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Posts by Kristen Hare

About Kristen Hare

Kristen Hare covers the media for the Poynter Institute. Her work for Poynter has earned her a Mirror Award nomination. Hare, a graduate of the University of Missouri's School of Journalism, spent 5 years as the Sunday features writer and an assistant editor at the St. Joseph (Missouri) News-Press, and five years as a staff writer covering race, immigration, the census and aging at the St. Louis Beacon. She also spent two years with the Peace Corps in Guyana, South America. Hare and her family live outside Tampa.
NEWS

Local Edition: Here's why journalists stay in the business

This was originally published in our weekly newsletter, Local Edition, which is a product of the Knight-Lenfest Newsroom Initiative. Subscribe here. Have you ever had a party and looked around the room at some point and thought, Wow, there are a lot of cool people here? Well, that’s how my inbox felt this week. Thanks to everyone … Read More
NEWS

After 7 years, a veteran of Chicago journalism is getting back in the game

As a journalism professor, Louise Kiernan often talks with her students about jobs. On Thursday, she talked with her investigative journalism class about her own new job in investigative journalism. Kiernan, an associate professor and head of the social justice and investigative program at Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, was named the first editor in chief of ProPublica … Read More
NEWS

With help from Google and YouTube, McClatchy is trying to figure out the next big thing in video

Two years after creating a video lab in Washington, D.C., McClatchy is heading out West. Today, McClatchy announced Video Lab West, a 10,000-square-foot venture near the company's headquarters in Sacramento, California. At the heart of the project will be experiments in production, collaboration and distribution for types of storytelling that haven't quite hit the mainstream. That includes virtual reality, augmented … Read More
NEWS

ProPublica names Louise Kiernan first editor in chief of ProPublica Illinois

ProPublica Illinois announced Louise Kiernan as its first editor in chief on Tuesday. Kiernan, who worked at the Chicago Tribune for 18 years, comes to ProPublica's first regional project from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. There, she was an associate professor. At the Tribune, Kiernan was the lead reporter on a project that won the … Read More
NEWS

Study: Younger readers got more election news from national newspapers than local ones

The push for more digital news looks like it attracted a coveted demographic for three national news organizations: Younger readers. The New York Times and The Washington Post attracted readers between the ages of 18 and 49 at nearly twice the rate of readers between the ages of 50 and 65 during the U.S. presidential campaign, according to … Read More
NEWS

Three young journalists saw national watchdog work getting all the attention, so they started looking for it locally

Each day, early in the morning, during lunch or when they're done covering politics and courts in Naples, Florida, three young journalists turn back to the news. Alexandra Glorioso, 29, Brett Murphy, 25, and Joseph Cranney, 25, all work together at the Naples Daily News. They also curate a weekly newsletter highlighting local watchdog journalism. For up to an hour … Read More
NEWS

In memory

The Cohort is Poynter's bi-monthly newsletter about women kicking ass in digital media. Hi. This is Kristen Hare. I’m a reporter at Poynter, but you may know me from Katie’s clever sign-offs at the bottom of this newsletter. As The Cohort’s editor, I’m usually behind the scenes. This week, I’m stepping in for Katie. On Feb. 4, Katie’s husband, … Read More
NEWS

A Birmingham weekly is turning to crowdfunding for survival and growth

Weld, a weekly newspaper in Birmingham, Alabama, first launched five and a half years ago. It started out of what founders saw as the necessity for more journalism in the community. Since then, the city has seen cuts to The Birmingham News and the end of daily newspaper delivery. Weld, distributed for free, is a for-profit business. "Theoretically," … Read More
NEWS

Facebook is beginning to reach out to local newsrooms

Last week, Facebook visited journalists in Atlanta and Dallas in what looks like the start of a more reciprocal relationship between the social media giant and local newsrooms. Journalists rely on Facebook to help them reach their audiences, but, until now, Facebook's attention has largely been on national news organizations. The visits are part of the Facebook … Read More
NEWS

We're launching a newsletter conversation about the future of local news

In 2013, I started covering the media for Poynter, and, despite being a journalist for a decade already, I did not know how to cover this beat. Before working here, I covered features, race, immigration, the Census and aging. I followed Poynter for writing, reporting and career advice, but not industry news. That's because when I first started my career … Read More
NEWS

The Staten Island Advance has been through some big changes. Now, it’s pushing for them in the community.

The Staten Island Advance didn’t go out and find its latest project. It came to the newsroom. In a bus. Last January, the Staten Island Developmental Disabilities Council brought more than three dozen people to several places, including the New York newspaper, calling for attention to a growing issue in the community: Who will take care of adults with intellectual … Read More
NEWS

This month, a Washington weekly is shutting down. Today, it ran a house ad looking for new jobs for its journalists.

When a newsroom shuts down, there's usually a series of announcements, internal memos and "I'm looking for work" tweets. Most times, it ends there. But in one Washington newspaper this week, there's a full-page advertisement devoted to helping soon-to-be jobless journalists find work again. Here's what it says on page five of today's Issaquah Press: "We're professional journalists. On Feb. Read More
NEWS

Across the country, newsrooms are using crowdsourcing to cover immigration

On Saturday, as ripples of President Trump’s refugee ban began making news, Los Angeles Times Business Editor Kimi Yoshino suggested a different way to cover the story. Yoshino, who is married to an Iraqi refugee and whose family was detained at internment camps in World War II, saw people sharing their own stories on social media. Her idea: Let’s … Read More
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