EW SCRIPPS HEADQUARTERS

Scripps and Journal is just the latest in a series of mega broadcast mergers

There is an underlying fact that makes the Scripps and Journal deal make sense: Broadcasting is still profitable. Second quarter earnings have been strong and topped last year’s numbers.

Wall Street loves broadcasting, and bigger broadcast companies do better than smaller ones these days. Bigger companies have more leverage to negotiate retransmission deals with cable companies. Once this deal is approved, Scripps will be the powerhouse owner of ABC stations, which gives the company leverage to influence the network. Scripps stock hit five-year highs Thursday in response to the news that the company was spinning off its newspapers from the broadcast and online properties.

Wednesday’s  deal is part of a mosaic of mega-media mergers that have produced super-sized broadcast owners that are more than twice the size of what they were only a decade ago.… Read more

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Tumblr page shows how much news orgs pay photographers

PetaPixel | Who Pays Photographers?

“Who Pays Photographers?” is a Tumblr that takes anonymous submissions about who pays how much to photojournalists.

On Wednesday, Gannon Burgett wrote about the page for PetaPixel.

As photographers, one of the most difficult aspects of using it as a form of income is determining what is and isn’t deemed appropriate compensation for our work.

An almost taboo topic amongst photographers and even more so amongst editorial clients, the talk of pay is one that rarely gets brought to the front-lines. Ultimately, this leaves those looking to get into editorial gigs have a much larger barrier to entry, as less information is known by both parties.

The page credits the Tumblr page “Who Pays Writers” for the inspiration. Submissions include the Wall Street Journal, the Associated Press and Texas A&M’s university newspaper, The Battalion.… Read more

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Lede of the day (it involves Rob Ford, deadmau5 and espresso)

Associated Press

There’s no byline attached to this AP story about Toronto Mayor Rob Ford ordering five espressos, which is a real pity.

TORONTO (AP) – Famed DJ deadmau5 asked Rob Ford to go for a coffee run in his Ferrari and was jolted by the Toronto mayor’s order: five espressos in one cup.

But the last three lines of the story are remarkable as well.

Ford asks the teller twice if there’s five shots and later says he throws the “espressos back. I do.”

Ford admitted last year that he had smoked crack in a “drunken stupor.”

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LAURA

Future of Homicide Watch D.C. uncertain as Amico joins Boston Globe

In 2012, Laura Amico got a call that changed a lot of things — her city, her work and, eventually, her future

Amico, who lived and worked in Washington, D.C., had been selected to be a Nieman-Berkman fellow at Harvard University, where she would research how the Web could be applied to criminal justice journalism. She was eager to go, but she knew moving to Cambridge for a year would mean leaving behind Homicide Watch, a project she and her husband Chris Amico created together to catalog every single homicide in the D.C. area. She didn’t want the site to wither.

“This thing that I’d built from nothing really had a place in the community,” Amico said.

Laura Amico (submitted photo)

She and her husband — who eventually made the move to Cambridge permanent — raised more than $47,000 on Kickstarter and were able to hire student journalists to keep the site running in their absence.… Read more

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New York Times Slim

NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia

Good morning. 10-ish, anyone?

  1. NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia: Part of a July 25 column “used specific language and details from a Wikipedia article without attribution; it should not have been published in that form,” a grisly editor’s note reads. (NYT) | Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Ravi Somaiya “editors have dealt with Carol on the issue.” (NYT) | “It seems to me that there can be little dispute about the claim,” Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote Wednesday. “Anyone can see the similarity.” (NYT)
  2. E.W. Scripps Co. and Journal Communications will combine broadcast properties, spin off newspapers: The companies “are so similar and share the deep commitment to public service through enterprise journalism,” Scripps Chairman Richard A.
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PDLayoff.jpg

How mass layoffs in 2013 changed the lives of former Plain Dealer staffers

On July 31, 2013, after the layoff calls came, some of the current and now-former staff of The Plain Dealer got together for drinks at Market Garden Brewery in Cleveland. Newsrooms around the country called in and bought drinks for those gathered — $4,933 worth of drinks, Eric Sandy reported the next day for Cleveland Scene.

