Posts by Kristen Hare

About Kristen Hare

Kristen Hare covers the media for the Poynter Institute. Her work for Poynter has earned her a Mirror Award nomination. Hare, a graduate of the University of Missouri's School of Journalism, spent 5 years as the Sunday features writer and an assistant editor at the St. Joseph (Missouri) News-Press, and five years as a staff writer covering race, immigration, the census and aging at the St. Louis Beacon. She also spent two years with the Peace Corps in Guyana, South America. Hare and her family live outside Tampa.
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For 2 photographers who covered Katrina, Baton Rouge floods bring back lessons

The first thing that got him was the smell. It was not quite the same as it was after Hurricane Katrina. But it was very close. That smell — a mildewy, wet, soggy mush of a smell — is hard to describe and impossible to forget. "It's always the smell that gets me, more than the sites. It's a smell," … Read More
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How CIR created an investigative series just for Instagram

Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting's Instagram account has doubled its followers in the past year. And beginning today, those followers, old and new, will get a project created just for them. "Bad Plea Deals" is the California-based nonprofit's first project made specifically for Instagram. The investigative series will unfold in 21 chapters posted three … Read More
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How The Associated Press uses robotic cameras to shoot the Olympics

In Rio, 11 robotic cameras and 16 remote cameras are part of a team of 61 photographers creating thousands of images per day. "The need to place cameras on hanging truss over the field of play in venues with no catwalks or roof access led us to working with several companies to find a way hang … Read More
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Sarasota Herald-Tribune publisher on move to unionize: 'I am very disappointed...'

The Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune is the latest news organization to make a move toward unionization. Journalists at the Herald-Tribune filed paperwork at the National Labor Relations Board on Wednesday demonstrating their interest in being represented by The NewsGuild-CWA, according to a press release. That move triggers a vote in the next 20 to 40 days. "The Herald-Tribune newsroom takes pride … Read More
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Broadcasters, what should you do when you get 'videobombed?'

Broadcasters in Rio for the 2016 Olympics have shown viewers wins and losses, scenic beaches and glimpses at struggles that will continue after the games are over. On BBC Four, they've also included a bachelorette party. BBC Four's Dan Walker was reporting from Copacabana Beach a few days ago when some unexpected guests stopped by. He was a good sport … Read More
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For one Milwaukee columnist, unrest hits close to home

James E. Causey came home Saturday afternoon from errands, sat down on his couch and turned the TV on to watch the Olympics. When the news cut in of an officer shooting an armed man to death in Milwaukee, Causey knew right where it happened. Everything was happening less than a mile from where the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel columnist has lived … Read More
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One idea for what to do with all those comments: Embroidery

Hannah Wise recently found a new side project in the comments section. Actually, fellow Dallas Morning News journalists Claire Cardona found the comment. Wise turned it into art. It came after the story of a death that took place on a Sunday. One of the comments included the line "dead has no days off." Wise made a pattern and … Read More
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This is what it's like to cover your first Olympics

Over the weekend, Tamerra Griffin posted a selfie from Rio on Instagram. The BuzzFeed News reporter included this caption: To 14-year-old Tamerra who watched the 2004 Olympics in Athens laying on her belly with her chin propped up in her palms in a constant state of enchantment, saw NBC host Bob Costas and said out loud, 'I want his job': … Read More
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You can still win that Vermont newspaper in an essay contest

The idea of winning a Vermont weekly through an essay contest drew a lot of entries, "good entries," editor and publisher Ross Connelly told readers in Wednesday's Hardwick Gazette. But not quite enough. So Connelly is extending the deadline by 40 days in hopes of reaching the 700 entrants required to begin judging (he declined to say how … Read More
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Fact-checking, digital savvy, business woes and other notes about the state of Brazil's media

Americans are most likely getting their Olympics news from U.S.-based outlets. But what's the media like in Brazil? Do journalists there face the dangers of simply reporting, as they do in Turkey? Are they pioneering micropayments, like journalists in the Netherlands? Are they shifting toward a more open media landscape, like journalists in Cuba? … Read More
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In a vulgar election, news organizations green-light profanity

Several major U.S. news organizations have similar standards governing the use of profanity. In general, swear words can run with approval, in quotes and when absolutely essential to the meaning of the story. As Election Day approaches, Donald Trump's candidacy has prompted editors to OK the use of words normally left out of campaign coverage, including several instances in the … Read More
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On front pages around the world, let the games begin

Newspapers around the world led the opening day of the 2016 Olympics with athletes, venues and sweeping views of Rio. Here's a small collection, via Newseum and Kiosko. Brazil: Canada: Chile: Colombia: Egypt: France: Italy: Slovakia: Spain: Ukraine: United States: Venezuela: … Read More
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How an AP reporter took down flossing

When an orthodontist asked the reporter if he wanted a good story idea, the reporter, of course, said "yes." Jeff Donn, a national writer with The Associated Press and 2012 Pulitzer finalist, was doubtful, at first, about that tip from his son's orthodontist: There's no solid evidence that flossing actually works. "But when I started to look at … Read More
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How a Mississippi investigative reporter helped find a suspected serial killer

Mary Rose found the reporter who'd help her track down a suspected serial killer while she was listening to the radio. Jerry Mitchell, an investigative reporter for The (Jackson, Mississippi) Clarion-Ledger, appeared on "Democracy Now" to talk about a series of cold cases from the Civil Rights era. That's Neshoba County, Rose told herself. It's near … Read More