Bethune Cookman FIU Football

Journalists are losing access, but the public still expects the story

This weekend, Florida International University opened its 2014 football season at home in Miami against Bethune-Cookman University. The game was close, ending when FIU fumbled a field goal attempt that would have won the game as time ran out.

Pretty good game, I’m guessing. But I’m only going on the six paragraphs that ran on the Miami Herald’s website under a byline: “From Miami Herald Wire Services.”

The Herald decided not to cover the game. Why?

Because FIU refused to give a press pass to the Herald’s FIU beat reporter, David J. Neal.

In a statement issued Saturday and placed atop the Herald’s original story on the flap, FIU said:

“We did not issue a media credential to the Herald’s beat reporter because of concerns we have brought up to the Herald’s reporter and editors over the past few years about the reporter’s interactions with our student athletes, coaches, and staff and the nature of the resulting coverage.”

“As far as we can tell,” Managing Editor Rick Hirsch said in the Herald’ story, “David has done a diligent, thorough job of reporting on the Golden Panthers.… Read more

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P-Labor Day

Today in media history: ‘The Workingmen’s Picnic’ and other early Labor Day reports

What was the news coverage like for the first Labor Day celebrations? The Library of Congress and its “Chronicling America” collection gives us some newspaper examples and this description of the first parade:

On September 5, 1882, some 10,000 workers assembled in New York City to participate in America’s first Labor Day parade. After marching from City Hall, past reviewing stands in Union Square, and then uptown to 42nd Street, the workers and their families gathered in Wendel’s Elm Park for a picnic, concert, and speeches. This first Labor Day celebration was eagerly organized and executed by New York’s Central Labor Union, an umbrella group made up of representatives from many local unions. Debate continues to this day as to who originated the idea of a workers’ holiday, but it definitely emerged from the ranks of organized labor at a time when they wanted to demonstrate the strength of their burgeoning movement and inspire improvements in their working conditions.

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Friday, Aug. 29, 2014

A&E Networks purchase stake in Vice Media

The Hollywood ReporterNew York Times | The Huffington Post | Financial Times |

A&E Networks will pay $250 million for a 10 percent stake in Vice Media, a deal that values the company at 2.5 billion, Paul Bond wrote in The Hollywood Reporter Friday.

Earlier in the day, Time Warner dropped its bid to purchase a stake in Vice Media, a deal reportedly fell through because the two companies could not agree how much Vice Media was worth, Jonathan Mahler wrote for The New York Times. He wrote one possible outcome for the deal might have included giving Vice control of HLN, a network owned by Time Warner that has seen flagging ratings recently.

Vice chief executive Shane Smith told Financial Times that the investment from A&E was “a great deal,” adding that it will enable the company to grow for another three years.… Read more

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Intercept redesign shows article pageview counter

The Intercept

The Intercept debuted a new look Friday, shrinking its navigation bar, adding a pageview counter and reconfiguring the homepage layout.

The new design allows readers to see more content — one prominent story and four secondary stories — without having to scroll.

Here’s a look at the transformation:

Before:

After:

The new icon next to the tally of comments for each story indicates how many pageviews the article received. The new feature is meant to help readers choose between stories, said John Cook, editor-in-chief at the Intercept.

 

“Gawker publishes traffic data, so does Business Insider,” Cook said. “It’s an easy way for readers to gauge which stories on the front page might be more interesting.

Also new is a “most popular” sidebar that stays frozen on the left side of the page as users scroll:

Intercept co-founder Glenn Greenwald referred to the redesign as “stage 1,” on Twitter, implying that more change might be on the way:

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Businesswoman stressed out

Overworked and overwhelmed? Consider these 7 questions

If you’re feeling swamped at work these days, you’re not alone. I’m not talking “I don’t get to go out for lunch very often” busy. I mean “I’m buried in work, never fully off the clock and still feel I’m letting people down” busy. I hear it regularly from the managers I teach and coach.

It’s a function of the downsized staffing but increased demands and responsibilities in changing organizations.

