Using examples of compelling visual & interactive techniques in print & online, Sara Quinn offers tips on concept, craft and collaboration.

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Reporting under fire: CNN’s Ivan Watson stays calm

Photo courtesy CNN

In the months ahead, as I show journalists examples of excellent reporting, I will use a story that CNN’s senior international correspondent Ivan Watson filed this week.

Watson and his CNN crew flew in a helicopter with the Iraqi air force and fighters with the Kurdish peshmerga to drop supplies and rescue 20 or so Iraqis from Mount Sinjar, where they had fled attacks from the Sunni extremists of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

“We landed on several short occasions, and that’s where — amid this explosion of dust and chaos — these desperate civilians came racing towards the helicopter, throwing their children on board the aircraft. The crew was just trying to pull up as many people as possible,” Watson said.… Read more

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Monday, June 16, 2014

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Advice on publishing graphic photos from Iraq

It’s just a matter of time.

That’s what I told a Kalish Visual Editing workshop on the campus of Ball State University just last week. I told the group that it was a matter of time before they were forced to make a decision on a graphic photograph and they needed to be prepared to defend their decision.… Read more

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Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013

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Tips for Storytellers: How to make photos better

As a designer and editor, my projects have been made infinitely better because I’ve worked with stellar photojournalists. They’ve patiently schooled me on the importance of capturing the moment, finding the best light and thinking about composition. Here are a few tips. Part of a series of graphics with tips for storytellers, think of this as bite-sized inspiration. Next Friday: How to create your online portfolio and personal brand.

For a PDF: Quinn-fo-graphics: How to make photos better

Related: How to make the most of your tweets | How to get your video right |
How to polish your writingRead more

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Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013

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Tips for Storytellers: How to polish your writing

Lucky me. My office is two doors down from one of the world’s best writing coaches. I go to Roy Peter Clark often when writer’s block hits me. Here, you’ll find a few particularly helpful tips. Part of a series of graphics with tips for storytellers, think of this as bite-sized inspiration. Next Friday: How to make your photos better.

Poynter Quinn-fo-graphic: Polish your writing

For a PDF: Poynter Quinn-fo-graphic: How to polish your writing

Related: How to make the most of your tweets | How to shoot great videoRead more

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Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

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Tips for Storytellers: Get your video right

If you never trained for video, here are a few basic tips from Regina McCombs, senior editor for visual news at Minnesota Public Radio and Poynter adjunct faculty.

Part of a series of graphics with tips for storytellers, this infographic can be thought of as bite-sized inspiration.

Last Monday: How to make the most of your tweets Next Friday: Tips for polishing your writing, with Roy Peter Clark and others

For a PDF: Poynter Quinn-fo-graphics: Get your video right

Related training: Effective News Videos with Videolicious: A Digital Tools Tutorial, Oct. 30 | Key Elements to Compelling Video Storytelling, on-demand Webinar replay… Read more

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Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013

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Tips for Storytellers: How to make the most of your tweets

My Grandma Helfrey was a master storyteller, using voices and just the right sense of humor. Over the years at Poynter, I’ve met a host of great storytellers and I’ve loved seeing them perfect the tools of their trade—for writing, audio, video, photography, graphics, social media and more.

To summarize a few of the ideas that have stuck with me, I’ve created a series of graphics with tips for storytellers. Think of it as bite-sized inspiration. Here’s the first one: How to make the most of your tweets. On Friday: Tips for great video, with Regina McCombs and others.

Poynter Tips for Storyteller: How to Make the Most of Your Tweets by Sara Quinn

For a PDF: Tips for Storytellers: How to make the most of your tweetsRead more

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Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013

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8 tips for training, hiring young newsroom designers

Tracy Collins hired 40 of the 63 designers on his staff in one fell swoop last summer, getting many of his new employees directly out of college.

They joined him at Gannett’s Phoenix Design Studio, where an average of 14,000 pages are produced each week for nine daily newspapers.

Tracy Collins

That’s a heck of a lot of pages, and a pretty young staff.

The Phoenix studio is one of five U.S. design centers that produce Gannett papers — the others are Nashville, Tenn.; Des Moines, Iowa; Asbury Park, N.J.; and Louisville, Ky. This hub system for design is becoming more common as news organizations downsize, consolidate and seek more bang for their buck—Cox Media, McClatchy, and Media General have all pursued similar strategies.

The conversion hasn’t been pain-free for Gannett, Collins said in an in-person interview.… Read more

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

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How the National Post’s Gary Clement turns tweets into illustrated stories

Illustrator Gary Clement has a social media fling going this summer with readers of Canada’s National Post.

Each week, he tweets out a question using the hashtag #npsummer, then draws full-page cartoons to immortalize the readers’ replies. From summer romance and backyard barbecues to mishaps on camping trips and in summer school, he’s getting the skinny on his audience — 140 characters at a time.

Gary Clement

“I did one cartoon about summer jobs — that’s probably been the funniest one so far. I sort of ended up with drawings that gave people job tips,” he said by phone. “Job tips from a cartoonist — that’s funny. What do I know about working?”

“My theory was that people tweet sort of indiscriminately. I thought, why don’t I ask people for little bits of stories, and I will stitch them into some rich tapestry?… Read more

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Friday, July 12, 2013

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How The Verge used visuals to tell the delicate story of a face transplant

The ordeal of a woman who received a total face transplant is hard for an audience to fathom without seeing it. But Verge science editor Katie Drummond had a challenge beyond potentially making some readers squeamish: how to tell the story with the care and respect Carmen Tarleton deserved.

45-year-old Carmen Tarleton worked as a registered nurse in Thetford, Vt., before she was attacked by her husband in 2007. She has two daughters, Hannah and Liza.

Tarleton’s ex-husband attacked her with lye and a baseball bat in 2007, and media coverage afterward upset her because it prefaced stories with disclaimers like “‘warning, this footage is graphic and may disturb some viewers,’” Drummond wrote in an e-mail to Poynter.

That horrified Tarleton, Drummond wrote. “The idea that her own face was being treated as if she was some kind of monster, or that her disfigurement made her somehow less human.”

Drummond and the editors at The Verge wanted to respect Tarleton’s feelings.… Read more

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Wednesday, Mar. 20, 2013

How one illustrator approaches investigative reporting

Artist Marina Luz faced a journalistic challenge.

She had to illustrate the story of a young woman named “Jennifer,” who had been sexually abused in a state-run facility. But she could not use an image of Jennifer. What’s more, she couldn’t show what Jennifer or any of the other people in the story actually looked like.

Could we understand Jennifer — a troubled, young disabled woman — without actually seeing her?

Luz solved the problem with expressive drawings that were then paired with narration, music and a statement from Jennifer’s mother, read by an actor to further disguise their identities. Jennifer is not the young woman’s real name.

There are no bright colors in Luz’s renderings — only sketchy black lines and muted shades of brown, gray and blue.… Read more

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