Kristen Hare


Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 9.11.26 PM

Ben Bradlee dead at 93

FILE - In this June 21, 1971 file photo, Washington Post Executive Director Ben Bradlee and Post Publisher Katharine Graham leave U.S. District Court in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to the Washington Post. (AP Photo, File)

FILE – In this June 21, 1971 file photo, Washington Post Executive Director Ben Bradlee and Post Publisher Katharine Graham leave U.S. District Court in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to the Washington Post. (AP Photo, File)

The Washington Post | The New Yorker | Time

Ben Bradlee, editor of The Washington Post from 1965 to 1991, died on Tuesday at 93 of natural causes, former managing editor Robert G. Kaiser wrote for the Post.

Bradlee’s time as editor of the Post included coverage of Watergate and the Pentagon Papers — still some of journalism’s biggest stories.

During his tenure, a paper that had previously won just four Pulitzer Prizes, only one of which was for reporting, won 17 more, including the Public Service award for the Watergate coverage.

“Ben Bradlee was the best American newspaper editor of his time and had the greatest impact on his newspaper of any modern editor,” said Donald E. Graham, who succeeded his mother as publisher of The Post and Mr. Bradlee’s boss.

“So much of The Post is Ben,” Mrs. Graham said in 1994, three years after Bradlee retired as editor. “He created it as we know it today.”

David Remnick wrote about Bradlee’s death for The New Yorker.

Recently, Tom Zito, a feature writer and critic at the Post during the Bradlee era, told me this story:

“One afternoon in the fall of 1971, I was summoned to Ben’s office. I was the paper’s rock critic at the time. A few minutes earlier, at the Post’s main entrance, a marshal from the Department of Justice had arrived, bearing a grand-jury subpoena in my name. As was the case ever since the Department of Justice and the Post had clashed over the Pentagon Papers, earlier that year, rules about process service dictated that the guard at the front desk call Bradlee’s office, where I was now sitting and being grilled about the business of the grand jury and its potential impact on the paper. I explained that my father was of Italian descent, lived in New Jersey, had constructed many publicly financed apartment buildings—and was now being investigated by the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York regarding income-tax evasion. ‘Your father?’ Ben exclaimed in disbelief, and then called out to his secretary, ‘Get John Mitchell on the phone.’ In less than a minute, the voice of the Attorney General could be heard on the speaker box, asking, somewhat curtly, ‘What do you want, Ben?’ In his wonderfully gruff but patrician demeanor, and flashing a broad smile to me, Ben replied, ‘What I want is for you to never again send a subpoena over here asking any of my reporters to give grand-jury testimony about their parents. And if you do, I’m going to personally come over there and shove it up your ass.’ The subpoena was quashed the next day.”

The Post has quotes on Bradlee from a number of its stars, including Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.

“Ben was a true friend and genius leader in journalism. He forever altered our business. His one unbending principle was the quest for the truth and the necessity of that pursuit. He had the courage of an army. Ben had an intuitive understanding of the history of our profession, its formative impact on him and all of us. But he was utterly liberated from that. He was an original who charted his own course. We loved him deeply, and he will never be forgotten or replaced in our lives.”

On October 3, Jill Abramson, former executive editor of The New York Times, wrote about Bradlee for Time, including how he weathered the scandal after it was revealed that Pulitzer winner Janet Cooke made up the work that won her that Pulitzer.

During that time Ben showed what he was made of. He had to return a Pulitzer Prize that Cooke had won about a made up 8-year-old heroin addict. He had to invite his boss, Donald Graham, to have breakfast at his house and tell him that he and his vaunted team of all-stars, made famous in the movie All the President’s Men, had failed the Graham family. He had to face his own crushed newsroom and, ultimately, the Post’s disappointed readers.

