Archived content from Poynter.org

Why we published Twitter handle of alleged rape victim

As Mallary Tenore and Kelly McBride started reporting a story about the alleged rape of a young Tampa woman, we knew that we would ourselves confront the dilemma about which we were writing: whether to name the person who revealed her attack on Twitter.

The three of us discussed the options for naming her. We talked specifically about the reasons journalists generally do not name people who come forward in situations like this, at the risk of being victimized a second time by the law, the media and the public discourse about sex crimes.

At the time we talked, I struggled with whether the underlying principle held in this case: We protect potential sexual assault victims because they do not want their situations made public. But this young woman made hers public on a Twitter account that displays her first name with a handle that includes her last name.

Though she may have intended the tweets for the circle of her then-600+ followers, once it was published it could (and was) followed by many others for whom it was not directly intended, including the media. In other words, it was public.

So, what protection can and should journalists afford someone who has chosen to reveal information? And what if you’re told by counselors — as we were — that people who reveal this information often later regret having done so?

After communicating with her several times in the 10 days since the alleged attack, we asked the woman if she would grant us permission to use her name. She suggested we use her Twitter handle, which we did. I considered spelling out her Twitter handle, but it seems that additional step — combined with a link to her Twitter feed — all but guaranteed her name would be made public.

And once you know her name, a Google search immediately presents you with social networking profiles that reveal where she works, her parents’ names, and a geo-location service that includes some places she has frequented. It scared me to think a potential criminal would have access to this information. And so, we stuck with her Twitter handle.

I am certain this is not the wrong decision, but I am uncertain whether it is the right one.

Share your thoughts by commenting on this story or emailing me privately at jmoos at poynter.org Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010

How to subscribe to e-mail newsletters

Poynter’s email newsletters went on hiatus recently as we work to improve our offering. We recently surveyed our readers and with their input will be launching a new newsletter soon.

Thanks,

Seth Liss
Editor, Poynter Online

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Monday, Nov. 29, 2010

FAQs about Poynter.org

We’ve listed some common questions about our website with answers below. If your question isn’t answered here, please e-mail us and we’ll respond as quickly as we can.

How do I login?
Either your NewsU or Poynter.org login should work on Poynter.org now. If you’ve forgotten your username or password, send us an e-mail and we’ll reset your password.

Do I have to register to comment?
You no longer have to register with Poynter.org to comment on one of our stories. You can log in to comment using Facebook Connect or a Disqus ID. We do suggest you use a real name and we require that you follow our feedback guidelines. If you do not, we may delete your comment and/or suspend your commenting privileges.

Is there any need to register with the site?
To apply for a seminar, purchase a product or subscribe to a newsletter, you will need to register. However, if you just want to comment, you can log in using Facebook Connect or Disqus.

What about my newsletters? Will I still get them?
If you subscribe to any of our active newsletters, you will still receive them. If you are not receiving newsletters and would like to, instructions for subscribing are here.

What happened to my personal page?

We can provide you with the data stored on your Poynter.org personal page, but the pages are no longer being created or published.

Where can I find…?

If you’re looking for… You’ll find it in…
Romenesko Latest News
Mobile Media Latest News/Media Lab
Ask the Recruiter How To’s/Career Development
Writing Tools How To’s/Newsgathering & Storytelling
SuperVision/What Great Bosses Know How To’s/Leadership & Management

How can I reach Poynter?

Our street address is:
The Poynter Institute
801 Third St. South
St. Petersburg, Florida 33701

Our main phone number is: 727-821-9494

You can find contact information for individual faculty & staff here. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Sunday, Nov. 28, 2010

Contact us

Thank you for contacting Poynter. We hope this information enables you to reach the appropriate source of information at Poynter. If you have a question that’s not answered below, please check our Frequently Asked Questions page to see if the answer is there. If it’s not, please e-mail webstaff, and we’ll respond as soon as possible.

MOST POPULAR REQUESTS:

FACULTY:

  • Click here for a directory of Poynter faculty and staff, including biographical and contact information.

