It’s Shakespeare’s birthday

The Guardian | Huffington Post | BuzzFeed | BBCThe New York Times | Business Insider


Happy birthday, William Shakespeare. We think, at least, that this is the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth (and also the anniversary of his death.) In honor of the day we think Shakespeare was probably born, then, let's celebrate with some journalistic offerings, and a little of the Bard's own faux-tweets thrown in, too.

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Gannett’s broadcast revenue soars, circulation revenue slips

Gannett | USA Today Revenue from broadcasting in Gannett's first quarter just about doubled over the same period a year earlier, the company announced in an earnings report Wednesday. Gannett attributed the 99.5 percent rise in broadcast revenue to its acquisition of Belo, as well as Winter Olympics, political advertising and retransmission revenue. On a pro-forma basis (making comparisons as if Gannett had acquired Belo's stations at the beginning of last year), retransmission revenue was up 66 percent over the first quarter of 2013. Revenue at Gannett's publishing properties was down 3.3 percent overall for the quarter. Advertising revenue was down about 5 percent worldwide and about 6 percent in the U.S., and circulation revenue fell by 1.4 percent, which the company attributes in part to "lower circulation revenue at local domestic publishing operations." Looking at the company's fourth-quarter results earlier this year, Poynter's Rick Edmonds wrote that squishy circulation figures raised "the concern that capturing revenue from new digital subscribers and pairing 'all access' print/digital bundles with a big price increase could be a one-time revenue event." In a statement accompanying the release, President and CEO Gracia Martore said USA Today's "butterfly edition" in local papers "continues to gain significant traction with subscribers." In a conference call with analysts for fourth-quarter results, Edmonds reported, Martore said the expanded USA Today offering "could provide the rationale for another round of price increases" later this year. Digital revenue was up about 3 percent, mostly due to sales at its CareerBuilder business. Gannett's 120 or so web publishing properties had 67.5 million unique visitors between them, the report says.
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Tuesday, Apr. 22, 2014

Dorian Nakamoto: ‘I’ll keep my bitcoin account’

In a video filmed alongside Andreas M. Antonopoulos, who is writing a book about bitcoin, Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto again says he's not Satoshi Nakamoto, bitcoin's founder. Newsweek last month said he was. "Of course if I was the real creator I would never use my real name," Nakamoto says. He says he received a bitcoin account from Antonopoulos and is "very thankful for you, all these people in U.S., Europe, in Asia, in Africa, in South America who supported me throughout." He says 2,000 people donated. "I'll keep my bitcoin account for many, many years, and hopefully I can also contribute as you did to me," Nakamoto says. Last month, Nakamoto said he'd hired a lawyer and that his "prospects for gainful employment has been harmed because of Newsweek's article." Newsweek issued a statement March 7 saying it stands by its story.
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Boston Globe _AP

Boston Globe explores sale of headquarters

The Boston Globe The Boston Globe will explore a sale of its headquarters, Beth Healy reports. The newspaper's next home will "reflect our culture of excellence and the direction our business is headed over the next few decades," Globe chief executive Mike Sheehan wrote in a memo to employees. He also tells them "don't start packing boxes quite yet." (Memo below.)
The Boston Globe building (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, file)
The Globe's current building includes its printing facilities. Healy says the building may be worth as much as $70 million. John Henry bought the Globe last year for $70 million cash. The Washington Post's former owners agreed last November to sell its building for $159 million. The paper is considering a new home that figures prominently in a Dan Brown novel. Rick Edmonds wrote last year about the logic of selling newspaper buildings. Not only do many such publications have smaller headcounts, they often occupy large parcels of land "particularly attractive to developers, which might otherwise need to assemble a suitable property from several owners." Here's Sheehan's memo: (more...)
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Images from Earth Day 2014

Maybe Earth Day lost a bit of its usual ability to grab headlines because of a late Easter, which also happened to fall on a pot holiday, followed by the 2014 Boston Marathon. Regardless, here are some images Associated Press photographers shot on Earth Day from around the world. Some are lovely, some pretty depressing, and one is just puzzling. Aren't beauty queens already supposed to be about saving the earth?
Kashmiri women row a boat filled with weeds after cleaning the Dal Lake on Earth Day, on the outskirts of Srinagar, India, Tuesday, April 22, 2014. The weed-clogged Dal Lake is central to Kashmir’s tourist trade and efforts are being made to rescue the lake. In the past two decades the lake has shrunk by more than half, according to environmental study reports. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)


A woman walks near an Apple store with the Apple logo partially changed to green to mark Earth Day in Beijing, China, Tuesday, April 22, 2014. A new global initiative timed to coincide with Tuesday's celebration of the annual Earth Day offers free recycling of all its used products and vows to power all of its stores, offices and data centers with renewable energy to reduce the pollution caused by its devices and online services. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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Videojournalists set up outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, April 22, 2104. The court is hearing arguments between Aereo, Inc., an internet startup company that gives subscribers access to broadcast television on their laptops and other portable devices and the broadcasters. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