The story is familiar: to hit budget numbers, the company cuts head count but leaves fully intact the expectation of quality, service and measurable results. (I’ll give CNN president Jeff Zucker credit. Referencing the depressing specter of buyouts and layoffs, he didn’t try to spin it as some great opportunity for the survivors to work smarter, not harder.… Read more

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Bar b cue barbecue fire BBQ coal fire iron grill

Texas Monthly BBQ editor travels ‘from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket’

Happy Labor Day weekend. Andrew Beaujon’s back on Tuesday. Thanks for reading this week.

  1. Ask him about his cholesterol: The nation’s only full-time barbecue editor — no, he doesn’t weigh 400 pounds — understands why readers are obsessed with his health: “My job requires that I travel from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket, one of the fattiest cuts on the steer. And I can’t forget to order the pork ribs, sausage, and beef ribs,” Daniel Vaughn writes. Former Texas Monthly editor in chief Jake Silverstein says Vaughn has “figured out how to make the barbecue lifestyle compatible with staying above ground.” (Texas Monthly)
  2. What to do when you’re arrested: Whether it happened in Ferguson or elsewhere, first you should call the station where you were booked to get your arrest report.
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Screen Shot 2014-08-29 at 2.59.11 PM

So you got arrested in Ferguson, now what?

If you’re Matthew Giles, an NYU grad student studying in the Media, Culture and Communications department, then the answer has a few components.

1. Try and get your arrest record through a variety of ways.
2. Try and get disassociated from a group of protesters whose members were arrested on the same night.

Giles went to St. Louis and into Ferguson on August 14 with another student to talk with protesters and journalists.

“My focus was specifically on my Master’s thesis, which looks at media spectacle and the differences in each individual’s lived experiences vs. what comes up on national media,” he wrote in an email. (We also spoke on the phone.)

Giles got to know all of that for himself pretty well in Ferguson.

On Sunday, August 17th, he was arrested around 9 p.m.… Read more

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P-Hurricane Katrina

Today in media history: Reporting the tragic story of Hurricane Katrina

On August 24, 2005, a tropical storm is given the name Katrina. It hits Florida and after growing in the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Katrina makes landfall 60 miles southeast of New Orleans on the morning of August 29th.

(Video from National Geographic: “Hurricane Katrina Day by Day”)

The New Orleans Times-Picayune and the Biloxi-Gulfport Mississippi Sun Herald are awarded a Pulitzer Prize for their coverage.

September 1, 2005

An excerpt from a story in the Sun Herald:

Frustration at slow emergency response grows on Mississippi coast
By Scott Dodd

“BILOXI — Overwhelming need gripped the Mississippi Coast two days after Hurricane Katrina dealt the region a devastating blow.

In the hardest-hit areas, where hundreds of people lost their homes, cars and everything they own, parents wandered the streets Wednesday begging for water for their babies, and local officials grew frustrated at the slow response.

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Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014

Veterens Day

The VA story the networks didn’t cover this week

This story originally appeared on the PunditFact website. Poynter.org is republishing with permission.

Back in May, anyone who tuned in to almost any news show was guaranteed to hear about administrative delays that caused the deaths of 40 veterans at a VA hospital in Phoenix. Sometimes, the charge was softened a bit and news anchors talked about how the delays "might have" led to the deaths, but the general message was clear: Mismanagement, and even criminal deceit, had cut short the lives of people who had served their country.

On Tuesday, the Office of Inspector General at the Veterans Affairs Department issued its final report on the matter. While it confirmed a manipulation of scheduling records that it called unethical and in some cases criminal, it refuted the allegation that drove the headlines in May.… Read more

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Diane Sawyer

After Sawyer’s final ABC World News broadcast, all 3 nightly anchors are now white men

Yo. Here are some media stories.

  1. Is the Yo app ridiculous or revolutionary? That’s the question Cory Blair asks. It’s definitely the former, but it has potential to be the latter, especially now that users can send links and not just notifications with no content. Robert Hernandez has an interesting idea for what news organizations like The Washington Post could use Yo for: “whenever an unarmed person dies at the hands of the police, or every time somebody is killed with a gun.” (American Journalism Review)
  2. Diane Sawyer anchors her final ABC World News broadcast: But she’s staying with the network. David Muir is her successor. “Now, all three nightly news anchors are once again white men,” Brian Stelter notes. (CNN)
  3. NPR’s Michel Martin heads to Ferguson: The former “Tell Me More” host will lead a town hall meeting today.
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