POYNTER TRAINING

PRINTED PUBLICATIONS AND MAIL

LOCATION & PHONE NUMBERS

Our street address is:

The Poynter Institute
801 Third St. South
St. Petersburg, Florida 33701
Map & Directions

Our main phone number is: 727-821-9494

You can find contact information for individual faculty & staff here. Read more

Tools:
4 Comments

Sunday, Nov. 21, 2010

20101029_182654_19416

Learn more about the new Poynter.org and tell us what you think

For the last several months, we’ve invited you to share your input on the new Poynter.org. We listened, and are just about ready to launch our new website.

This site is built around two areas of focus: latest news and how to’s.

For more than a decade you have counted on Jim Romenesko to tell you what’s happening in newsrooms. He continues to do that. You also want news about emerging organizations and platforms that affect journalism’s future — our new Mobile Media and Social Media blogs do that, along with partner feeds from some of the best websites covering news. And you can always count on us to cover the business and help you make sense of news and how it spreads.

Poynter has been a source of training for 35 years, and now it will be easier to access quick tips in enduring and emerging areas: reporting, writing, engaging communities, developing business ideas, leading teams, and developing digital strategies.

We’ve also created a more robust and seamless experience between Poynter’s digital offerings — our e-learning website, News University, and information about us: our training, events and other activities.

Please browse around this preview and tell us what you think or click here to take a survey.

You can also ask questions about the new site during a live chat on Monday starting at 2:30 p.m. ET.

Ask questions about the new Poynter.org Read more

Tools:
4 Comments

Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2010

‘Poynter Pitch’ Official Rules

OFFICIAL RULES
Pitch to Poynter Contest

These rules are for the “Pitch to Poynter” Contest (“the Contest”), with entry into the Contest beginning Friday, October 1, 2010 at 11:05 a.m. Eastern Time and ending Wednesday, October 13, 2010 at 12:01 a.m. Eastern Time. Entry into the Contest constitutes the entrant’s full and unconditional agreement to and acceptance of these rules, terms and conditions.

ELIGIBILITY

NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. Purchase will not improve chances of winning. The Contest is open to legal residents of the United States who are 18 years of age or older at the time of entry, except that employees of The Poynter Institute, Times Publishing Company, their affiliates and subsidiaries, advertising and promotion agencies, contest prize suppliers, and participating advertisers and their immediate family members are not eligible to enter or win. “Immediate family members” means parents, siblings, spouses, children, grandparents and grandchildren, whether by current or past marriage, remarriage, adoption or cohabitation, and anyone living in the same household, whether related or not. The Poynter Institute’s determination as to eligibility is final and binding.

HOW TO ENTER

All entries must be received on or before 12:01 a.m. Eastern Time on Wednesday, October 13. Only one entry per person is permitted. To enter the contest, upload a YouTube video tagged “poynterpitch” by 12:01 a.m. Eastern Time on Wednesday, October 13 that describes the news product or service you’re building. Keep the video to under three minutes. Tell us the basics of your business idea: 1) The problem/opportunity you seek to address 2) Your solution, or your idea 3) Who else is doing this 4) Your planned revenue streams, and 5) The skills and credentials of you and your team. E-mail your video to pitch@poynter.org with a link to the video.

The odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received.

In order to be considered, entries must be received by the time and date stated above. The Poynter Institute (“Sponsor”) is not responsible for late, lost, incomplete, misdirected, damaged, garbled, jumbled, illegible or ineligible entries or for any computer, online, telephone, cable, network, electronic or Internet hardware or software malfunctions or failures, or any human or technical errors that may occur. Sponsor is not responsible for any other problems or errors in modes of transmission of entries. The use of any scheme, program or device to automate entry is prohibited. Any attempt by any entrant to tamper with or undermine the legitimate operation of the Contest will, in the Sponsor’s sole discretion, result in disqualification. All decisions of the Sponsor are final and binding.

All entries become the property of the Sponsor. Each Entrant acknowledges and agrees that the Sponsor may use information submitted to contact Entrant and/or to offer Sponsor’s products or services.

