Posts by Kristen Hare

About Kristen Hare

Kristen Hare covers the media for the Poynter Institute. Her work for Poynter has earned her a Mirror Award nomination. Hare, a graduate of the University of Missouri's School of Journalism, spent 5 years as the Sunday features writer and an assistant editor at the St. Joseph (Missouri) News-Press, and five years as a staff writer covering race, immigration, the census and aging at the St. Louis Beacon. She also spent two years with the Peace Corps in Guyana, South America. Hare and her family live outside Tampa.
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Reporter who rappelled down a 245-foot-high building: 'Yeah, I did look down'

Reporter Craig Hill isn't a huge fan of heights. Keep that in mind while watching him rappel down a 245-foot-high hotel in downtown Tacoma, Washington: .mcclatchy-embed{position:relative;padding:40px 0 56.25%;height:0;overflow:hidden;max-width:100%}.mcclatchy-embed iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%}   Despite his feelings about heights, Hill, who covers the outdoors for The (Olympia, Washington) Olympian and The (Tacoma, Washington) News Tribune, is lucky to have a job where he gets … Read More
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Pew: Conservatives and liberals disagree about the media's best (and worst) traits

From January to February of this year, Pew asked 4,654 Americans about their views of the news. Specifically, researchers wanted to hear about the positive and negative traits they see the media. The results? That depends on the political leanings of the respondents. A third of conservatives Republicans ranked biased reporting as the worst offense, according to a … Read More
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A year after Roseburg, journalists share lessons from covering a mass shooting

Last October, Nicole Dahmen and Lori Shontz watched as their current and former students mobilized to cover a school shooting less than 80 miles away. While Roseburg, Oregon flooded with local and national journalists, they asked themselves a question: What was their responsibility, as journalism educators, to look at how journalists cover gun violence and inform their communities? What responsibilities … Read More
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What The Dallas Morning News learned by testing its new site in public

In July, as The Dallas Morning News covered a protest that turned into a deadly shooting, their website went down. Luckily, they had a backup. The downside? It wasn't quite ready yet. The new site was still being tested. But when their server failed, they pushed the bare-bones, dress rehearsal version out to readers. More than two months later, … Read More
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On front pages the morning after: 'The great debate?'

Headline writers at newspapers across the country looked to sports and war metaphors to describe Monday night's presidential debate between Republican candidate Donald Trump and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. The two candidates sparred, they swung, they sparked, they battled, they clashed, they fired shots, the gloves came off, no punches were pulled, and on and on. Many fronts also offered … Read More
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How millennial journalists are unraveling local news for their peers

SARASOTA, Florida — One Wednesday morning, Rachel O'Hara, a multimedia journalist at the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, messaged her colleagues: "Does anyone actually use bar soap?" Arts reporter Dahlia Ghabour responded first: "I do." Alan Shaw, analytics/engagement lead producer, followed: "Me, too." O'Hara heard that millennials are killing the bar soap industry, she told them. "Filthy millennials," Shaw said. "Basically," O'Hara … Read More
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Honolulu Civil Beat now has a 72-year-old intern

Journalists at Honolulu's Civil Beat have probably gotten used to the platinum-haired man who comes in twice a week, parks himself and his laptop in an open common area of the newsroom, speaks up with questions and offers context now and then. That's Ron Hochuli. He's the intern. He's also 72. Both he and the newsroom are figuring out how … Read More
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WSJ bosses on working together and when to bring in food (always)

One weekend during this crazy news year, the social team at The Wall Street Journal was able to keep up with big news happening from Turkey to Louisiana from their homes thanks to Slack. "Even though a lot of our social team was working from home because it was the weekend and we didn’t expect them to be on duty, … Read More
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The New Yorker's Sarah Stillman is among this year's MacArthur Fellows

More than 30 journalists and non-fiction writers have been chosen as MacArthur Fellows since 1981. Sarah Stillman, a staff writer at The New Yorker, is the latest to join that list. Stillman's fellowship comes with "a no-strings-attached $625,000 grant for their exceptional creativity and potential for future contributions to their fields," according to the press release. Stillman, a longform investigative … Read More
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Short on enough essays to win a newspaper, the Hardwick Gazette turns to crowdfunding

So far, no one has wanted to buy a weekly newspaper in Vermont outright, and not enough people have submitted essays for the contest seeking a new owner. So Hardwick Gazette editor and publisher Ross Connelly is making one final push, this time with crowdfunding. According to a press release sent out today, Connelly is extending … Read More
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ESPN's Rob King on being a leader (and dealing with your email)

Rob King was in his 20s the first time someone told him he had talents beyond being an editorial cartoonist. He was management material. King, now ESPN's senior vice president of SportsCenter and news, clearly got the message eventually. But not at first. King is part of this week's 40 Better Hours project, devoted to explaining how journalists … Read More
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Email's the worst. How do you wade through your inbox?

The messages pile up fast. There are pitches from P.R. people, Google invites to meetings, special one-day-only sales at Macy's. Too often there's the boggy reply-all. Email often feels like a wild place that we're just doing our best to tame a bit each day. Today, Katie Hawkins-Gaar took on the endless emails and meetings in day two … Read More
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Nearing burnout? Here are 4 tips from WNYC's Manoush Zomorodi on staying sane

Part of being a journalist is being on call, always aware of what's happening. "I think if that is your job, it is more important than ever to be incredibly strict with yourself when you are off that you recharge," said WNYC's Manoush Zomorodi. Zomorodi is the host of WNYC's podcast, "Note to Self." In it, she takes … Read More
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ONA's Irving Washington on inclusion, innovation and stumbling into the right gig

The Online News Association began the week of its annual conference with some personal news: Deputy Director Irving Washington will be the group's next executive director. Washington, who's currently in Denver with a lot of other journalists this week for ONA16, took a few minutes to talk with Poynter via email about what's changed … Read More
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How the L.A. Times used a serial narrative and smart design to bring in new subscribers

When the Los Angeles Times launched a six-part narrative earlier this month, they tried something a lot of news organizations aren't doing anymore: Instead of running the entire story all at once, they published just the first chapter. It was a gamble. The story told in "Framed" first unfolded in California a few years earlier when a powerful … Read More