Aereo ‘cautiously optimistic’ after Supreme Court hearing

Reuters | The Washington Post | Associated Press | CNN | SCOTUSblog | The Verge U.S. Supreme Court Justices Tuesday "gave little sign of support for Aereo during the one-hour oral argument, but the bigger concern appeared to be the possible broader implications of a ruling against the company," Lawrence Hurley reports for Reuters. The court was hearing a challenge by broadcasters to the legality of Aereo, a company that streams and stores for subscribers broadcast programs picked up by a tiny rented antenna. Two previous cases have gone Aereo's way.
Videojournalists outside the Supreme Court on Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)
The justices were concerned what a ruling against Aereo might mean for cloud computing, Cecilia Kang reports: Justice Stephen Breyer "questioned the extent of broadcasters’ interpretation of copyright law, raising the fear that other cloud-based technologies like DropBox could open themselves up to liability for storing copyright content." (more...)
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Kent State journalism faculty ‘embarrassed’ by university’s secretive presidential search

Akron Beacon Journal | The Daily Kent Stater | When Journalism Fails
Faculty members from Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication took out an ad in student paper The Daily Kent Stater Tuesday to protest the university's search for a new president. Officials destroyed documentation of the search, saying it had "turned over all records that are relevant,” Carol Biliczky reported in the Akron Beacon Journal earlier this month.

"We’re embarrassed by our administration’s refusal to disclose public records related to the recent presidential search," the ad reads. "And we’re troubled over credible news reports that some of these records may have been shredded to avoid public inspection." (more...)
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At the marathon, AP’s Bill Kole made lousy time and great tweets

When he runs, Bill Kole usually pulls back from what's happening around him and focuses on his pace.
On Monday, he did the opposite for the Boston Marathon.

"I needed to think about what was going on with the many souls around me," he said in a phone interview with Poynter.

Kole, who's the New England bureau chief for the Associated Press, stopped at each mile to tweet. In each of those tweets was a small story, a scene, a few seconds of what was happening at the Boston Marathon one year after the bombings that killed three people and left more than 260 injured. (more...)
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Figure skaters will be NBC’s fashion experts at Kentucky Derby

The Wrap


Hat fashion experts? Tony Maglio reported in The Wrap on Tuesday that Olympic figure skaters Tara Lipinksi and Johnny Weir will join NBC Sports to offer fashion coverage for the Kentucky Derby.
“Johnny and Tara have an infectious energy that will bring a fun and fresh perspective to our Kentucky Derby and Kentucky Oaks telecasts,” Rob Hyland, coordinating producer for NBC Sports Group, said in a statement. “They will be in their element amid the big-event atmosphere and pageantry of Churchill Downs.”


 

Of course, it's about more than just the hats. The (Louisville, Ky.) Courier-Journal offers this video on fashion tips on the day of "competitive dressing up." (more...)
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Businessweek’s creative director leaves

Richard Turley | FishbowlNY
Richard Turley, the creative director of Bloomberg Businessweek, is leaving the publication for MTV. "[I]t’s time for me to learn something new and work with different content for a different audience," he writes on his Tumblr.

Turley says Businessweek Editor Josh Tyrangiel is "Hands down the best boss and editor I have ever worked for, but also and more importantly - my partner in crime, and someone who deserves far more credit for the design of the magazine than he ever allows himself to receive." Asked by email about a replacement, Bloomberg Businessweek spokesperson Rachel Nagler said, "Richard is amazing. We wish him nothing but the best, and we hope to make an announcement in the near future." Turley came to Businessweek from The Guardian. Under him, the magazine reinvented itself as a visual powerhouse, running bold and often cheeky covers like this one from last summer about hedge-fund managers: In an interview with Katie Myrick last year, Turley noted the magazine produces 50 covers every year: "Out of those fifty, one or two might be considered provocative, and naturally those are the ones that get zero’d in on." He continued:
I hope though, that almost all our covers are considered at least ‘good’. Because that is the primary aim, despite what you may read or think about me.
Earlier this year, Bloomberg Media Group CEO Justin B. Smith said the company planned to follow Businessweek's design innovations and apply "a similar design standard to all of our media platforms."
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Knight’s Prototype Fund fuels 17 projects

Knight Foundation
On Tuesday, the Knight Foundation announced the funding of 17 projects through Prototype Fund grants, Chris Barr writes.
The Prototype Fund is designed to give people with great concepts for media and information projects grants of $35,000 and six months to take their idea all the way to demo with a class of others facing a similar challenge. What can you learn in six months? Quite a bit.
Projects in this round include Capitol Hound, "Offering the public a searchable database of the transcripts of North Carolina legislative sessions, including an audio archive and alert system for General Assembly sessions and committee meetings"; Minezy, "Creating a tool to help journalists more easily find information in email archives received through Freedom of Information Act requests by analyzing data and highlighting important social relationships, dates and topics"; and Tipsy, "Making it easier for content providers to generate revenue by developing a new way to fund news sites through micropayments from readers."