PRIZES

Two (2) Winners will be selected, whose ideas best advance the journalistic ideals of The Poynter Institute (“standing for journalism, serving democracy”). Each Winner will spend up to two (2) weeks during the Winter of 2011 at Poynter Institute located in St. Petersburg, Florida where they will receive guidance on their journalism and business idea. Each Winner will also receive up to $10,000 worth of services in such areas as contracted accounting, legal, research and / or promotional work, plus coaching and mentoring by Poynter faculty and Poynter’s Ford Fellows in Entrepreneurial Teaching. The total value of all Prizes to be awarded shall not exceed $20,000 ($10,000 per Winner) to be used for contracted accounting, legal, research and / or promotional services.

No alternative Prize, cash or other substitution is permitted except in the event of Prize unavailability. Sponsor reserves the right to substitute a Prize or Prizes of equal or greater value. Prizes are not transferable or assignable by the Winner, and may not be redeemed for cash.

Any federal, state and local taxes, fees, and surcharges, and any necessary or appropriate insurance, are the sole responsibility of the Winner. The Winner agrees to pay all such taxes, fees, and surcharges.

The Sponsor will provide up to $1,500 per week per Winner for transportation and living expenses, based on actual costs. Winner agrees to hold the Sponsor and Sponsor’s subsidiaries, affiliates, officers, directors, employees and agents harmless from any and all liability for damages or losses of any nature incurred in connection with the Prize, including but not limited to transit to and from any destination in connection with the Prize.

NOTIFICATION OF WINNER

The Poynter Institute will review all entries and identify Contest Finalists, who will receive a questionnaire via email or secure link on or before Friday, October 15, 2011. The total number of Contest Finalists will be based upon the caliber of the entries, to be determined at the sole discretion of the Sponsor. Finalists must submit their answers to the questionnaire via email or a secure link on or before 12:01 a.m. Eastern Time on Thursday, October 21, 2011. Winners will be notified by email or telephone on or before Wednesday, October 27, 2011.

If any Winner does not respond to the notification within twenty-four hours after notification by email or telephone, or any Winner does not meet all eligibility requirements including signing the Affidavit and Release referred to below, an alternate Winner will be selected from the Contest Finalists. Each Winner must produce adequate proof of identity, such as a driver license or photo I.D. card, in order to be awarded the Prize.

AFFIDAVIT AND RELEASE

The Winners will be required to sign and return an Affidavit of Eligibility and General Release, which includes an affirmation of eligibility, a release and waiver of legal claims, and consent to publicity. Failure to complete and sign the Affidavit of Eligibility and General Release will result in forfeiture of the Prize and its award to another Finalist.

CONTEST JUDGES

Judges for this Contest (and mentors for the Winners) are Bill Mitchell, leader of news transformation and entrepreneurship at Poynter, Wendy Wallace of Poynter’s entrepreneurship faculty and Poynter’s two Ford Fellows, Mark Briggs, co-founder of Serra Media and author of the books “Journalism 2.0″ and “Journalism Next,” and Jeremy Caplan, visiting professor in entrepreneurial journalism at the Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York and former reporter for TIME and Newsweek.

WINNER’S LIST

For a list of Prize Winners, send a self-addressed stamped envelope before November 15, 2010 to: Wendy W. Wallace, Entrepreneurship Faculty, 801 Third Street South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701

ADDITIONAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS

All federal, state, and local laws and regulations apply. Void where prohibited by law.

By entering the Contest, the entrant, for him/herself and for his/her heirs, executors, administrators, assigns and anyone else claiming by or through him/her, waives, covenants not to sue and fully releases and forever discharges any and all rights, claims or causes of action whatsoever that he/she may have against Sponsor arising directly or indirectly out of entrant’s participation in the Contest. For purposes of this waiver and release, “Sponsor” includes Poynter Institute and its subsidiaries, affiliates, officers, directors, employees and agents. This waiver and release covers, without limitation, any damage, liability, cost, attorneys’ fees and expenses whatsoever, whether known or unknown and whether foreseeable or not.

