Tribune wants to buy more newspapers

Crain’s Chicago Business

Tribune Publishing CEO Jack Griffin wants to buy “smaller newspapers in or near his existing markets,” Lynne Marek reports.

“We think there are more of these opportunities around the country that are geographically adjacent to where we run big papers and big brands, and that over time we can achieve similar kinds of consolidation and acquisition opportunities that are going to add meaningfully to our footprint and our revenue and our profit,” Griffin told Marek.

In the past year, Tribune’s Baltimore Sun Media Group has purchased Baltimore City Paper and two smaller Maryland papers, The Capital in Annapolis and the Carroll County Times.

Griffin also told Marek that cutting costs to adapt to lower revenue is “an absolute requirement of the business.” Tribune Publishing’s spinoff from Tribune Co.… Read more

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New York Times Sales

NYT’s new digital apps and subscriptions are off to a bumpy start

On the surface, the New York Times Co. had a very positive headline number as part of its second quarter earnings report today — a 32,000 digital circulation increase, driven by three newly introduced digital services.

But in a subsequent conference call with analysts, executives were quick to concede that the launch of NYT Now, NYT Opinion and Times Premier has been anything but smooth.

Several months in, the Times is still trying to get offers, terms and audience targeting right, especially with the NYT Now app aimed at smartphone users, said Denise Warren, who directs digital products for the company. As result, the company fell short of its initial goals for new subscribers and revenues. NYT Opinion is also a smartphone app with a separate subscription tier.… Read more

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NYT looking into claim one of its reporters swiped from Wikipedia

FishbowlNY

Carol Vogel’s July 24 New York Times story about the artist Piero di Cosimo includes the following description:

He is said to have been terrified of thunderstorms and so pyrophobic that he rarely cooked his food, subsisting mostly on hard-boiled eggs that he prepared 50 at a time while heating glue for his art. He didn’t clean his studio. He didn’t trim the trees in his orchard. Giorgio Vasari, the Renaissance biographer, described Piero as living “more like a beast than a man.”

And here is part of the Wikipedia entry for Piero: … Read more

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NYT says its Gaza photos are real

BagNews

The New York Times says Atlantic senior editor David Frum is incorrect to claim that some photos taken in Gaza last week were faked or staged. “David Frum’s claims are false,” Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Poynter. Frum sent several tweets last week claiming the photos were faked.

“We have a complete account from the photographer, Sergey Ponomarev, who arrived with two other photographers to a local hospital as ambulances began arriving with dead and wounded civilians following an Israeli military strike on the outskirts of Khan Younis,” Murphy writes in an email.

Ponomarev “witnessed the man covered in blood in this photo arrive in an ambulance with a badly wounded elderly man (who ultimately died),” Murphy writes.… Read more

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New York Times Sales

New York Times adds 32,000 digital-only subscribers as profit falls

The New York Times

The New York Times added 32,000 digital subscribers in the second quarter of 2014, the company reported today. The number was driven by its new products — the NYT Now and NYT Opinion apps and the new Times Premier subscription tier.

Paid digital-only subscribers now total 831,000, the company said. Revenue from those subscriptions jumped 13.5 percent, to $41.7 million, from the same period a year ago. Total circulation revenue increased 1.4 percent.

The company’s total revenue fell 0.6 percent to $388.7 million. While digital ad revenue increased 3.4 percent, the Times reported, that was again not nearly enough to offset a print ad revenue decrease of 6.6 percent. Overall ad revenue declined 4.1 percent.

The Times’ adjusted operating profit dropped 21 percent.… Read more

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CC USA Medien

Employment tumbles again at newspapers, and First Look’s plans shift

Good morning. Here are 10 (OK, maybe not exactly 10) media stories.

  1. The newspaper business lost 1,300 employees last year: “The overall revenue figure, as measured by the Newspaper Association of America, was down 2.6 percent in 2013, close to an even match with the percentage of news job cuts for the year,” Rick Edmonds writes. (Poynter) | One small bright spot: Minority employment was up, after years of stagnating. (Poynter)
  2. An update on First Look Media: “We have definitely rethought some of our original ideas and plans,” Pierre Omidyar writes. (First Look Media) | Jay Rosen: “For First Look the way to a large user base isn’t ‘one big flagship website’ or an ‘everything you need to know’ news app to go up against, say, the Guardian or npr.org.” (PressThink) | Mathew Ingram: “More than anything else, what Omidyar is describing sounds like a real-time journalism lab, one that will test out different ways of interacting with readers around a topic — albeit a lab that happens to have a quarter of a billion dollars behind it.” (Gigaom)
  3. Margot Adler, R.I.P.
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Minority employment in newsrooms rose in 2013

Minority employees accounted for a little more than 13 percent newsrooms in 2013, according to a new survey by the American Society of News Editors. That’s a percentage point higher than last year’s census, which suggested diversity efforts had stagnated at the newsrooms ASNE surveys, which include many daily newspapers and this year more than 100 online-only publications.

The percentage of minority employees in this year’s census, 13.34, is “nearly as high as the record of 13.73 percent in 2006,” ASNE says. The industry added about 200 more full-time minority employees in 2013. That gain is a rare, if small, bit of good news in an otherwise somber report, which, as my coworker Rick Edmonds writes, shows an industry-wide loss of 1,300 jobs.… Read more

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Newspaper industry lost another 1,300 full-time editorial professionals in 2013

The American Society of News Editors annual newsroom census, released today, found a net loss of another 1,300 full-time professionals last year.

That was better than the 2,600 net job loss in 2012 but brings total newsroom employment at newspaper organizations to roughly 36,700, a decline of 3.2 percent from the 38,000 counted in last year’s census.

Newsroom employment has fallen 33 percent from a pre-recession peak of 55,000 in 2006 and is down 35 percent from its all-time high of 56,900 in 1989.

Asked for reaction to the 2013 census total, ASNE president David Boardman, dean of the Temple University School of Media and Communications,  told me by phone, “Well, here we go again….Obviously we should all continue to be concerned about the losses.”

The census has been conducted since 1978 to measure progress in newsroom diversity. … Read more

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Monday, July 28, 2014

phoneburnbed100

Cell Sets Fire to Pillow, Story Sets Fire to TV Station Website

A news report about a small fire with no injuries took the internet by storm last week. The question is why.

The story is about a Dallas area teen who says her cellphone caught fire beneath her pillow as she slept

The teen went to sleep with her Samsung Galaxy S4 under her pillow and awoke to a smouldering mess, according to KDFW, a Dallas-Fort Worth Fox affiliate. The father of the teen told KDFW he thinks the phone battery may have caused the meltdown, Samsung says the battery was not an original part but was a replacement unit.

The video has generated more than 1.1 million YouTube Views, 4 million page views on the station’s website and generated even more for the other Fox owned and operated stations that posted the story. … Read more

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Survey: Women and minorities on TV and radio reach a high that’s still pretty low

RTDNA

The number of minorities at radio stations reached a ’90s-era high, and women news directors in TV reached an all-time high according to the latest report, released Monday afternoon, from RTDNA/Hofstra University Annual Survey.

Still, as far as minorities are concerned, the bigger picture remains unchanged. In the last 24 years, the minority population in the U.S. has risen 11 points; but the minority workforce in TV news is up less than half that (4.6), and the minority workforce in radio is up 2.2.

Some other points from the report:

– In TV news, minorities made up more than 22 percent of total employment, marking a 13 year high.
– Smaller stations have more minorities.
– On TV, “For the first time, black women outnumber black men.… Read more

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