This would surely have brought down any other editor. So why did Ben Bradlee survive and triumph? It wasn’t simply because he was so powerful or well connected, having transformed the Post during Watergate into a national newspaper and showcase for the blazingly talented writers he hired and nurtured. Bob Woodward tried to explain Ben’s durability after the top editors at the Times lost their jobs in the Jayson Blair scandal. “Bradlee was a great editor and loved by everybody,” Woodward said. “Not just the people who knew him well, but down the ranks.”

On Tuesday night, journalists shared quotes from Bradlee on Twitter.


Ben Bradlee, former executive editor of The Washington Post, seated during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. Bradlee died on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Ben Bradlee, former executive editor of The Washington Post, seated during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. Bradlee died on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 4.20.13 PM

Poynter’s News University to host a live conversation on covering Ebola

Nurse Barbara Smith practices proper hand hygiene while demonstrating the the use of personal protective equipment when dealing with Ebola during an education session in New York, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Thousands of participants, mostly health care workers, attended the session to review basic facts about Ebola and updated guidelines for protection against its spread. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Nurse Barbara Smith practices proper hand hygiene while demonstrating the the use of personal protective equipment when dealing with Ebola during an education session in New York, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Thousands of participants, mostly health care workers, attended the session to review basic facts about Ebola and updated guidelines for protection against its spread. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Poynter’s News University will host a live conversation at 10:30 a.m. Eastern on Thursday, October 23, on covering Ebola.

The discussion, which is free, includes Poynter’s Kelly McBride and Tom Huang with The Dallas Morning News. I’ll be hosting the conversation.

Questions we’ll take on include the following (from the conversation’s description):

How to cover the topic with context and accuracy
How to debunk myths about the Ebola virus
How to find untold stories
Ways you can localize the story for your community

What do you want to know about covering Ebola? Email me or tweet questions and I’ll try and work them in. An archived replay will be available after the session. You can follow the conversation on Twitter with #CoveringEbola. For more, visit News University’s Covering Ebola page.

And here’s a quick look at some of the ways we’ve covered Ebola so far at Poynter.

The readers’ quick guide for understanding a medical crisis

When writing about Ebola, what images should you use?

Journalists struggle to balance reporting on Ebola with HIPAA

From Dallas, 5 tips on covering Ebola

How journalists covering the Ebola outbreak try to stay safe


!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

How a Florida reporter got Jack Kerouac’s last interviews

Tampa Bay Times

Last year, the Tampa Bay Times (which Poynter owns) reran this story by reporter Jack McClintock, who spent time with Jack Kerouac in St. Petersburg, Florida, where Kerouac was living with his mother. The article ran on Oct. 12, 1969. Kerouac died on Oct. 21, 45 years ago today. “According to Kevin Hayes, author of the book Conversations With Jack Kerouac, McClintock’s interviews were Kerouac’s last,” the story says.

McClintock returned to Kerouac’s home several times to report the story. Here’s the end of that piece:

Kerouac wanted to talk about the article he had written, which was selling rather well to Sunday magazines in major cities in the U.S.

“It’s about the Communist conspiracy,” he said. He eyed the reporter narrowly, and when satisfied with the lack of response, began to read. The article was typed on yellow legal paper. He read with broad, wild gestures, grinning and mugging and assuming various foreign accents. The voice went up high, dropped confidentially low. It sped along, it dragged portentously. And the words had an unusual eloquence, the allusions were astonishingly erudite, the sounds made a lush and rich cadence, all coming from this man with bare feet and two days’ growth of salt-and-pepper whiskers.

It was a wondrous performance, so much so that the reporter came away without the vaguest notion of what the article might have been about.

“I’m glad to see you ’cause I’m very lonesome here,” he said, and then talked for a moment about the proposed new novel.

“Stories of the past,” said Jack Kerouac. “My story is endless. I put in a teletype roll, you know, you know what they are, you have them in newspapers, and run it through there and fix the margins and just go, go – just go, go, go.”

