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Michael Luo named editor of The New Yorker's website

Just a few months after joining The New Yorker, Michael Luo is moving up at the magazine. Luo, who was hired as The New Yorker's investigative editor in October, has been appointed editor of NewYorker.com. He replaces Nick Thompson, who left to run Wired after leading a years-long renaissance of the website. "Mike will help the site … Read More
NEWS

Wall Street Journal editor to staff: 'Muslim-majority country' isn't banned

The words "Muslim-majority country" are permitted in the Wall Street Journal, Editor-in-Chief Gerry Baker told his staff Tuesday, hours after being quoted telling editors to remove the phrase. "There is no ban on the phrase 'Muslim-majority country,'" Baker said. "But we should always be careful that this term is not offered as the only description of the countries covered under … Read More
NEWS

Samantha Bee will emcee 'Not the White House Correspondents' Dinner'

This year, Samantha Bee won't be a guest at the annual White House Correspondents' Association dinner — she'll be hosting her own. Bee, the host of "Full Frontal," on TBS, will be skewering President Trump on the same night that journalists are hobnobbing with their sources during a televised banquet in Washington, D.C. The event, called "Not the White House Correspondents’ … Read More
NEWS

15 rules for a saner news experience

There is little comfort in knowing that the crises we face in our political life today have been visited upon us before. It still helps to look back. George Santayana was only half-right when he said, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." He might have added: "Even those who do remember the past sometimes fail … Read More
NEWS

If your newsroom only has one meeting, make it this one

Meetings are usually a waste of time, but make an exception for this one. Every Friday, my team meets to discuss how the week went. We suggest ways to work together better, brainstorm and set goals. This end-of-week meeting is called a retrospective. It gives teams an opportunity to assess how their week went, talk about new ideas and recognize … Read More
NEWS

Culture guides how your newsroom reacts to everything that comes its way

Here’s something you don’t hear enough: Journalists, you’re doing a good job. Chances are good that you learned a new skill this year and put it into action. Maybe 2016 was the year you started using Snapchat to tell global stories. Perhaps you figured out how to use GIFs, or augmented your reporting with data. It’s also … Read More
NEWS

Dallas Morning News continues newsroom pizza chain with cookie delivery

There's a well-documented tradition of journalists sending pizza to their colleagues in other cities amid big, breaking news. It happened in Boston, Baltimore, Charleston and Orlando (Orlando actually got lots of food, including pizza). The Dallas Morning News also had a well-fed newsroom while covering the recent attack on … Read More
NEWS

Shallow coverage of Standing Rock is part of a bigger problem

With the election behind us, journalists are turning their attention to stories that took a back burner ahead of Nov. 8. One of them is a case study in the need for awareness, cultivating diverse sources and understanding the local ramifications of national news: the ongoing protest at Standing Rock Reservation. Suddenly, the intersection of big energy, commerce, and sovereignty … Read More
NEWS

Uni-Ball pens, Smirnoff and other things journalists are thankful for right now

Journalists, what are you thankful for this year? Last week, we asked readers to share their gratitudes. Here's what we heard: Ellie Smith, editor of the student newspaper at George Washington University, wrote in to share her thanks: "I'm thankful for independent student newspapers as a training ground for future reporters." Tiffany Esshaki, a staff writer at the … Read More
NEWS

Journalists, what are you thankful for this year?

No, seriously. 2016 has given journalists a lot of news that has been tough to cover: A long election, police killings in Dallas, a mass shooting in Orlando and, most recently, the loss of a beloved journalist. There's also been the relentless drip-drip-drip of layoffs and … Read More
NEWS

After this election, journalists must take care of themselves

Good morning journalists, and welcome to the rest of your life. You may have spent the past year following one of the candidates day in and day out and only eating when a campaign break allowed you to get a quick bite. You may have spent most of your time in arenas, getting booed by protesters (and coping with … Read More
NEWS

What's your newsroom eating that's not election night pizza?

Newsroom pizza is a well-established tradition, as is its place on election night. Two years ago, however, we noticed that not everyone was grabbing a slice while covering the results. If you're eating something other than pizza tonight in your newsroom, snap an image and tweet or email it to us and … Read More
NEWS

Here are some easy journalism-themed costume ideas

If you've been too busy covering the 2016 presidential election (or the rest of this crazy year) to think about what to dress up for on Monday, don't worry: We have some easy ideas. With 10 days left until the election, we've thought up some lighthearted ways to create a costume out of the events of a sometimes … Read More
NEWS

Broadway’s “The Front Page” offers a rowdy lesson in news history

"The Front Page," Broadway’s star-studded revival of the classic 1928 newspaper comedy, needs two types of reviews: one for general audiences and one for journalists. Since opening night last Thursday, most general reviews have been tepid at best. While critics praise Nathan Lane’s portrayal of profane, domineering Chicago Herald-Examiner editor Walter Burns, otherwise they tend to scald the show. As … Read More
NEWS

Meet the man who keeps retired Associated Press staffers connected

Most evenings, Paul Stevens starts pulling things together on his laptop from the couch in his Lenexa, Kansas home. He digs into files where he's saved stories his subscribers sent in, picks a few for the following day, and tunes in and out of whatever's on TV. The next morning, Stevens gets up and, as he did for most of … Read More
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