Sponsor reserves the right to make changes in the rules of the Contest, including the substitution of a Prize of equivalent value, which will become effective upon announcement.

Sponsor is not responsible for typographical or other errors in printing, the offering, or the administration of the Contest or in the announcement of the Prize.

SPONSOR

The Sponsor of the Contest is the Poynter Institute, 801 Third Street South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701.

Copyright 2010 The Poynter Institute. All Rights Reserved. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Wednesday, Oct. 06, 2010

Poynter’s NewsU and Knight Program in Media and Religion Offer New E-Learning Course

St. Petersburg, FL (Oct. 7, 2010) — Poynter’s e-learning project, News University, and the Knight Program in Media and Religion at the University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, announced today the launch of a new e-learning course on religion coverage designed for general assignment reporters, independent journalists and others who do not primarily cover religion as a beat.

The course, “Religion, Culture and Society: Getting Beyond the Cliches,” is offered free of charge, thanks to a grant from the Ford Foundation. The e-learning module addresses the need to integrate informed and intelligent writing about religion into all areas of news coverage, as demonstrated by recent hot-button topics such as Glenn Beck and the growth of the Tea Party movement, revisions to the social studies curriculum in Texas public schools, the debate over Park51 and renewed tensions around Israeli settlements in the West Bank.

As specialty beats such as religion are cut back in mainstream news media — and as online news and opinion websites grow — there is an increased need for savvy and sensitive treatment of religious ideas, trends and personalities by journalists across the board.

In addition to editors, producers and reporters, the self-directed e-learning course also will serve journalism educators seeking to integrate modules about religion into reporting and writing classes. The course includes interactive learning, best practices and online resources. It specifically addresses the intersection of religion with such subjects as politics, science, the environment and foreign affairs.

The need for enhanced understanding of religion’s role has never been greater, said Diane Winston, Knight Chair in Media and Religion at the USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism. “The recent Pew Forum survey revealed that Americans’ religious knowledge is poor to middling,” Winston said. “The e-course is an effective way for reporters to enhance what they know and make an impact on listeners, viewers and readers.”

Howard Finberg, director of interactive learning at The Poynter Institute, said the course is an important addition to the curriculum of Poynter’s NewsU. “It’s imperative that all journalists and journalism students know something about religion in today’s world,” he said. “This course addresses a key need for continuing education.”

For more information, go to www.newsu.org/courses/religion-culture-society
 
About Poynter’s News University
Poynter’s News University (www.newsu.org) offers training to journalists, journalism students, teachers and the public through more than 150 interactive e-learning modules and links to other journalism education and training opportunities.

About The Poynter Institute
The Poynter Institute trains journalism practitioners, media leaders, educators and citizens in the areas of online and multimedia, leadership and management, reporting, writing and editing, TV and radio, ethics and diversity, journalism education and visual journalism. Poynter’s website, (www.poynter.org) is the dominant provider of journalism news, with a focus on business analysis and the opportunities and implications of technology.

About the USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism
Located in Los Angeles at the University of Southern California, the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism is a national leader in education and scholarship in the fields of communication, journalism, public diplomacy and public relations. With an enrollment of more than 2,200 students, USC Annenberg offers doctoral, graduate and undergraduate degree programs, as well as continuing development programs for working professionals, across a broad scope of academic inquiry. The school’s comprehensive curriculum emphasizes the core skills of leadership, innovation, service and entrepreneurship and draws upon the resources of a networked university located in the media capital of the world.

Contact:
Howard Finberg, Director of Interactive Learning
The Poynter Institute
727-821-9494
hfinberg@poynter.org

Diane Winston
Knight Chair in Media and Religion
USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism
323-336-1851
dianewin@usc.edu

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Poynter to Assist McCormick Foundation with Specialized Reporting Institutes

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — The McCormick Foundation has selected Poynter to administer its 2011 Specialized Reporting Institutes (SRI) program, the popular series of intensive journalism workshops designed to provide subject-specific expertise and practical skills to working journalists. 

McCormick looks to Poynter to share its 35 years of training experience to increase the impact, effectiveness and visibility of the events. The $340,000 grant will cover Poynter’s costs and fund six to eight SRIs next year, one of which will be hosted by Poynter.

