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Gawker Media alleges ‘serious irregularity’ in Hulk Hogan sex-tape evidence

Hogan. (AP)

Hogan. (AP)

Last week, Gawker Media prevailed in a legal battle it had been waging with the FBI for more than a year.

A judge ruled that the bureau and another law enforcement agency had to turn over evidence related to an investigation into a sex tape that figures prominently into Gawker’s pending high-stakes lawsuit.

But during a hearing today, lawyers from Gawker Media expressed concerns about the evidence.

Representatives from Gawker Media, the FBI and the Executive Office of United States Attorneys appeared before a judge at a United States District Court in Tampa, Florida. The purpose of the hearing was to sort out which documents requested by Gawker under the Freedom of Information Act the law enforcement organizations were legally obligated to turn over. Read more

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This short week on Medium: 5 media stories you may have missed

It’s a short week, but there has been some good stuff on Medium about journalism and for journalists. In case you missed it, here are five of those stories, including how people first found out about the Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling, where to find great stock photos and more on a new cartoonist collective:

June 26, 2015: A snapshot in love: Locals and visitors to San Francisco’s annual Pride Parade share the moment they found out same-sex marriage is now legal in the United States.

June 29, Alice Yin:

“I was at home actually. I was at home on the Internet and I read it on Facebook. I cried. I cried and the first thing I did was call my fiancé and say that we could get married in this state.”

“When are you planning on that?”

“Beginning of next year.”

These 39 Sites Have Amazing Stock Photos You Can Use For Free

July 1, Thomas Oppong:

It can be insanely hard to find high quality, high-res free stock photos for personal and commercial use.

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News crew mugged while reporting from a crime scene

KNTV

A news crew with KNTV was mugged and pistol-whipped on Thursday morning while reporting from the scene of a crime, the station reported Thursday.

The brazen attack occurred just before 6 a.m. at Pier 14 in San Francisco, where the reporter and photographer were covering a story about a woman who had been shot to death there the night before.

As the two were about to go on air, a suspect pulled up to the curb in a black four-door BMW and approached the photographer and pistol-whipped him with a gun, shoved him to the ground, the photographer and reporter said. The suspect then grabbed the photographer’s camera gear, and as he was struggling to get it inside his getaway car, returned to pistol whip the photographer again, the news crew reported.

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Court orders Gawker Media v. Hulk Hogan trial date canceled

A Florida appellate court ruled Thursday that a legal showdown between Gawker Media and Hulk Hogan will no longer take place on Monday because a lower court overlooked a legal rule when scheduling the trial date.

The ruling, issued by Florida’s Second District Court of Appeal, states that a circuit court erred when it set a July 6 trial date because it didn’t allow for enough time to pass between the last motion related to the case and the trial date. From the ruling:

Although we easily understand why Bollea and the circuit court went to lengths to preserve the July 6 trial date, their efforts were futile from the outset — by the time the court entered its June 19 order scheduling the trial for July 6, the window for doing so had been closed for weeks.

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Writers, editors at Salon move to unionize

Following editorial workers at Gawker Media, editorial staff at Salon is moving to unionize and bargain a first contract with their employer.

They’ve signed on with the Writers Guild of America, East, the same union that recently won a representation election at Gawker Media and is at the start of a process to try to bargain a contract.

“We are doing this because we believe in our publication and want it to be successful,” workers said in a joint statement issued with the union. “We’re especially proud to work for a media organization that has championed progressive values for nearly twenty years.”

“We believe this organizing campaign is a positive and public way for us to put those values into practice, right here at home. Read more

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Trey-yingst-250

College student Trey Yingst skips classes … to report from conflict zones

Trey Yingst in Baltimore late one night during the Freddie Gray riots providing medical assistance to Connor Wolf from The Daily Caller who had been attacked. (Photo courtesy of Trey Yingst)

Trey Yingst in Baltimore late one night during the Freddie Gray riots providing medical assistance to Connor Wolf from The Daily Caller who had been attacked. (Photo courtesy of Trey Yingst)

On a Monday evening this past April, journalist Trey Yingst set foot in a part of Baltimore that he said, “looked like there were no laws.”

Amid the furor and fervor sparked by Freddie Gray’s death, he observed hundreds of people smashing store windows, overturning vehicles, looting, setting fires and fighting with each other and the police.

At first, every time he raised his camera to shoot, rioters swarmed, threatening to attack. The press group he was with was targeted and confronted by angry rioters armed with hammers and 40-ounce bottles. A reporter near him was later punched in the face and a second was hit in the head with a bottle, each requiring on-the-scene medical attention and a hospital trip. Read more

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New book honors sportswriting legend W.C. Heinz

** FILE ** W.C. "Bill" Heinz shows his 1932 Remington typewriter at his home in Bennington, Vt., in this Nov. 7, 2002 file photo. Heinz, an author, sportswriter and war correspondent, used the typewriter in World War II to write about the allied invasion of France. Heinz, a former New York Sun sportswriter and author who witnessed the Normandy invasion on D-Day, covered some of the greatest sports moments of the 1940s and helped write the book MASH,  has died. Heinz died early Wednesday in Bennington, Vt., according to his daughter. He was 93. (AP Photo/Tim Roske, file)

W.C. “Bill” Heinz shows his 1932 Remington typewriter at his home in Bennington, Vt., in this Nov. 7, 2002 file photo. Heinz, an author, sportswriter and war correspondent, used the typewriter in World War II to write about the allied invasion of France. (AP Photo/Tim Roske, file)

The passage of time doesn’t do justice to the greats of sports journalism. Their vast works tend to get forgotten in the new media world, where today and tomorrow seem paramount. Who needs yesterday?

