Posts by Jeff Sonderman

About Jeff Sonderman

Jeff Sonderman (jsonderman@poynter.org) is the Digital Media Fellow at The Poynter Institute. He focuses on innovations and strategies for mobile platforms and social media in online news. In addition to training journalists and writing for Poynter.org, he manages the development of Poynter-related mobile apps including Help! For Writers and Settle It! PolitiFact's Argument Ender. He is also currently an adjunct faculty teaching digital journalism at Georgetown University. Find ways to follow him at jeffsonderman.com/connect

How Flipboard just created 50 million magazine editors

Inside Flipboard | All Things D | Giga Om If you wanted to draw up a plan for drastically remaking the landscape of mobile news discovery, it might look something like this: 1) Release a beautiful news aggregating app that attracts 50 million readers, then 2) Empower those readers as curators who can create thousands of hand-picked digital magazines. Flipboard, one of the most popular news-reading mobile apps, has just done that. It is shifting its focus toward empowering users to create their own curated "magazines" for others to read. "Now everyone can be a reader and an editor," a company blog post says. Read More

'Let Me Tweet That For You' site raises concerns for journalists

This tweet looks pretty real, doesn't it? It's not, though. I faked that tweet using a Web service named "Let Me Tweet That For You." It's pretty simple -- you type in a Twitter username and a message, and it generates a realistic-looking image of a tweet from that person. It even adds fake retweet and favorite counts to lend some more credibility. The site is a project of OKFocus, a New York-based marketing agency. It's actually about a year old, but has been somehow rediscovered this week and is really taking off on Twitter. Read More

The Daily Caller's Menendez prostitution 'scoop' unravels

The Daily Caller, Tucker Carlson's conservative version of Huffington Post, is at the center of a media controversy. And loving it. In November, the Caller published a story based on two anonymous Dominican women claiming that New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez had paid them for sex. ABC News says it received similar information at the same time, as Republican operatives organized interviews with those two women, plus a third woman the Caller did not talk to, all of whom said the senator paid them for sex. But ABC News didn't run with the story, because "none of the women could produce identity cards with their names, and they all provided the same story almost word for word, as if they had been coached." After the Caller's story was published, things started to unravel. Read More