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Front pages from Hong Kong’s ‘Umbrella Revolution’

Protests continue in Hong Kong, and newspapers in the region and around the world led with images of thousands in the streets on Tuesday. Here are a few of them, via Newseum and Kisoko.net. (I’ve also started a Twitter list of journalists covering the protests in Hong Kong. Email me or tweet me and let me know who I’m missing.)… Read more

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Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will “turbo-charge traffic growth” to Move’s properties, and it will “benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move “reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue.” (NYT)
  2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may “approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.” Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: “The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy.” (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person.
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CHACO CANYON

100 hours: How one L.A. Times reporter binge-watched his way through an investigation

When Joe Mozingo came back from the Salt Lake City in September 2012, he had a lot of TV to watch. Mozingo, a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, had been on assignment investigating an FBI sting when when a source gave him a cache of discs that contained more than 100 hours of undercover footage.

Taken together, they told the story of Ted Gardiner, an FBI informant who’d killed himself after helping expose an underground trade in illicit artifacts stolen from Anasazi land in Utah. The footage showed clandestine meetings between Gardiner and would-be criminals that eventually became the foundation of a six-chapter multimedia investigation loaded with original footage and actualities.

Gardiner. (Screenshot from Los Angeles Times via Gardiner family)

But before it became a story, it was just a box filled with discs.… Read more

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P-World Series TV

Today in media history: The first televised World Series game

73,365 fans filled Yankee Stadium on September 30, 1947 to watch game one of the World Series between the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers. Millions of people around the world listened to their radios as announcers Red Barber and Mel Allen called the game.

And for those lucky enough to have a TV, which were still hard to find in 1947, they could watch the first World Series game ever broadcast on television. Bob Stanton served as the NBC TV announcer. The Yankees beat the Dodgers 5-3.

Mel Allen and Red Barber remember the 1947 World Series:

In 2012 Philly.com posted a story about the first televised World Series game.

“For the first time, the World Series, America’s preeminent sporting
event, was being televised, and Philadelphians, as curious about the
new technology as the baseball, bunched around 7- and 10-inch screens
for a peek.

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Monday, Sep. 29, 2014

NYT makes another change in response to Innovation Report

The New York Times has promoted Tony Brancato to executive director of Web products and audience development as part of an ongoing effort to “make the Innovation Report a reality,” according to a memo from The Times.

“A central recommendation of the team was to name leads in the newsroom and in product to oversee our audience-building efforts,” Denise Warren, executive vice president of the Times’ digital products services group, and Paul Smurl, general manager of the Times’ core digital products, write in the memo, which is below. “Dean’s and Andy’s recent promotion of Alex MacCallum was the first step. And Tony’s is the second.”

In August, Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet appointed MacCallum assistant editor for outreach, a masthead position created to address the Times’ need to reach a broader audience.… Read more

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In honor of National Coffee Day, here are some mug shots

It’s National Coffee Day for a bit longer, and earlier on Monday I asked readers to share photos of their favorite coffee mugs on Twitter. Here’s what they sent:

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Newsweek places editor’s note over Zakaria archives

This editor’s note now sits on Newsweek’s author page for Fareed Zakaria:

Fareed Zakaria worked for Newsweek when it was under previous ownership. Readers are advised that some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others. In addition, readers with information about articles by Mr. Zakaria that may purportedly lack proper attribution are asked to e-mail Newsweek at corrections@newsweek.com

Zakaria’s last story for Newsweek was published in September 2010, according to the archive. (The note is on that story, and others in the archive, as well.) IAC/Interactive sold Newsweek to the owners of the International Business Times last year.

Two anonymous online critics, @blippoblappo and @crushingbort, have peppered Zakaria with plagiarism charges, including some regarding his time at Newsweek.… Read more

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How to build a news apps team (Hint: if you don’t have a lot of money, settle for scrappy)

It isn’t really a question of whether you need a news apps team or not. The question for most newsrooms is what kind of news apps team can you afford? And then, how can you keep them as long as possible, given your scarce resources?

Programmers and developers with journalistic inclinations are in high demand. They command good salaries and they tend to want to live in places where there is a vibrant tech industry.

That means big newsrooms with big budgets in big cities have a distinct advantage. So smaller newsrooms with smaller budgets must be realistic and strategic.

Emily Ramshaw, editor of the Texas Tribune, and Jonathan Keegan, director of interactive graphics at the Wall Street Journal, offered up tips and strategies this past weekend at ONA14 for building the best news apps team possible.Read more

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The interns want to learn more about video

Dow Jones News Fund

The Dow Jones News Fund surveyed people who went through its internship program and asked what skills in a digital workshop they’d like to have devoted more time to. They overwhelmingly chose video (in varying numbers, they also picked coding and photography).