“The Institute’s experience, reach and resources, including our e-learning site, News University, enable us to enrich these important on-the-ground events,” said Poynter President Karen B. Dunlap. “We look forward to working with McCormick and next year’s SRI program hosts to help journalists cover stories that serve democracy.”

Clark Bell, the foundation’s journalism program director, said Poynter is the perfect choice to manage the SRI series.

“Poynter has conducted a number of our journalism trainings in the past, and we’ve always been highly satisfied with the results,” Bell said. “The organization’s knowledge, customer service and digital capabilities will only enhance the impact of the SRI program.”

Under the new partnership, Poynter will work with McCormick to create an online application process for organizations applying to host SRIs. Poynter will work with selected SRI hosts to create a custom training resource page on the News University website and to help measure outcomes of the events.
 
Typically, SRI hosts receive grants of $35,000-$50,000. An SRI is organized and administered by a non-profit host, which convenes a diverse group of 15-20 journalists, often from small to mid-sized news organizations, for a program lasting two to three days. Participants represent all media platforms, and grant funds cover all or most of participants’ travel, lodging and tuition.

The goals of a Specialized Reporting Institute are to:

  • Identify key sources and resources on the topic.
  • Develop story ideas for today, tomorrow and six months from now.
  • Enable reporters to meet like-minded colleagues for tips and support, during the training and beyond.
  • Build confidence for those new to the topic and help those more familiar to see new possibilities
  • Provide training and professional development to reporters working for smaller organizations, including community and ethnic media.
  • Share the learning with new tools and technology and by urging newsroom participants to host training for colleagues when they return home.

“I commend McCormick for the SRIs. They have long brought valuable information, insights, context and contacts to journalists,” Dunlap said. “In this digital era, when quality content must find its audience, Poynter is proud to be able to take the lessons of each SRI online, beyond the on-site walls, and reach thousands of journalists, academics, students and other content creators.”

About The Poynter Institute
Poynter trains journalism practitioners, media leaders, educators and other citizens in the areas of multimedia, leadership and management, reporting, writing and editing, ethics and diversity, journalism education and visual journalism. Poynter’s News University (www.newsu.org) offers interactive e-learning modules and links to other journalism education and training opportunities. Poynter’s website, (www.poynter.org) is the dominant provider of journalism news, with a focus on business analysis and the opportunities and implications of technology.

About the McCormick Foundation
The McCormick Foundation is a nonprofit organization committed to strengthening our free, democratic society by investing in children, communities and country. Through its grantmaking programs, Cantigny Park and Golf, museums, and civic outreach program the Foundation helps build a more active and engaged citizenry. It was established as a charitable trust in 1955, upon the death of Colonel Robert R. McCormick, the longtime editor and publisher of the Chicago Tribune. The McCormick Foundation is one of the nation’s largest charities, with more than $1 billion in assets. For more information, please visit www.McCormickFoundation.org.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Wendy Wallace, faculty, wwallace@poynter.org
; Jessica Sandler, marketing director, jsandler@poynter.org 
Phone: 1-888-POYNTER (1-888-769-6837)

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Friday, Oct. 01, 2010

Have a Journalism Startup Idea? Pitch it to Poynter

The ingredient list for a journalism startup once began with ink, presses and trucks. Now the recipe often starts with a domain, a niche and a strategy. The decline in launch costs has helped inspire a boom in journo startups. But just because it’s easier to start something doesn’t mean it’s easier to succeed.

What many journalism entrepreneurs need most is a path to sustainability. The Poynter Institute can help, thanks to 35 years of journalism training experience and a generous grant from the Ford Foundation.

Make your pitch to Poynter.

Spacer Spacer

Enter Poynter’s competition for online startups and you could win the Poynter Promise Prize. Two winners whose ideas best advance the journalistic ideals of The Poynter Institute (“standing for journalism, serving democracy”) will receive up to $10,000 each in contracted accounting, legal, research or promotion work, plus coaching and mentoring by Poynter faculty and our Ford Fellows in Entrepreneurial Teaching.

