ADVERTISEMENT

Posts by Melody Kramer

About Melody Kramer

Melody Kramer spent the majority of her career in public media, where she directed, produced, edited, and wrote stuff for several shows, including Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me and Fresh Air with Terry Gross. More recently, she worked as a digital strategist at NPR, where she launched and then directed projects that helped NPR make better decisions and build audiences online and on-air. She was a 2014-2015 Visiting Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and just received a Knight Prototype Grant to build out Media Public. Mel has a newsletter where she shares stuff she's learned. She lives in Carrboro, NC.
NEWS

How Iowa media covers the Iowa caucuses

Every four years, the national media’s attention turns to Iowa. In the past few months, The New York Times has published over 150 articles on the upcoming Iowa caucuses, which take place next Monday. ABC, CBS, CNN, Fox News and NBC all have national reporters embedded in the state who attend … Read More
NEWS

A new podcast from Wyoming is turning hosting on its head

Public radio producers spend a lot of time prepping their hosts. This can include anything from taking notes on a book to writing introductions for segments to writing out interview questions for the host to use during a pre-taped or live interview. This isn’t surprising, given the number of interviews and segments that … Read More
NEWS

You can steal Sara Simon’s sewage bot...and everything else she makes

There were a lot of sewage spills last summer in Vermont. Unfortunately, the state website that reported those spills was somewhat hard to navigate — people who wanted to know if their water was safe to drink had to manually refresh a website and then check to see if their … Read More
NEWS

Making a Bingo card for news

I was at the public library last week picking up some books when I saw a giant display in the window. It was called Library Bingo and it had categories for books people might pick up at their local library: non-fiction, mystery, travel, etc. It also had suggested activities for people: rate your favorite book in the catalog, find new … Read More
NEWS

24 Pull Requests: The journalism edition

Over 10,000 people around the world are currently taking part in an annual event called 24 Pull Requests. 24 Pull Requests, which is held each December, asks developers, designers, content creators, and others to give thanks for open source softwareby “giving back little gifts of code for Christmas.” The idea is simple: over the first 24 days of December, … Read More
NEWS

Personalized text messages: The new push notification

BuzzFeed's news app has several options for push notifications. I have a confession to make: I recently turned off all push notifications on my phone. My reason for doing so was simple: When breaking news happened, my phone buzzed like a gnat. Not just one time — but several times because I have several news apps installed on my … Read More
NEWS

Designing journalism products for accessibility

A few months ago, I went over my friend Betty’s apartment to drop off some spaghetti and meatballs. Betty is 89 and a news junkie. After we sat down and drank some tea, she asked me to help her find some news stories she wanted to read on her iPad. “Sure,” I said, as we peered at her screen. “Why … Read More
NEWS

2015 was not the year of HTTPS for news organizations

(Photo by Sean MacEntee/Flickr) Two weeks ago, I went to a news industry conference and sat in on a session about HTTPS, a protocol for securely communicating over computer networks. The session was sparsely attended compared to the other sessions at the conference, which surprised me. I started to think about why so many people may have skipped it: … Read More
NEWS

How people who don’t work in news consume their news

How do you get your news? (Photo by CANNIK/Flickr) The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated that there were 42,280 reporters and correspondents working in the United States in 2014. That number includes people who report for newspapers, news magazines, radio, and television, but excludes broadcast news analysts. (They have their own category.) Every so often, I like … Read More
NEWS

Where podcast discovery could go next

I recently moved from Washington, D.C. to a small farming community outside of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Over the past three months, I’ve realized that I’ve started to consume news differently. There are fewer news outlets to choose from here, and I find myself relying on a college newspaper, The Daily Tar Heel, for my hyperlocal news. The DTH, … Read More
NEWS

How were you introduced to the concept of news?

(Photo by Deposit Photos) A while ago, I asked the Internet a question: “What’s the earliest news event that you remember?” Dozens of people responded and the results indicated that most people’s earliest news memory happened around the age of 5 or 6 when a teacher or parent told them to watch or read the news because a … Read More
NEWS

4 ideas journalism can borrow from libraries

Little Free Library (Photo by Ali Eminov/Flickr) I’ve always been a big fan of libraries. I received my first library card on my 4th birthday, which my parents tricked me into thinking was the best birthday gift in the world. It wasn’t exactly a gift - you simply had to be 4 in order to get a library … Read More
NEWS

Millennials in public media want to be heard

The public media world headed to Pittsburgh recently for its annual look at programming. Among the more interesting things to come out of the PRPD conference was this: public media is having a tough time attracting younger listeners during drive-time. Tim Eby, the general manager of St. Louis Public Radio, noted in a Medium post that the number … Read More
NEWS

That public radio documentary you just listened to was made by high school students

Isandro Malik and Omeed Miraftab-Salo during an interview at WILL. (Photo via Uni/WILL) Every year, the eighth graders entering Janet Morford’s social studies class at the University of Illinois Laboratory High School (Uni) learn how to conduct oral history interviews. This is a common project at many high schools. I remember learning how to do something similar. Many of … Read More
NEWS

How the Philadelphia media gets around during Pope's visit

While many people in the cities affected by the Pope's movements will be taking off, 8,000 journalists accredited to cover the Pope's visit to the United States this week will not. That number includes many journalists based in Philadelphia, the last of the three cities on the Pope's visit to the United States. The city will host the Pope … Read More
ADVERTISEMENT