That day, more than 50 people had been laid off from The Plain Dealer.

“We drank for free all night,” John Horton remembered.

“It was bittersweet because we were together, we were supporting each other but we knew that so many of us, myself included, were not going to be going back to the building ever again,” Ellen Kleinerman said.

Plain Dealer staff gathered on layoff day: July 31, 2013.

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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Scripps, Journal Communications will combine broadcast groups, spin off newspapers

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel | Scripps

E.W. Scripps Co. and Journal Communications announced an agreement Wednesday night to combine their broadcast assets and turn their newspapers into a separate company, Bill Glauber reports in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Among the 15 newspapers that the new Journal Media Group will hold: The (Memphis, Tennessee) Commercial Appeal, the Knoxville (Tennessee) News Sentinel and the Kitsap Sun of Bremerton, Washington. All of those were previously owned by Scripps; the Journal Sentinel is Journal Communications’ biggest paper.

With 35 stations, Scripps will become the fifth-largest independent TV group in the country after the deal goes through. It also picks up Journal Communications’ 34 radio stations.

“It is no surprise that Scripps would want to move its broadcasting and digital properties from the print holdings just as it moved its considerable cable holdings some time ago,” Poynter’s Al Tompkins said in an email.… Read more

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Sochi Olympics Pussy Riot

Could the c-word soon be finding its way into news headlines?

If orange is the new black, then the c-word may be becoming the new f-word? It certainly seems that way. With the f-word drifting to more common usage, we need another word for its shock value.

When I write c-word, I do not mean “cable.” But it is on cable television where the c-word is creeping out of the shadows. Tony Soprano and his cronies used it. I hear it on episodes of the popular fantasy drama Game of Thrones, sometimes used to describe a body part, more often as a corrosive epithet against women and men.

Surprisingly, the c-word has taken on a political connotation. In his comedy routines and on his HBO show, Bill Maher has described Sarah Palin as a c—. He defends the use on First Amendment grounds: that Palin is a public figure and that nasty name calling is as old as the Republic.… Read more

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Guards at empty prison threaten news crew with arrest

WNYT | Albany Times Union

A TV news crew with WNYT in Albany, New York, was threatened with arrest while filming a piece about Grant Cottage on Mount McGregor, WNYT reported last Thursday. While filming outside the nearly closed Mount McGregor Correctional Facility in Wilton, New York, Mark Mulholland and Matt Soriano were stopped by a correctional officer and told to stop filming.

The two told him they were doing a piece on Grant Cottage, a state historic site.

“No filming,” said the officer, who identified himself as Lt. Dorn.
“We’re doing a story on Grant’s Cottage,” Mulholland tried to explain.
“It doesn’t matter,” the officer continued. After a few more exchanges he then said, “You’re going to leave the mountain now.”

Police eventually arrived after an odd scene that includes another correctional employee blocking the entrance to the state historic site and then driving really slowly in front of the two journalists.… Read more

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Ken Armstrong joins The Marshall Project

Armstrong. Photo by Steve Ringman (The Seattle Times)

Ken Armstrong, an investigative reporter for The Seattle Times, will join the staff of The Marshall Project in the coming weeks, Marshall Project editor-in-chief Bill Keller confirmed Tuesday.

Armstrong, who has worked at The Seattle Times for about 11 years, said he made the move partly because The Marshall Project will give him an opportunity to tell stories in a variety of different ways. He’s already pitched stories for radio, magazine stories and “classic long-term investigations,” he said.

Armstrong began talking with Keller about the possibility of working full-time for The Marshall Project after submitting a freelance pitch for the site in March, Keller said. He assigned the pitch, and Armstrong followed up with a list of stories he’d like to cover.… Read more

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