Kristen Hare


Here’s how to use Snapchat (and how not to use Snapchat)

One packed session from ONA14 was Mobile Bootcamp: Snapchat. Masuma Ahuja, digital editor of The Washington Post, led the session on the social tool that doesn’t drive traffic to stories. Instead, it helps reporters and news organizations build and be part of communities.

Before we get any further, a quick primer on Snapchat: Here are the basics on getting started (and what all those icons mean.)

Now, let’s start with how not to use Snapchat:

– Don’t think it’s like anything else.

“It’s not Twitter, it’s not Instagram,” Ahuja said.

Instead, people have to accept an invitation from you, and you then become part of their selected group.

“I think of it as building a community there,” Ahuja said. “They treat us as their weird friend who talks about politics.”

On Instagram, she said, you can see you’re one of 20,000.… Read more

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Why is Ebola capitalized? And how do you say it?

FILE – This undated file image made available by the CDC shows the Ebola Virus. As a deadly Ebola outbreak continues in West Africa, health officials are working to calm fears that the virus easily spreads, while encouraging those with symptoms to get medical care. (AP Photo/CDC, File)

After all, flu isn’t capitalized, and neither are chickenpox or measles.

Here’s why:

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

According to the World Health Organization, Ebola “first appeared in 1976 in 2 simultaneous outbreaks, one in Nzara, Sudan, and the other in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter occurred in a village near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.”

And how do you pronounce it?… Read more

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Who’s doing diversity well? BuzzFeed

On Wednesday, BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith publicly shared an email he sent to staff about diversity at BuzzFeed. It’s titled “What We’re Doing To Keep Building A Diverse Editorial Operation,” and it includes a definition of diversity, four reasons that it matters and five things editors should do when hiring.

BuzzFeed’s working definition of diversity is this: enough people of a particular group that no one person has to represent the supposed viewpoint of their group — whether ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, gender identity, socioeconomic background, or disability. And if the group is a small one we should never expect one person to be the “diverse” reporter or writer, or to speak for anyone other than themselves.

BuzzFeed has a fairly even mix between women and men, according to the letter, and it’s still pretty white.… Read more

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Three fronts from Hong Kong that zoom in instead of out

Like I do most mornings, I combed through front pages from Newseum and Kisoko.net early on Wednesday. I expected to see large images with huge crowds on the fronts of many papers, and I did. But I also saw a few images that stood out from the Hong Kong protests because of the way they zoomed in, both conceptually and literally.

The first comes from Die Tageszeitung in Berlin, Germany:

The Sydney Morning Herald in Sydney, Australia, zoomed in, too, for a sight that feels both familiar and different from Ferguson. The two protests are not the same, of course, but there is something about seeing a person standing in defiance surrounded by tear gas that made me think of this iconic Ferguson image from Robert Cohen of The St.… Read more

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Front pages from Hong Kong’s ‘Umbrella Revolution’

Protests continue in Hong Kong, and newspapers in the region and around the world led with images of thousands in the streets on Tuesday. Here are a few of them, via Newseum and Kisoko.net. (I’ve also started a Twitter list of journalists covering the protests in Hong Kong. Email me or tweet me and let me know who I’m missing.)… Read more

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In honor of National Coffee Day, here are some mug shots

It’s National Coffee Day for a bit longer, and earlier on Monday I asked readers to share photos of their favorite coffee mugs on Twitter. Here’s what they sent:

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Who’s covering protests in Hong Kong?

If you want to follow news of the protests in Hong Kong, I’ve made a Twitter list (currently 107 and growing) of journalists covering the story from Hong Kong.

Who am I missing? Email me at khare@poynter.org, or tweet at me @kristenhare, and I’ll add them to the list. There are a lot of hashtags, at this point, to search as well. They include: #hk, #HongKong, #OccupyCentral #OccupyHK, #UmbrellaMovement and #UmbrellaRevolution.

A few other great lists to check out, which helped me build this one, come from Andrew Peng and Joe Weisenthal. Peng, an editor and journalist with Reason Squared (and the owner of a pretty great Twitter handle) created this list: Hong Kong Protests, which gathers journalists and protesters.… Read more

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‘You have to look up, but you also have to look down’: Advice from women in leadership

Lady Leader Lightning Talks brought together a group of women (on a very small stage) at the Online News Association Conference in Chicago on Thursday. The women started by offering bits of advice to the men and women in the room. Here’s what they said.

Anna Holmes, editor of digital voices and storytelling, Fusion:

“The best piece of advice I ever got I actually gave to myself,” Holmes said. She doesn’t have voices in her head, “but I actually had a voice that said, ‘it’s OK to say no.’”

Liz Heron, news partnerships, Facebook:

“If something scares you, it’s probably worth doing.”

Also: “Always negotiate.”

Ann Marie Lipinski, Nieman Foundation for Journalism:

“What time and my daughter have taught me is how intensely and deeply gratifying the work can be, all the work.”

Say yes, she said, to leadership and new challenges.… Read more

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A new teddy bear memorial is cordoned off, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo., near the spot of where Michael Brown was shot by Ferguson police office Darren Wilson on Aug. 9. The original teddy bear memorial was destroyed by fire earlier Tuesday morning. Ferguson police spokesman Devin James says the cause of the fire is under investigation. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Five things about covering Ferguson

A new teddy bear memorial is cordoned off, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo., near the spot of where Michael Brown was shot by Ferguson police office Darren Wilson on Aug. 9. The original teddy bear memorial was destroyed by fire earlier Tuesday morning. Ferguson police spokesman Devin James says the cause of the fire is under investigation. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

David Carson didn’t expect the story in Ferguson to last. Carson, a photojournalist with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, thought news of the death of a local teenager would end the day it started.

It didn’t, of course, and a month and a half after Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown, the story continues. On Thursday morning, while people gathered to listen to a panel of journalists talk about Ferguson at the Online News Association Conference in Chicago, news spread that Ferguson’s police chief had issued an apology to Brown’s family.… Read more

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St. Louis County cops sorry for sounding racist — they meant the media are animals

Associated Press | Gawker

On Monday afternoon, the Associated Press reported that a spokesman with the St. Louis County police department has apologized for a flier about how police can deal better with the media.

They’re not meant to be racist, said Rick Rosenthal, the seminar’s leader.

Rosenthal, a police media consultant, says the “gorilla” and “animals” references are aimed at the media. His 1999 book, “Feeding the Animals,” deals with how police departments give information to reporters.

So now that’s clear. Gawker’s Zara Golden wrote about the flier on Monday.

Topics covered may include: “Feeding the Animals” (“animals” being some sort of endearment for protesters or reporters?), “‘No Comment’ is a comment,” “Managing Media Assault and Batter,” and “Managing the media when things get ugly (think Ferguson).” Sure, think Ferguson; because the issue there was definitely one of media handling, not gun handling….

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