for in sports journalism at the dawn of 2016. Undefeated: This will … Read More