Winners will spend up to two weeks this winter at Poynter in St. Petersburg, Fla., receiving guidance on their journalism — and business — idea. Then, over the next six months, we’ll continue to coach the venture.

We’re looking for projects that would benefit most from incubation and whose progress might yield insights for other journalism startups around the country. Your business must already have initial funding, even if it is your own money. You must have an idea for a sustainable business model. You must be willing for Poynter to share our work together so that this project can be both a laboratory and a showcase for lessons learned.

Enter your pitch today. Here’s how:

Create a video by Tuesday, Oct. 12, that describes the news product or service you’re building. E-mail pitch@poynter.org with a link to the video. Include in your message the name of your project and your name and contact info.

Keep your video to under three minutes and tell us the basics of your business idea:

1) The problem/opportunity you seek to address
2) Your solution, or your idea
3) Who else is doing this
4) Your planned revenue streams
5) The skills and credentials of you and your team.

Poynter will review all entries and identify finalists, who will receive a follow-up questionnaire by Friday, Oct. 15. Finalists must submit their answers by Wednesday, Oct. 20. Winners will be notified by Wednesday, Oct. 27. Send any questions you may have to pitch@poynter.org.

Judges for this competition (and mentors for the winners) are Bill Mitchell, leader of entrepreneurial journalism programs at Poynter, Wendy Wallace, a member of Poynter’s entrepreneurship faculty, and Poynter’s two Ford Fellows, Mark Briggs, co-founder of Serra Media and author of the books “Journalism 2.0″ and “Journalism Next,” and Jeremy Caplan, visiting professor in entrepreneurial journalism at the Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York and longtime Time Magazine contributor. 

Let Poynter put you on the path to business and journalistic success. Make your pitch today. Be among the first to win the Poynter Promise Prize.
Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

Thursday, Sep. 09, 2010

Poynter’s NewsU Introduces New Certificate Program

St. Petersburg, FL (September 8, 2010) – Poynter’s e-learning project, News University, announced today the launch of its new Certificate Program, which is designed to help editors, publishers and educators assess a participant’s understanding of the journalism industry’s essential skills and best practices. In addition, the certificates can also be used by individuals interested in enhancing their skills and demonstrating a level of proficiency.

Individuals earn a certificate by successfully completing the assessments in a curriculum track of Poynter NewsU e-learning modules. Poynter NewsU currently offers three certificates, Understanding Journalism, Basic Reporting and Writing Skills, and Multimedia Basics. It also plans to launch additional certificates in the coming months.

“Many individuals are seeing opportunities to supplement their income by writing for both traditional media companies and the new content providers,” said Howard Finberg, director of interactive learning at The Poynter Institute. “These certificates allow users to brush up on their skills and show how much they know. For editors and publishers, these certificates offer a tool for finding the best candidates in a crowded marketplace.”

In addition to editors and professionals, Poynter NewsU believes educators may also find the certificates a valuable resource, both as a preassessment tool to gauge the skills of new students or throughout a semester to supplement other teaching materials. Poynter NewsU plans to offer custom certificates, which would allow professors and newsroom editors to create a combination of NewsU modules and assess the proficiency of their students and/or contributors. This custom certificate program is being tested this fall at the University of South Florida and Kent State University.

For more information about the Certificate Program, visit http://www.newsu.org/resources/certificates

About Poynter’s News University
Poynter’s News University (www.newsu.org) offers training to journalists, journalism students, teachers and the public through interactive e-learning modules and links to other journalism education and training opportunities.

About Poynter
The Poynter Institute trains journalism practitioners, media leaders, educators and citizens in the areas of online and multimedia, leadership and management, reporting, writing and editing, TV and radio, ethics and diversity, journalism education and visual journalism. Poynter’s website, (www.poynter.org) is the dominant provider of journalism news, with a focus on business analysis and the opportunities and implications of technology.

Contact:

Howard Finberg
Director, Interactive Learning
hfinberg@poynter.org
Read more

Tools:
0 Comments