So many thanks to The Library of America and Bill Littlefield for reviving the brilliance of W.C. Heinz in a new book, “The Top of His Game.” Littlefield, the host of NPR’s “Only A Game,” selected the best  columns and stories from one of the best sportswriters of all time. Read more

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Journalists might finally get paid for all those long days

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. But your late-night tweets might not countPresident Barack Obama’s proposal to grant overtime pay to millions of Americans should affect “the many reporters, editors and producers who routinely work long and unpredictable hours for relatively modest pay,” Michael Calderone and Dave Jamieson write for The Huffington Post. But in the case of journalism, the definition of work remains fuzzy. “Tweeting news from one’s couch at 10 p.m. may suggest one is on the clock, but what if one is simultaneously tweeting about a basketball game or awards show? The line between reporting and socializing, on social media and otherwise, easily blurs.” (The Huffington Post) | Related: How poorly are journalists paid? Depends on where you live.
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Career Beat: Clay Fisher named SVP at The New York Times

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Clay Fisher has been named senior vice president of consumer marketing at The New York Times. Previously, he led the digital marketing and media group at DIRECTV. (The New York Times Company)
  • Paul Lewis has been named West Coast bureau chief for Guardian U.S. He is The Guardian’s Washington Correspondent. (‏@PaulLewis)
  • Brendan James will be a media reporter at The International Business Times. He is a newswriter at TPM. (@deep_beige)

Job of the day: The Intercept is looking for a political corruption blogger. Get your résumés in! (The Intercept)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Wednesday, July 01, 2015

The New York Times told people to add peas to guac. People said nope.

On Wednesday, a New York Times food story suggested readers add peas to their guacamole. Here’s the tweet:

But readers refused. Here are some of their tweets:

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5 times journalists should have been listening to BuzzFeed’s podcast ‘Another Round’

Screen shot, Another Round

Screen shot, Another Round


If you’ve listened in to BuzzFeed’s “Another Round With Heben and Tracy,” you might look forward to Tracy Clayton’s super-bad jokes or Heben Nigatu’s live-list reading or that moment near the end of the show when they both sound pretty drunk. For me, one frequent highlight comes when they talk about the media.

Clayton and Nigatu are writers at BuzzFeed and co-hosts of the podcast. Here’s how they described the podcast as it launched:

Another Round is basically happy hour with friends you haven’t met yet. Grab a drink and yell along with your preferred electronic device as we talk about everything from pop culture to squirrels to racism to sexism to male strippers to literally everything.

If you’re a journalist, some of the talk at happy hour includes finding out what’s behind a piece, how a headline was chosen and what it’s really like to cover a story. Read more

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Press can’t see Hulk Hogan sex tape at trial, judge orders

Hulk Hogan is used to performing for a crowd. In his decades-long career as a professional wrestler, his matches drew thousands of spectators. But thanks to a ruling from a Florida judge, the raciest part of his latest contest will receive less public scrutiny.

Circuit Judge Pamela Campbell decided today that reporters and members of the public will not be allowed to view a sex video at the center of a multi-million dollar invasion-of-privacy lawsuit between Hogan and Gawker Media.

The courtroom will not be closed while the evidence is shown, Campbell ruled. Instead, monitors showing the tape will be pointed away from the gallery where the press sits, restricting the tape’s viewability.

The ruling came after a legal back-and-forth between lawyers for Hogan — real name Terry Bollea — and Gawker Media, which alternatively presented cases for Hogan’s right to privacy and the public’s right to an open court. Read more

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This Wichita reporter is covering a massive bee situation

On Wednesday morning, a truck carrying a reported 100,000 bees somehow let those bees loose in a Wichita, Kansas parking lot. KWCH’s Emily Griffin reported live from the scene.

“I’m not even gonna lie, I’m a little too scared to get out of the car right now,” Griffin said on camera. In a video with the story, you can see gray puddles of bees on the ground and a few of those bees flying by.

Screen shot

Screen shot

“We did see a man in a bee suit a little bit down the road, maybe about a block away. It looked like he was talking with a police officer,” Griffin said.

She’s also live-tweeting.

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Memos reveal ideological divide at Bloomberg

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. The old guard clashes with the new

    Memos from Bloomberg Editor-in-Chief John Micklethwait sent to staffers in recent months suggest "a philosophical shift" underway at the New York-based news organization, according to a 2,653-word takeout published by Columbia Journalism Review Tuesday. "To numerous employees CJR interviewed, they read as a coded rebuttal to time-intensive enterprise reporting, and raise a red-flag about the new regime’s commitment to the work they most prized." In the memos, Micklethwait outlines an editorial vision that eschews "self-indulgent" longreads and emphasizes covering big breaking stories. In one memo, Micklethwait urges caution over "'gotcha' journalism," warning reporters that a disrespected PR representative might be unlikely to provide Bloomberg with scoops in the future. (Columbia Journalism Review) | A recent profile in Politico Magazine shed light on the cultural gulf between the older and newer elements of Bloomberg's news operation.

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Questions every writer should ask developers

Photo by corinnepw/Flickr

Photo by corinnepw/Flickr

More than ever before, reporters are learning hybrid skills by using open-source storytelling tools, building data visualizations such as charts and maps, and using HTML and CSS skills to improve Web stories. Editorial teams are working hand-in-hand with developers and their work every day, from using Tweet embeds to fusion tables, and sometimes, within our companies.

To start working with developers, it’s helpful to understand what kinds of work they do. On any team, there can be vague roles that have intersectional duties. This is also true for developers at media companies, whose responsibilities can range from keeping the site running and preparing a plan for DDoS attacks to working with designers on new editorial tools to developing user experience interactions in native ads. Read more

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