David Shedden

avatar

David Shedden is a researcher and the library director at the Poynter Institute. Poynter Online daily feature: "Today in Media History"


Screen Shot 2015-04-24 at 8.11.59 AM

Today in Media History: The U.S. aborted a rescue mission to free the hostages in Iran

Thirty-five years ago, the U.S. aborted a Delta Force operation to rescue the U.S. hostages in Iran.

Here’s a story excerpt from The Washington Post:

“The United States tried and failed to rescue the American hostages in Iran with a commando-style raid in which eight U.S. crewmen were killed, the White House announced today.

The military operation, according to a post-midnight statement from the White House, was ‘aborted’ because of an equipment failure, followed by a collision of two aircraft, at a remote desert location, in which the eight were killed and others injured.

The American troops, including the injured, were then airlifted safely from the unknown staging site in Iran, according to the statement issued by White House press secretary Jody Powell….”

A page one headline from the suburban Chicago newspaper, The Daily Herald:

Image-1980 Carter Iran

Image-Break 760

The Daily Pennsylvanian published an AP story titled, “Hostage Rescue Aborted, Ends In Plane Crash”:

“The White House announced early this morning that a daring military effort to rescue American hostages held in Tehran was aborted because of ‘equipment failure.’ A collision of two U.S.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
P-WF

Today in Media History: The future was introduced at the 1964 World’s Fair

On April 23, 1964, the media described the opening of the World’s Fair in New York City’s Flushing Meadows Park. The fair, which had opened the day before, even received a detailed review from Edwin Newman and NBC News.

The 1964 World’s Fair was not a financial success, but as this AP/CBS story reminds us, it offered a fascinating look at the future:

“Video phone calls? Yeah, we do that. Asking computers for information? Sure, several times a day. Colonies on the moon and jet packs as a mode of everyday transportation. OK, maybe not.

The New York World’s Fair of 1964 introduced 51 million visitors to a range of technological innovations and predictions, some that turned out to be right on the money and others that, perhaps thankfully, were way off the mark.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2015-04-22 at 2.55.30 PM

Today in Media History: The seizure of 6-year-old Elian Gonzalez

Fifteen years ago today the news media reported on the seizure of 6-year-old Elian Gonzalez by armed U.S. federal agents. The story had begun a few months earlier:

“On Thanksgiving Day 1999, 5-year old Cuban boy Elian Gonzalez is discovered floating in an inner tube by fishermen off the coast of Florida. Two days prior, a small boat carrying his mother, Elizabeth Brotons, and at least 10 others, capsized in the waters between Cuba and the United States.

A day following his Nov. 25 rescue, Elian is transferred from a hospital into the care of his great uncle Lazaro Gonzalez and his cousin Maryslesis. On Nov. 27, Elian’s biological father begins to demand the return of his son to Cuba, though Gonzalez makes the case that the boy would be better served in America.”

— “Brief History of the Elian Gonzalez Saga
Time Magazine

A page one headline from the Farmingham Daily Times:

Image-Elian-Farmingham

Image-Break 760

This excerpt from the Miami Herald story, “Raid returns Elian to father,” is part of a collection of the newspaper’s Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting about Elian Gonzalez:

“It took five months for the custody battle over Elian Gonzalez to build to a tense standoff.

Read more
Tools:
1 Comment
Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 8.27.50 AM

Today in Media History: World War I news stories described the end of the Red Baron

It didn’t take long for newspapers to print the news that German World War I fighter pilot Manfred von Richthofen (aka the Red Baron) was shot down and killed in France on April 21, 1918.

The April 22, 1918 edition of The (New York) Evening World published a short article and front page image of Richthofen. More information came the following day:

“LONDON, April 23 — Further details were received today of the death of Baron Rittmeister von Richthofen, leader of the German ‘Flying Circus,’ just credited by Berlin with eighty victories.

….This swarm of raiders appeared suddenly on Sunday over the British lines near the Somme Valley, and after an attack on some British planes, a general fight started, in which fifty or more airplanes were engaged.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 9.00.50 AM

Today in Media History: Reporters covered the first official Boston Red Sox game at Fenway Park

April 20, 1912 was a big day for sports news when the Boston Red Sox officially opened Fenway Park. They beat the New York Highlanders, who would later be named the New York Yankees, 7-6.

Here is a story excerpt and headline from the April 21, 1912 edition of the Boston Sunday Post:

“Into the mammoth stand, out upon the sun-kissed bleachers and swarming over the field, forming a human fringe to the expansive playing space where the Red Sox were to make their initial bow of the 1912 season, the fans of Boston forced their way, until when the umpire gave the word for play to begin more than 24,000 loyal Red Sox supporters were waiting to pass judgement upon park and team.”

Image-BSP

Image-Break 760

Exactly 100 years later the Boston Globe published an article called, “Fenway Park shines in 100th anniversary.” This is how the story ends:

“…A century ago, Mayor John ‘Honey Fitz’ Fitzgerald threw out the game’s first official pitch.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
P-1988 Pulitzers

Today in Media History: 2006 Pulitzers honored Hurricane Katrina coverage

On April 17, 2006, the Sun Herald and the Times-Picayune were awarded Pulitzer Prizes for their coverage of Hurricane Katrina.

