P-King Speech

Today in media history: Dr. Martin Luther King’s 1963 ‘I Have a Dream’ speech

August 28, 1963
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivers his “I Have a Dream” speech to an estimated 200,000 people on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington. Time Magazine reports:

“I have a dream,” King cried. The crowd began cheering, but King, never pausing, brought silence as he continued. “I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. I have a dream,” he went on, relentlessly shouting down the thunderous swell of applause, “that even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with people’s injustices, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.” Cheers.

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Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014

Michael Sam

Resources for reporters on all beats (including sports) who cover LGBT people

Outsports | The Washington Post

On Wednesday, ESPN apologized for making a story out of NFL player Michael Sam and his “shower habits,” Cindy Boren reported Wednesday for The Washington Post. From Boren’s story:

“ESPN regrets the manner in which we presented our report. Clearly yesterday we collectively failed to meet the standards we have set in reporting on LGBT-related topics in sports.”

Jim Buzinski wrote about the apology as well for Outsports.

(Reporter Josina) Anderson’s report generated widespread criticism after its tone-deaf examination of whether Sam was showering with his teammates or waiting until later. She quoted one unnamed player as saying that Sam was “respecting their space” and that he “seemed to be waiting” to take a shower. This led Rams All-Pro lineman Chris Long to tweet: “Dear ESPN, everyone but you is over it.”

The Rams’ season begins on Sept.… Read more

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NPR’s Michel Martin heading to Ferguson: ‘Talking is the one thing we can all do’

St. Louis Public Radio

NPR’s Michel Martin will moderate a town hall meeting at Wellspring Church in Ferguson, Missouri, on Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m. St. Louis Public Radio reports that the event is open to the public and there’s no cost to attend. Martin, who was previously the host of “Tell Me More,” appeared on St. Louis Public Radio’s “St. Louis on the Air” on Tuesday.

“Talking is the one thing we can all do,” she said.

I think one of the things that we hope to do in our field … is show people that you can have these conversations, important ones, difficult ones, painful ones, but you can have them and have them in a way that are constructive. That’s gonna be our task going forward.

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holder-ferguson

Fact-checking claims about race after Ferguson shooting

This story originally appeared on the PunditFact website. Poynter.org is republishing with permission.

The shooting of 18-year-old African-American Michael Brown by a Ferguson, Mo., police officer has led to a broader discussion of race in America. PunditFact has recently fact-checked several claims centering on race.

No. 1 cause of death for young black men

Fox pundit Juan Williams recently expounded upon a column he wrote for the Wall Street Journal in which he described "thuggish behavior" as creating a culture of violence in African-American communities.

"The violent behavior of young black men and the police response have become a window on racial fears," Williams wrote. On Fox News Sunday Williams said, "On the black side of this equation, I think there’s fear of intimidation, harassment being legitimized by the fact that there is a high rate of crime, especially among young black men.… Read more

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Avalanche

Snow-blind: The challenge of voice and vision in multi-media storytelling

There has been no American feature story more honored – or over-praised – than “Snow Fall” by the New York Times. I don’t want the key word in that last sentence – over-praised – to detract from the story’s historic achievement. It won a Pulitzer Prize in 2013 for feature writing; it set a standard for multi-media reporting at a time when we were wondering about the viability of that form of storytelling; and it attracted attention from far and wide, lending encouragement that journalism in the digital age has an exciting future.

Cheers to the writer, John Branch, to graphics director Steve Duenes, and to the team that created it.

Much of the original praise for the work was worshipful and, I believe, superficial. The dazzling visual effects were there for all to see and left potential critics, dare I use the term, snow-blind.… Read more

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Forecast: Digital ad revenue to jump 17% this year, magazine ad revenue to fall 11%

Wednesday already? Here we go.

  1. Digital ad revenue to pass TV in 2017: According to Magna Global forecasts, “television revenues are expected to grow 2.2% this year,” Nathalie Tadena writes. “Newspaper and magazine ad revenue are expected to decline 8.9% and 11% respectively, while digital ad revenues are expected to jump 17% this year to $50 billion.” (The Wall Street Journal) | “The research firm declared digital ad revenue will hit $72 billion by 2017, pulling slightly ahead of television at $70.5 billion.” (The Wrap)
  2. The perils of freelance war reporting: GlobalPost went “above and beyond” in working for James Foley’s release before he was killed by Islamic State militants, according to Medill’s Ellen Shearer. “But other freelancers may not get that kind of backing or have access to the infrastructure that a staff journalist would, she said.” (AP via NYT) | Freelance journalist Austin Tice, who has been missing for two years, is believed to be held by the Syrian government, Lara Jakes reports.
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P-1812

Today in media history: New York Post reports the British have attacked Washington, D.C.

Here are two events that happened on this date and a trivia question.

August 27, 1814
The New York Post reports that the British army has attacked Washington, D.C. The invasion became one of the key military engagements during the War of 1812. According to the book, “Encyclopedia of American Journalism,” “The American press played an important role in the years of growing tension. Newspapers provided information about the arguments with Great Britain prior to the war and details of the military conflict once war was declared.” On this date in 1814, The New York Post writes:

This day we have the disagreeable task of recording the capture and destruction of the city of Washington, the capital of the United States!….Is it possible that after being two years at war, our capital, the seat of our general government should have been left so defenseless?

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Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014

yuri

Video: Vox’s Yuri Victor started out in economics, ‘got drunk and became a journalist’

Yuri Victor, Senior UX Designer at Vox.Com, was at The Poynter Institute to give a TedX talk about creating efficient newsrooms. After his talk, he answered questions about how he got into journalism and what it means to him.

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Police Shooting Missouri

Missouri professor: ‘You could teach a whole course on Ferguson’

The story of Michael Brown’s death and the city of Ferguson, of riots and protests, tear gas, arrests, a funeral and calls for action isn’t just one to watch because it’s news. For some journalism professors in Missouri, it’s a course on how news is created in 2014.

And for Amber Hinsley, Earnest Perry and Dan Kozlowski, it’s now also part of their latest curriculum.

“You could teach a whole course on Ferguson,” said Dan Kozlowski, an associate professor of communications at St. Louis University. This semester, Kozlowski teaches a First Amendment course called “Free Expression,” and he teaches media law in the spring. He’s not teaching a whole course on Ferguson, but there are issues from the past two weeks that will make it into his classes.… Read more

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Grammar Girl: ‘I had wanted to be a professor, but I had given up on that dream’

Fogarty. Credit: Patrick Fogarty

That or which? Lie or lay? And where does that pesky comma go? The woman — or girl — who’s built a personal empire around guiding students and professionals through the thickets of grammar and usage recently added another job to a resume that includes writing books, public speaking and entrepreneurship — professor.

Mignon Fogarty, also known as “The Grammar Girl,” was recently named the Donald W. Reynolds Chair in Media Entrepreneurship at the University of Nevada, Reno’s Reynolds School of Journalism. Poynter caught up with Fogarty about her new job and what will happen to her website during the transition.

How did this opportunity come up for you?

I gave a guest lecture in Nico Colombant’s radio class last year in the Reynolds School, and the students were all creating podcasts.… Read more

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