Author Jack Kerouac laughs during a 1967 visit to the home of a friend in Lowell, Mass. (AP Photo/Stanley Twardowicz)

Author Jack Kerouac laughs during a 1967 visit to the home of a friend in Lowell, Mass. (AP Photo/Stanley Twardowicz)

In March of last year, Times’ reporter Ben Montgomery wrote about the house in St. Pete where Kerouac lived.

There’s not much left of Kerouac here, save some stories and old acquaintances and a favorite bar stool or two. And this house.

His mother died not long after Jack, and Stella passed in 1990, but the house has been mostly empty of humans since the ’70s. To walk inside is to be transported back 40 years. Tchotchkes from the era line the shelves. A ’72 Chevy Caprice sits on flats in the two-car garage. A Reader’s Digest from September 1967 sits on the record cabinet. A 1969 telephone directory for Lowell, Mass., is shelved on Kerouac’s desk in the bedroom. A Boone’s Farm box is in a closet. An official mayoral proclamation for “Jack Kerouac Day” in Lowell, Mass., hangs on one wall, near a Buddha statue and a crucifix.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

Heat mag to Jessica Biel: Sorry we made up your quotes. Also that JT ‘gets flirty’

The Guardian | Irish Times

Jessica Biel and Justin Timberlake settled a defamation suit with a celebrity magazine in Ireland, The Guardian reported on Tuesday. A September edition of Heat quotes Biel and writes about Timberlake’s behavior at a nightclub in Paris. Irish Times reports that Heat is published by Bauer Consumer Media, a German company.

From The Guardian:

In the agreed statement read in the high court, a lawyer for the Bauer group admitted the article – headlined “Justin Timberlake gets flirty with another woman, “It is not his wife!” and “The flirty photos that rocked Justin and Jessica’s marriage” – was based on an unfounded report.

The article also included purported statements improperly attributed to Biel which the publishers said Heat now understands the actor never made.

Irish Times reported that the couple was satisfied with the ruling. And don’t mess with their marriage.

(Solicitor Paul Tweed) said the couple will not be making any further comment in relation to the matter. However, he added, they will “not hesitate to take similar legal action if false allegations regarding the state of their marriage are repeated”.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 3.00.35 PM

When writing about Ebola, what images should you use?

Lately, I’ve noticed the predominance two kinds of images with stories about Ebola — the virus itself and people in hazmat suits. I’ve used both for stories myself and wondered about the tone and message they’re sending. Unlike what we’ve seen from West Africa, in the U.S. there aren’t a lot of images of the two people with confirmed cases of Ebola. There are, mostly, press conferences, people in hazmat suits and the virus itself. It feels almost sci-fi.

Here are three front pages from Friday that show the Ebola virus super up close, via Newseum:

CA_SDUT

Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 6.51.45 AM

AUS_CM

On Tuesday, I tweeted this front, from the Times-Journal in Fort Payne, Alabama:

Earlier this month, I wrote about front pages from around the world that showed masked cleanup crews and health care workers.

The New York Daily News offered both the virus and the hazmat. Also Sofia Vergara sans pants.

ny_daily_news.750 (1)

So, with the practical need for images online and in print, what images should news organizations show while reporting on Ebola?

Kelly McBride, Poynter’s vice president of academic programs and media ethicist, says to also look at the whole package you’re presenting and the message it sends.

“A blowup image of a big scary virus, people in hazmat suits, alarming words in the headline, all that can overwhelm a completely reasonable story,” she said in an email. “Pushing out mobile alerts that scream: ‘More contagion, another person falls ill,’ make people think that they have to act now. Editors have a duty to envision how a reasonable consumer will respond. What information does that consumer really need first and foremost?”

“When it comes to images, I believe journalists (writers, photographers, page designers and editors) need to be responsible – as I hope they would in any situation,” said Andrew Seaman, a medical journalist with Reuters and the ethics chair of the Society of Professional Journalists, in an email. “The images must tell the story accurately. For example, the image should probably not be that of a person suffering with Ebola in a small Liberian medical center if the story is specifically about what is happening in Texas. Instead, it would be more appropriate to show images of the patients walking onto the planes carrying them to Maryland. Or, it could be of the well-wishers outside the hospital as the patients drive by in ambulances. The experience of people with Ebola in Liberia is – for the most part – much different than the experience of patients in the U.S.”