Asked what they’d like to spend less time on, most said “Nothing.” But the skills they did mention aren’t easily grouped: copy-editing, local reporting and grammar make that list, but so do learning about WordPress and data visualization.

The fund provides paid internships at news organizations — 86 interns at 55 outlets this summer, a Dow Jones spokesperson tells Poynter.

The survey also asked alums about their current salary. 30 percent said they made less than $25,000. 54 percent said they made less than $45K.… Read more

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Who’s covering protests in Hong Kong?

If you want to follow news of the protests in Hong Kong, I’ve made a Twitter list (currently 107 and growing) of journalists covering the story from Hong Kong.

Who am I missing? Email me at khare@poynter.org, or tweet at me @kristenhare, and I’ll add them to the list. There are a lot of hashtags, at this point, to search as well. They include: #hk, #HongKong, #OccupyCentral #OccupyHK, #UmbrellaMovement and #UmbrellaRevolution.

A few other great lists to check out, which helped me build this one, come from Andrew Peng and Joe Weisenthal. Peng, an editor and journalist with Reason Squared (and the owner of a pretty great Twitter handle) created this list: Hong Kong Protests, which gathers journalists and protesters.… Read more

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The Economist clarifies: It does not consider Narendra Modi a ‘pain in the ass’

A good editor’s note hitchhikes on the bottom of a column about Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to New York:

Editor’s note: The second sentence of this blog post was changed on September 29th to make clear that The Economist does not consider Mr Modi to be a “pain in the ass”; that epithet is merely how we imagined an uninformed New Yorker might feel about someone who causes a traffic jam.

Modi at Madison Square Garden on Sunday. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

Earlier this month, The Economist withdrew a book review that appeared to defend slave owners. It kept the review online “in the interests of transparency,” something famous corrections blogger Craig Silverman applauded:

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Ferguson gouges journalists on public records requests

Associated Press

The city of Ferguson, Missouri, demands high fees to retrieve documents in the wake of Michael Brown’s shooting last month. “Organizations like the website Buzzfeed were told they’d have to pay unspecified thousands of dollars for emails and memos about Ferguson’s traffic-citation policies and changes to local elections,” Jack Gillum reports. “The Washington Post said Ferguson wanted no less than $200 for its requests.”

Related: 4 types of FOIAs and how to use them for your reporting | FOIA lessons from Gawker Editor John Cook

Gillum says the city “wanted nearly $2,000 to pay a consulting firm for up to 16 hours of work to retrieve messages on its own email system” when AP “asked for copies of several police officials’ emails and text messages.” Technicians might have to look at tape backups, the consulting firm told Gillum.… Read more

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Ben Bradlee

Ben Bradlee is receiving hospice care

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ESPN asks dudes to address domestic violence: A two-hour pregame show preceding Monday Night Football will feature, among other things, a panel discussion featuring 11 men, Ben Collins reports. “When the show has updates from the field—brief reports about injuries and the upcoming game—they’ll cut to female sideline reporters, Lisa Salters and, on some weeks, Suzy Kolber. ¶ These people are not allowed at the table.” (Esquire) | UPDATE, 12:39 P.M.: ESPN says no such panel is planned. (Deadspin)
  2. Ben Bradlee is getting hospice care: The former Washington Post editor has dementia, his wife, Sally Quinn, said in a C-SPAN interview broadcast Sunday. (Politico) | “[O]ver time, his condition became more difficult to manage.” (WP)
  3. Reporting is dangerous: Indian journalist Rajdeep Sardesai was harassed outside Madison Square Garden Sunday, when Prime Minister Narendra Modi spoke.
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P-Lowell Thomas

Today in media history: In 1930 Lowell Thomas broadcast the first CBS radio daily newscast

On September 29, 1930, broadcaster Lowell Thomas hosted the first CBS radio daily news program. He worked for both CBS and NBC during his long broadcast career. His radio program, “Lowell Thomas and the News,” usually ended with the words “…and so long until tomorrow.”

This was not the first daily radio network news program. NBC radio’s Red Network broadcast the first program on February 24, 1930. Floyd Gibbons, one of the best known newspaper correspondents at the beginning of the 20th century, was the announcer.

The last regular edition of “Lowell Thomas and the News” aired at 7 p.m. on Friday, May 14, 1976.

Before Thomas became a radio commentator, he was a travel adventure writer best known for his stories about Lawrence of Arabia.… Read more

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Sunday, Sep. 28, 2014

NYT corrects: Wookiee has two ‘e’s

An important note rides below Brooks Barnes’ story about “Star Wars Rebels.”

Correction: September 25, 2014
An earlier version of this article misspelled the name of a creature in the “Star Wars” universe. It is a wookiee, not a wookie.

Last April the Tampa Bay Times, which Poynter owns, wrote a very good correction about a “Star Wars” mistake. … Read more

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