For more information on each of the 17 projects, check out Knight's announcement.
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MediaWireWorld: Anchor shot in Pakistan, Greste trial continues in Egypt

Posts on MediaWire tend to focus on what's happening with journalists in the U.S., but every day I see headlines about what's happening with journalists around the world. That news is often disturbing, sometimes encouraging and, if it involves Rob Ford, probably kind of funny. Today I'm starting a daily post of links with news about journalists and journalism outside the U.S. If you come across something I've missed, please pass it along to me through Twitter, @kristenhare, or email, khare@poynter.org.
Egypt

On Tuesday, Mohamed Lotfy reported in The Guardian that Australian journalist Peter Greste goes back on trial in Cairo today. Greste and two of his Al Jazeera colleagues, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed, face terrorism charges. According to The Guardian, Lotfy is observing the trial on behalf of Amnesty International. He wrote:
The continued detention of Greste sends a message to all journalists working in Egypt: “no one is safe”. By imprisoning a foreign Australian journalist, the Egyptian authorities can warn local and international reporters they will be monitoring news reporting and will stifle anything they perceive as dissent.


Pakistan On Sunday, Committee to Protect Journalists reported that Geo News senior anchor Hamid Mir was shot.
Mir is reported to be in serious condition with wounds to his abdomen and pelvis, but is expected to survive. On March 28, gunmen sprayed the car of TV anchor and analyst Raza Rumi, a member of the Express Group of media organizations. He escaped serious injury, but his driver, Mustafa, was killed. Earlier in March, Sharif pledged to a visiting CPJ delegation to take several steps to improve journalist security.
Bulgaria Not sure if this is the making of a Bulgarian selfie or if the people pictured are taking a photo of the object in front of them (I think it's the latter.) Still, this is a nice image on the front of DUMA, from Sofia, Bulgaria.
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stephen-buckley

‪Stephen Buckley will leave Poynter‬

Poynter Dean of Faculty Stephen Buckley will leave the Institute in June to move to Zambia, where he will work for the nongovernmental organization Family Legacy developing a new youth leadership center. Poynter President Tim Franklin said Buckley will be sorely missed for his leadership of the faculty. (more...)
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OC Register strikes content-sharing deal with news nonprofit

OC Weekly | Voice of OC The Orange County Register has formed a content-sharing deal with the news nonprofit Voice of OC, OC Weekly Editor Gustavo Arellano reported Monday. Reached by email Monday, Voice of OC Editor-in-Chief Norberto Santana Jr. said Arellano's account was "accurate... About our syndication deal with OCR." Arellano torched the deal, saying Voice of OC "just sold out any indie cred it had built up by becoming [Register owner Aaron] Kushner's useful idiot."
But the only winner in all this is Kushner. The Voice of OC loses by entering into an agreement with their competitor, a competitor they have wonderfully exposed as a hater of journalism ethics in the past--wish I could be the fly in the wall in Kushner's office next time the Voice of OC ever do a story like that, if they ever bother with that beat again. Register readers lose out by allowing Kushner to pass off sloppy seconds to them, all the while as he insists he's giving them a superior product...by using a competitor. The Reg newsroom loses out, as this syndication deal amounts to a vote of no confidence by Kushner and Curley, and an indication that any future hires won't go to the investigations team--so much for any commitment to actual hard news!
Santana writes that the Register will "run our stories on local government, basically akin to a wire service agreement." Voice of OC will "get monetization for stories they run, and obviously increase our reach into Orange County ensuring that the community gets solid coverage of municipal affairs from a non-profit newsroom just focused on city hall coverage." It will assign its own stories, Santana writes, and the Register has the choice of running them. He continues: (more...)
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NYT launches ‘The Upshot,’ its data-driven news-explainer thing

The New York Times Company | The Upshot
The Upshot, a new data-driven New York Times publication, launched Tuesday. It aims to help readers "better navigate the news," the Times says in a press release. The site "will focus on politics, policy and economics, with a particular emphasis on the 2014 elections, the state of the economy, economic mobility and health care."

Its staff believes "many people don’t understand the news as well as they would like," Upshot Editor David Leonhardt writes in a welcome note, and those people would like to be able to "explain the whys and hows of those stories to their friends, relatives and colleagues."

The Upshot will rely on data to "illuminate and explain the news," Leonhardt writes, and its first-day stories include a model that projects Democrats' chances to keep control of the U.S. Senate and another that says the United States' middle class is now less wealthy than Canada's.

The Upshot joins a suddenly bustling market of publications that hope to bring context to the news, including Vox ("explaining the news") and FiveThirtyEight ("we hope to contribute to your understanding of the news in a variety of ways").

Previously: NYT names new D.C. bureau chief, plans two ‘newsroom start ups’ | NYT’s Leonhardt: The Upshot staff will ‘serve as navigators for the news’
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