I sent Seaman two of the front pages from Friday, the San Diego Union-Tribune and The New York Daily News, and he doesn’t think either crossed an ethical line, “because images from a microscope can be shown in different ways,” he said. “Headlines, of course, are another matter.”

Most people get that Ebola is a serious medical condition, he said.

“Journalists shouldn’t pander to that fear or anxiety by including the most shocking or ominous images they find. The SPJ Code of Ethics applies to photography as it would to any other form of journalism. The images should reflect the truth – as should the other pieces of journalism it accompanies.”

Previously: Journalists struggle to balance reporting on Ebola with HIPAA

Why AP isn’t moving stories for every suspected Ebola case

From Dallas, 5 tips on covering Ebola
Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Why AP isn’t moving stories for every suspected Ebola case

On Friday, the Associated Press posted an advisory to editors about suspected cases of Ebola, which they’re hearing of more and more.

“The AP has exercised caution in reporting these cases and will continue to do so,” the advisory reads.

Here’s the rest:

Most of these suspected cases turn out to be negative. Our bureaus monitor them, but we have not been moving stories or imagery simply because a doctor suspects Ebola and routine precautions are taken while the patient is tested. To report such a case, we look for a solid source saying Ebola is suspected and some sense the case has caused serious disruption or reaction. Are buildings being closed and substantial numbers of people being evacuated or isolated? Is a plane being diverted? Is the suspected case closely related to another, confirmed Ebola case?

When we do report a suspected case, we will seek to keep our stories brief and in perspective.

The AP issued similar guidance on October 3. My colleague Sam Kirkland wrote about it then.

Often the fact of an unconfirmed case isn’t worth a story at all. On several occasions already, in the U.S. and abroad, we have decided not to report suspected cases. We’ve just stayed in touch with authorities to monitor the situation.

Ebola is capitalized, just a reminder. You probably know how to pronounce it by now.


!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); Read more

Tools:
4 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 11.04.52 AM

‘Having trouble pooping?’ and other awful PR pitches

    We get public relations pitches pretty much all the time, right? Sometimes they’re random. Sometimes really pushy. Sometimes they lead to great stories. And sometimes they feel like they came from bots.

    Earlier this week, I asked for people’s best-worst PR pitches.

    Here’s what I heard:

    The title for that one, by the way, is “Final Advisory to Mankind Final Warning to All Human Beings.”

    On Facebook, Catharin Shepard with The News-Journal in Raeford, North Carolina, wrote this:

    Last week I received in the mail a roughly 100-page manifesto that, as far as I could tell, compared Scientology to the Third Reich and used information from various psychological institutes and authorities to make a case that it is not a real religion. However, it was difficult to tell for certain, because it was written in what I guessed was either German or Dutch. To put this in perspective, I’m a reporter for a small-town newspaper in rural North Carolina.

    And Jen Kopf, a home and garden writer for LancasterOnline in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, shared the best of the best-worst:

    “This week’s winner: ‘”Having trouble pooping?’”

    I spoke with Kopf via email, and she’s digging through her deleted files for that pitch. I’ll share more when I get it. You are now free to make bathroom jokes. And send more bad pitches if you got ‘em. I’ll keep adding.

    paper ball waste paper bin office business


    !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs');

Read more
Tools:
2 Comments

In Hong Kong, Apple Daily gets to deliver papers after days of blockades

Wall Street Journal | The Huffington Post | Committee to Protect Journalists

Readers in Hong Kong should get their copy of the pro-democracy newspaper Apple Daily on Friday.

For several days, “mobs have surrounded Apple Daily’s offices to intimidate staff and prevent distribution of the paper,” the Wall Street Journal wrote in an opinion piece on Tuesday.