Their award-winning work, along with other great journalism honored that year, is posted on the Pulitzer website and linked to below.

Public Service
The Times-Picayune, New Orleans
and
Sun Herald, Biloxi-Gulfport

Breaking News Reporting
Staff of The Times-Picayune, New Orleans

Investigative Reporting
Susan Schmidt, James V. Grimaldi and R. Jeffrey Smith of The Washington Post

Explanatory Reporting
David Finkel of The Washington Post

Beat Reporting
Dana Priest of The Washington Post

National Reporting
James Risen and Eric Lichtblau of The New York Times
and
The San Diego Union-Tribune and Copley News Service with notable work by Marcus Stern and Jerry Kammer

International Reporting
Joseph Kahn and Jim Yardley of The New York Times

Feature Writing
Jim Sheeler of Rocky Mountain News, Denver

Commentary
Nicholas D. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
P-1988 Pulitzers

Today in Media History: And the winners of the 2001 Pulitzers in journalism are…

The 2001 Pulitzer Prizes for journalism were awarded on this date 14 years ago today.

The award-winning work is posted on the Pulitzer website and linked to below. Take a look at the remarkable journalism honored that year:

Public Service
The Oregonian, Portland

“Awarded to The Oregonian, Portland, for its detailed and unflinching examination of systematic problems within the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, including harsh treatment of foreign nationals and other widespread abuses, which prompted various reforms.”

Breaking News Reporting
Staff of The Miami Herald

“Awarded to the Miami Herald Staff for its balanced and gripping on-the-scene coverage of the pre-dawn raid by federal agents that took the Cuban boy Elian Gonzalez from his Miami relatives and reunited him with his Cuban father.”

Investigative Reporting
David Willman of Los Angeles Times

“Awarded to David Willman of Los Angeles Times for his pioneering exposé of seven unsafe prescription drugs that had been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and an analysis of the policy reforms that had reduced the agency’s effectiveness.”

Explanatory Reporting
Staff of Chicago Tribune

“Awarded to the Chicago Tribune Staff for ‘Gateway to Gridlock,’ its clear and compelling profile of the chaotic American air traffic system.”

Beat Reporting
David Cay Johnston of The New York Times

“Awarded to David Cay Johnston of The New York Times for his penetrating and enterprising reporting that exposed loopholes and inequities in the U.S. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
P-Titanic

Today in Media History: Wireless telegraph reported the sinking of the Titanic

On April 15, 1912, the news media reported that the British steamship Titanic sank after striking an iceberg in the North Atlantic.

Information about the disaster came fast, but it was often inaccurate, leading to numerous incorrect headlines and stories.

Two days after the sinking, The Detroit News published a story titled, “1,241 missing, 868 saved from Titanic; hope of more rescues abandoned.” Here is an excerpt:

“White Star liner Titanic, biggest and most luxurious ship ever built, on her maiden voyage, struck an iceberg 1,030 miles east of New York, at 10:30 Sunday night, and sank in four hours. 1,241 of those on board, probably including practically all of crew, went down with vessel. Prominent men among the missing include John Jacob Astor, Benjamin Guggenheim, George D.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
P-Lincoln

Today in Media History: 150 years ago news bulletins reported that President Lincoln had been shot

Late in the evening of April 14, 1865, actor John Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, DC.

Telegraph bulletins soon reported the news.

Lawrence Gobright was in his Associated Press office when someone ran in with the news about President Lincoln. Gobright sent out the first brief telegraph bulletin about the assassination: “The President was shot in a theatre tonight and perhaps mortally wounded.”

Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and his staff updated newspapers and wire services about the president’s condition. Here is a report from The New York Times:

Awful Event
———-
President Lincoln Shot by an Assassin
———-
The Deed Done at Ford’s Theatre Last Night
———-
THE ACT OF A DESPERATE REBEL
———-
The President Still Alive at Last Accounts.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2015-04-13 at 8.30.13 AM

Today in Media History: Apollo 13 explosion placed crew in danger

On April 13, 1970, Apollo 13′s oxygen tank exploded damaging the spacecraft.

Media coverage changed from a story about a mission to the moon, to a mission to save the crew of Apollo 13.

Page one from the Logansport (Indiana) Press:

Image-LP

Image-Break 760

“At the time of the oxygen-tank explosion two days into the mission, Lovell, Haise and fellow astronaut Jack Swigert were not initially aware of the seriousness of their situation.

‘Well, when the explosion occurred and we sort of found out and assessed on our own that we weren’t going to land on the moon, the first thoughts were one of disappointment,’ said Lovell. ‘We didn’t realize the significance or the danger.’

But soon Lovell realized that so much of the spacecraft was virtually useless and he spoke to mission control at the Johnson Space Center in Texas those now-famous words: ‘Houston, we’ve had a problem.’

‘The two fuel cells, or the three fuel cells, failed,’ Lovell said.

Read more
Tools:
1 Comment
Page 1 of 4512345678910...Last »