Boston Globe Future

Boston Globe to offer voluntary buyouts

The Boston Globe will offer voluntary buyouts to an unspecified number of employees in the next few days, according to emails obtained by Poynter.

“There’s no set number we’re trying to achieve. Most significantly, it’s not meant as a cost-cutting exercise in the newsroom. In fact, when all is said and done, I don’t expect staffing levels here to change much, if at all,” Globe Editor Brian McGrory wrote.

It is the first round of layoffs since the paper came under the ownership of Boston Red Sox owner John Henry in October 2013, according to the Boston Business Journal.

The last round of layoffs at the Globe happened in July 2012 when 10 people were laid off and 43 employees — including 20 in the newsroom — were offered buyouts.… Read more

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tapeacall

Apps that record phone calls are convenient, but can present confidentiality risks

Reporters frequently cite mobile apps that record phone calls as among their favorites, according to David Ho, The Wall Street Journal’s editor for Mobile, Tablets & Emerging Technology, who has trained some 1,500 journalists on how to use tech tools in their work.

But reporters might not realize that these apps often store the recordings of calls on their own servers or the cloud – and then send a copy to the user’s cell phone. This means third parties can access the information, which raises questions about who owns the recording and whether communications with sources are confidential.

“Once information gets into a third party’s hands, there is a risk that your protections could be minimized as a result,” said Bruce Johnson, a media attorney at Davis Wright Tremaine in Seattle.… Read more

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nprone2

NPR One app potential is huge

Public radio and podcasts have taken on an increasing role in my life. I listen while running, cleaning, cooking, driving long distances or taking public transportation, mostly times when I can afford to multitask, but can’t be looking at video or don’t want the added work of reading text.

I downloaded the NPR One app this week and listened to it twice during long morning jogs, and while I was riding public transportation and hanging out in airports. I’ll stop short of calling it a game-changer. But it’s clear that this app, or one like it, has the potential to become a content platform for news and culture audio, the way Amazon is for shopping or Netflix is for movies.

NPR One is like Pandora for public radio content.… Read more

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Join 3-time Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter for a master class

In February, David Barstow came to Poynter for an event featuring Pulitzer winners from the year before. Each spoke about their work and the impact that work had.

Barstow, a reporter with The New York Times, spoke about his Pulitzer-winning piece on Wal-Mart corruption in both Mexico and the U.S. During that talk and in an interview after, Barstow talked about trail magic.

It’s a term that comes from hiking the Appalachian Trail, he said, when you run out of supplies or get lost and someone comes along with the thing that you need. “And I kind of think that same philosophy applies to journalism.”

Something happens, as you’re reporting, when the right stuff comes along (after lots of door knocking and question asking.)

Barstow called it trail magic.

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Vladimir Putin

Russian ‘law on bloggers’ takes effect today

Hello there. Sorry this isn’t Beaujon. Here are 10 or so media stories. Happy Friday!

  1. Russian blogger law goes into effect: It could crack down on free expression, Alec Luhn explains: “Popularly known as the ‘law on bloggers,’ the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested.” (The Guardian) | “Registered bloggers have to disclose their true identity, avoid hate speech, ‘extremist calls’ and even obscene language.” (Gigaom) | The law also states that “social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.” (BBC News)
  2. More on David Frum non-faked photo fakery saga: Photo fakery surely occurs in places like Gaza, James Fallows writes.
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ch13investigates100

Local TV Stations Investigate Football Helmet Safety: Get Results

One of the benefits of my job is that as I travel around the country working with TV stations, I see story ideas that spread like kudzu from one market to the next. One station in one city finds some success with the story, others hear about it, copy the idea and localize it.  I find most of these cut and paste ideas pop up around “sweeps” months and most are awful.  Here’s one that isn’t.  It is worth looking at where you are and it may keep some kid from getting hurt.

In May, WDIV in Detroit began investigating high school football helmet safety. The station found that local high schools routinely issued players helmets that helmet safety experts said didn’t provide enough protection.

They used information from a rating system developed at Virginia Tech that assesses the safety of different football helmets.… Read more

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media-history

Today in media history: Woodward & Bernstein make Watergate link

Four events that happened on this date and a trivia question.

August 1, 1970
The NBC Nightly News with David Brinkley, John Chancellor and Frank McGee began on this date in 1970. Prior to this date, the program was anchored by Brinkley and Chet Huntley. About a year later John Chancellor became the sole news anchor. (The following video is from July 4, 1972.)

August 1, 1972
Washington Post reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward link the Watergate burglary to President Nixon’s campaign funds. (See Also: The Woodward and Bernstein Watergate Papers.)

August 1, 2006
The Miami newspaper, El Nuevo Herald, reports that Cuban leader Fidel Castro ceded power to his brother.

(Newseum Image)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 1, 2006
Pulitzer Prize winning story published:
Dark Tides, Ill Winds
Explanatory Reporting Category (2007)
“Awarded to Kenneth R.Read more

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Thursday, July 31, 2014

3 ways to prevent your apology from becoming the story

On Wednesday, The Atlantic’s David Frum apologized after accusing The New York Times and other news organizations of faking photos at a Gaza hospital. And then he kept talking. So now we have more stories.

Here are three tips on how to apologize so that your apology doesn’t become the story. Study them, and you may be able to shut down some bad press.

1. Do it. Then hush.

In 2012, Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon wrote “How journalists bungle apologies: They keep talking.”

Here is how you apologize: “I’m sorry.” Maybe “We’re sorry.” If your apology includes the words “if,” “but,” or especially “however” it is not an apology. It’s a justification, which is not the same thing.

I’m adding “also” to the list.

Frum started this on Twitter.… Read more

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breakup rope  on big dollar background

Splitsville: Why newspapers and TV are going their separate ways corporately

Like the sale of the Washington Post this time last year, the merger of E.W. Scripps and Journal Communications, announced last night, and their reorganization into separate print and broadcast companies came as a jaw-dropping surprise.

But the morning after, the complicated transaction makes perfect sense.

  • Local broadcasting is seeing a wave of consolidations. The business is healthy, and getting bigger provides station groups more leverage negotiating retransmission fees with cable providers. That has become a significant new source of revenue growth as political and automotive advertising remain strong.
  • Financially squeezed newspapers drag down the share price of companies with prospering TV, cable and digital divisions. The spinoff of Tribune Publishing scheduled next week and the division of News Corp a year ago give the remaining parent television and entertainment companies investment wind at their back.
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Tumblr page shows how much news orgs pay photographers

PetaPixel | Who Pays Photographers?

“Who Pays Photographers?” is a Tumblr that takes anonymous submissions about who pays how much to photojournalists.

On Wednesday, Gannon Burgett wrote about the page for PetaPixel.

As photographers, one of the most difficult aspects of using it as a form of income is determining what is and isn’t deemed appropriate compensation for our work.

An almost taboo topic amongst photographers and even more so amongst editorial clients, the talk of pay is one that rarely gets brought to the front-lines. Ultimately, this leaves those looking to get into editorial gigs have a much larger barrier to entry, as less information is known by both parties.

The page credits the Tumblr page “Who Pays Writers” for the inspiration. Submissions include the Wall Street Journal, the Associated Press and Texas A&M’s university newspaper, The Battalion.… Read more

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Lede of the day (it involves Rob Ford, deadmau5 and espresso)

Associated Press

Associated Press reporter Rob Gillies wrote a story about Toronto Mayor Rob Ford ordering five espressos, and its lede is phenomenal:

TORONTO (AP) – Famed DJ deadmau5 asked Rob Ford to go for a coffee run in his Ferrari and was jolted by the Toronto mayor’s order: five espressos in one cup.

But the last three lines of the story are remarkable as well.

Ford asks the teller twice if there’s five shots and later says he throws the “espressos back. I do.”

Ford admitted last year that he had smoked crack in a “drunken stupor.”

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LAURA

Future of Homicide Watch D.C. uncertain as Amico joins Boston Globe

In 2012, Laura Amico got a call that changed a lot of things — her city, her work and, eventually, her future

Amico, who lived and worked in Washington, D.C., had been selected to be a Nieman-Berkman fellow at Harvard University, where she would research how the Web could be applied to criminal justice journalism. She was eager to go, but she knew moving to Cambridge for a year would mean leaving behind Homicide Watch, a project she and her husband Chris Amico created together to catalog every single homicide in the D.C. area. She didn’t want the site to wither.

“This thing that I’d built from nothing really had a place in the community,” Amico said.

Laura Amico (submitted photo)

She and her husband — who eventually made the move to Cambridge permanent — raised more than $47,000 on Kickstarter and were able to hire student journalists to keep the site running in their absence.… Read more

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New York Times Slim

NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia

Good morning. 10-ish, anyone?

  1. NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia: Part of a July 25 column “used specific language and details from a Wikipedia article without attribution; it should not have been published in that form,” a grisly editor’s note reads. (NYT) | Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Ravi Somaiya “editors have dealt with Carol on the issue.” (NYT) | “It seems to me that there can be little dispute about the claim,” Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote Wednesday. “Anyone can see the similarity.” (NYT)
  2. E.W. Scripps Co. and Journal Communications will combine broadcast properties, spin off newspapers: The companies “are so similar and share the deep commitment to public service through enterprise journalism,” Scripps Chairman Richard A.
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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Scripps, Journal Communications will combine broadcast groups, spin off newspapers

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel | Scripps

E.W. Scripps Co. and Journal Communications announced an agreement Wednesday night to combine their broadcast assets and turn their newspapers into a separate company, Bill Glauber reports in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Among the 15 newspapers that the new Journal Media Group will hold: The (Memphis, Tennessee) Commercial Appeal, the Knoxville (Tennessee) News Sentinel and the Kitsap Sun of Bremerton, Washington. All of those were previously owned by Scripps; the Journal Sentinel is Journal Communications’ biggest paper.

With 35 stations, Scripps will become the fifth-largest independent TV group in the country after the deal goes through. It also picks up Journal Communications’ 34 radio stations.

“It is no surprise that Scripps would want to move its broadcasting and digital properties from the print holdings just as it moved its considerable cable holdings some time ago,” Poynter’s Al Tompkins said in an email.… Read more

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Guards at empty prison threaten news crew with arrest

WNYT | Albany Times Union

A TV news crew with WNYT in Albany, New York, was threatened with arrest while filming a piece about Grant Cottage on Mount McGregor, WNYT reported last Thursday. While filming outside the nearly closed Mount McGregor Correctional Facility in Wilton, New York, Mark Mulholland and Matt Soriano were stopped by a correctional officer and told to stop filming.

The two told him they were doing a piece on Grant Cottage, a state historic site.

“No filming,” said the officer, who identified himself as Lt. Dorn.
“We’re doing a story on Grant’s Cottage,” Mulholland tried to explain.
“It doesn’t matter,” the officer continued. After a few more exchanges he then said, “You’re going to leave the mountain now.”

Police eventually arrived after an odd scene that includes another correctional employee blocking the entrance to the state historic site and then driving really slowly in front of the two journalists.… Read more

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