Early Monday morning they blocked delivery trucks from exiting the complex by parking a tractor-trailer across the gate. Apple Daily staff eventually used a crane to load newspapers onto different trucks across a back wall, so newsstands got copies after a delay of about six hours.

This tweet, from the Journal’s Isabella Steger, says the papers made it out on Thursday night.

And from Bloomberg’s Fion Li:

On Monday, Apple Daily posted this image on its Facebook page, with an apology to readers who didn’t get their newspapers.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

On Wednesday, Matt Sheehan wrote for Huffington Post’s The World Post about blocked deliveries and the paper itself.

With one of the largest readerships in Hong Kong, Apple Daily is known for its defiant pro-democracy positions, shrill and sensational reporting style, and occasionally lax standards for fact-checking.

The paper is run by brash media mogul Jimmy Lai, a man who makes no secret of his deep loathing for the Chinese government. As a 12-year-old, Lai smuggled himself out of famine-stricken China in 1960 and into Hong Kong. There, he went on to build a clothing and media empire that he now deploys in a running grudge match with Beijing. His paper subsidizes pro-democracy advertisements and has in the past printed two-page spreads that can serve as anti-government banners at protests.

While some local journalists cringe at what they see as the paper’s affinity for gossip and sex scandals, they say it remains one of the few bulwarks against a creeping pro-Beijing influence in Hong Kong media.

Sheehan includes this video from Wednesday, with Apple Daily employees and anti-occupy protesters.

On Thursday, Bob Dietz wrote for the Committee to Protect Journalists about “Hong Kong’s media battlefield”, including how journalists have been treated. Dietz also writes that while the Apple Daily has been physically blocked, it has had to fight online, too.

Tuesday, spokesman Mark Simon told a reporter who has been working with CPJ, “More disturbing to us than the street protests is the continued denial of service attacks on our website. At times they bring down our website for up to an hour.”

Who is carrying out the attacks? “We always had a good firewall, which we have improved upon. That makes us think the attacks on us are of a governmental scale. Our audience tends to be local and across the border. We certainly believe attacks are coming from the entity that would most benefit from silencing Next Media [Apple's parent company]. That’s what we’ll say on the matter,” Simon said.

Here’s a Twitter list of journalists covering the protests in Hong Kong. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

From Poynter, an innovator in residence, a scholarship for women leaders and more

The Poynter Institute announced three new initiatives on Thursday — innovator in residence, a scholarship for women in leadership and The Frank E. Duckwall Foundation Community Conversations @ Poynter.

According to the press release, the three programs support Poynter’s new direction by aiming “to build and share thought leadership with the community, to ignite innovation and to promote and advance women in journalism leadership and media innovation.” The three initiatives are funded through private funding. Two women were awarded the scholarship on Monday, October 13th — Amanda Wilkins, senior digital editor for the Dallas Morning News, and Sara Hebel, assistant managing editor for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Both women received the scholarships to attend Poynter’s Leadership Academy.

The Innovator in Residence program will “help bring a visionary, dynamic thought leader to advise Poynter faculty on how to best meet journalism’s need to be nimble, inclusive and dynamic in unprecedented ways in a continuously shifting media landscape,” according to the release. The position is expected to begin in January of 2015.

The Women in Leadership Scholarship “will provide women with the opportunity to advance their leadership roles and to grow the scope, influence and impact of women leaders in journalism and the media.”

And The Frank E. Duckwall Foundation Community Conversations @ Poynter, which gets support from the Frank E. Duckwall Foundation, will bring a series of public conversations to Poynter “as an interactive public dialogue that will bring a 21st century global thought leader to the community.” Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Michael Crowley leaves Time for Politico

Michael Crowley, chief foreign affairs correspondent for Time, is leaving for Politico. The Washington Post’s Erik Wemple tweeted the news on Thursday.

Politico Press also tweeted the news on Thursday.

And from Crowley:

Here are some of Crowley’s pieces for Time. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments