The Poynter Institute


poynterlogogreenbox

Poynter announces project to train Turkish journalists

From the left, Deniz Ergürel, secretary general of the Media Association of Turkey, Howard Finberg, Poynter’s director of business development, Salih Memecan, chairman of the Media Association, Vicki Krueger, Poynter’s director of interactive learning, and Craig Dicker, cultural affairs officer, U.S. Consulate in Istanbul, announce Poynter’s new program for Turkish journalists at a press conference on Wednesday.

One of Poynter’s most ambitious international projects has launched in Turkey today, with four e-learning modules from Poynter NewsU transformed for Turkish journalists. The project also includes the opportunity for 20 Turkish journalists to attend a workshop at Poynter in late October.

The project was developed in partnership with the Media Association of Turkey, a nonprofit journalism organization with a mission to improve Turkish journalism. The initial funding came from a U.S. State Department grant through its “innovation fund.”

Four e-learning courses, from the more than 400 modules on Poynter NewsU, were localized with examples relevant to journalists in Turkey before they were translated in Turkish. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
patterson-poynter

50 years ago today, Gene Patterson published influential ‘Flower for the Graves’ column

Fifty years ago today, Gene Patterson, editor of The Atlanta Journal Constitution, published his most famous editorial column, “A Flower for the Graves.” The sad occasion was one of America’s most vicious hate crimes, the dynamite bombing of a Baptist church in Birmingham, Ala. The blast killed four young girls.

Patterson’s rage at his fellow white Southerners comes out in every word. The column was deemed so powerful in its time that Walter Cronkite asked Patterson to read it for the CBS Evening News. While some of its language may feel outdated, its clarion call for racial justice rings as loud and clear as ever.

Patterson, who died earlier this year, holds a special place in the history of the Poynter Institute. Nelson Poynter appointed Patterson to succeed him as the leader of the St. Petersburg Times and to create the school that would own the newspaper. The library at Poynter is named after Patterson. Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
SCALES

Poynter faculty respond to questions about Romenesko’s practices, resignation

Given that Poynter is a school, with a faculty, it’s probably no surprise to anyone that we don’t agree on the severity of Jim Romenesko’s attribution transgressions. And nobody’s telling us to keep quiet either. To that end, we bring you a diversity of thoughts from the Poynter teaching faculty:

Karen Dunlap, President

Roy Peter Clark, Vice President and Senior Scholar

Kelly McBride, Senior Faculty for Ethics

Al Tompkins, Senior Faculty for Broadcast

Butch Ward, Managing Director

Rick Edmonds, Media Business Analyst

Jill Geisler, Senior Faculty, Leadership and Management

Bill Mitchell, Leader of Entrepreneurial and International Programs

Karen Dunlap, President

We wrote a centerpiece yesterday to show that we make mistakes, too.

The piece began:

Poynter.org works hard to meet the highest standards of journalism excellence, and I [Julie Moos, director of Poynter Online] learned late Wednesday that we have not consistently met those standards.

Our site parades goof-ups and misdeeds by others regularly, and Poynter faculty speak out on ethical lapses and questionable practices by others, so when we noted our faults we opted for transparency. Read more

Tools:
116 Comments