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McClatchy reports precipitous print ad declines again for second quarter

McClatchy, in the doghouse with investors for most of the year, reported another disappointing quarter today, eking out a profit of $98,000 on $262 million in revenues.

Despite growing digital ad revenues, holding circulation revenues even and reducing debt and interest payments compared to the same quarter a year ago, the results were dragged down by a 12.5 percent decline in total advertising revenues.

McClatchy is first among the public newspapers to report for the second quarter so drops of nearly the same magnitude seem likely at other companies.  As Gannett (which will report Wednesday) indicated as it spun off to a separate newspaper company a month ago, second quarter ad revenues have been weak there as well.

McClatchy said print advertising declines for the quarter were 16.3 percent. Read more

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Fact checking is on the rise, but there are many challenges

Fact checkers from around the world gathered  July 23 and 24 at City University London to discuss the issues and challenges around their craft. (Photo courtesy of Bill Adair)

Fact checkers from around the world gathered July 23 and 24 at City University London to discuss the issues and challenges around their craft. (Photo courtesy of Bill Adair)

The rise in numbers of fact checking sites around the world – from 44 to 64 in one year – sends a message for accountability journalism. Fact checking veterans and funders of newborn sites, met in London on July 23 and 24 for the second Global Fact-Checking Summit. Lots of lessons emerged, along with advice on how to move forward. But there are unanswered questions to be debated.

On whether to have a rating meter or not

Rating meters became the recognizable stamp for some fact checking sites, as the Washington Post’s Pinocchios or the Pants on Fire from PolitiFact’s Truth-O-Meter can testify. Read more

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Chicago Tribune used an illustrated narrative to revisit a 100-year-old disaster

Rick Tuma's sketchbook. (Submitted photo)

Rick Tuma’s sketchbook. (Submitted photo)

On Wednesday, the Chicago Tribune published “Eastland Disaster,” a nonfiction illustrated narrative reconstructing a July 24, 1915 disaster that killed hundreds in Chicago. The project comes from graphics producers Rick Tuma and Ryan Marx. Via email, Tuma answered some questions about the project, the medium and what he discovered from 100-year-old newspapers.

Rick Tuma (Illustration by Rick Tuma)

Rick Tuma (Illustration by Rick Tuma)

To start, I saw this project was called a “nonfiction illustrated narrative.” I’ve also seen the terms graphic journalism and comics journalism. Is there any consensus on what we should call projects like this?

This is actually my second project. The first — “Harsh Treatment” — published late in 2014. As we were wrapping up, discussions were going on behind the scenes regarding what to call this style of journalism. Read more

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New York Times appends correction to altered Hillary Clinton story

The New York Times

The New York Times has corrected an exclusive story about a Justice Department inquiry into Hillary Clinton’s personal email account:

Correction: July 24, 2015
An earlier version of this article and an earlier headline, ​using information from senior government officials, misstated the nature of the referral to the Justice Department regarding Hillary Clinton’s personal email account while she was secretary of state. The referral addressed the potential compromise of classified information in connection with that personal email account. It did not specifically request an investigation into Mrs. Clinton.

The Times told The Washington Post’s Erik Wemple earlier today that the story did not need to be corrected because it contained no factual errors:

In an e-mail to the Erik Wemple Blog, New York Times spokeswoman Eileen Murphy notes, “As often happens, editors continued to revise this story after initial publication to make it as clear and precise as possible.

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Newspaper apologizes for racist Confederate flag ad

The Roanoke Times

The (Lexington, Virginia) News-Gazette has apologized after a surge of reader criticism after running a prejudicial ad that makes vague reference to controversy stirred up by the “black race” in connection with the Confederate flag.

The ad, which was purchased by area man Raymond Agnor this month to espouse his views on a number of tangentially related topics, has prompted readers to draw up a petition calling on the paper to apologize.

“About the confederate flag,” the ad reads. “Because of all the trouble the democrats and black race are causing, I place this ad. No black people or democrats are allowed on my property until further notice.”

The ad then veers abruptly into concerns about the national debt, social security and taxes. Read more

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Commentary: Front pages still matter

Part of my morning routine is to look for front pages. I check Newseum. I check Kiosko. I check the Twitter and Facebook feeds of places where news is happening, such as Kenya on Friday.

Newspapers have had a tough time for awhile now, but when something big happens, we still share their front pages digitally. I saw them everywhere after Michael Brown was killed in Ferguson almost one year ago, after the murders at Charlie Hebdo in Paris in January and after the Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling last month. The (Charleston, South Carolina) Post and Courier’s Sunday front page after nine people were murdered was so powerful. So is the art that the (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Sentinel and Enterprise has published since an artist took over its front page for 26 days. Read more

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6 tips for covering people with disabilities

Andrea Dalzell, 2015 Ms. Wheelchair New York, participates in the inaugural Disability Pride Parade, Sunday, July 12 in New York.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Andrea Dalzell, 2015 Ms. Wheelchair New York, participates in the inaugural Disability Pride Parade, Sunday, July 12 in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Like many reporters who end up covering disability issues, it’s not my beat. But I’ve made my share of mistakes­­ and seen enough of the mistakes other journalists make to be able to come up with this list of some basic mistakes to avoid, and links to other sources if you want to dig in deeper.

Talk to people with disabilities.This seems simple and almost absurd to mention. But I’ve seen plenty of stories include quotes from social service providers, academics and politicians and leave out people with disabilities. A mantra in the disability community is “nothing about us, without us.” Keep that in mind when reporting. Read more

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Poynter to launch international fact checking site

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Kristin Roberts named national editor at Politico

Kristin Roberts, managing editor at National Journal, will join Politico as the newsroom’s national editor, according to a memo from Politico editor Susan Glasser.

Roberts’ told National Journal staffers she would be leaving the newsroom last week after Atlantic Media Chairman David Bradley announced he was suspending publication of the magazine and focusing on digital efforts in response to the frenetic pace of Washington, D.C. political news. Several National Journal staffers recently decamped to The Atlantic, a title under the Atlantic Media umbrella.

In a statement to Poynter, National Journal spokesperson Jeff Cartwright said the new appointments at The Atlantic are unconnected to the suspension of National Journal’s magazine and have been in the works for at least a month.

The news was reported first by Politico’s Mike Allen. Read more

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Front pages in Kenya welcome President Obama

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eastafrican

Newspapers, radio and television stations across Kenya led with a welcome to President Obama on Friday, including Taifa Leo and The East African on the right. The BBC’s Janet Onyango shared images of the coverage. In Nairobi, journalist Rachel Jones Instagrammed images of many Friday fronts.

On Thursday, Poynter’s Ben Mullin wrote about why Kenyans are mad at CNN after the network called the country a terror hotbed. That led to the hashtag #somebodytellCNN. The same hashtag was used two years ago by Kenyans, journalist Nanjala Nyabola wrote for Al Jazeera at the time.

Also on Thursday, Committee to Protect Journalists’ Sue Valentine wrote about the president’s visit to Kenya and asked “Will Obama’s visit boost hopes for press freedom in Kenya?”

Here’s a small collection of fronts from Kenya I found through the sites, Twitter and Facebook accounts of these newspapers. Read more

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The traumatic effects reporting on tragedy can have on journalists

 Images & Voices of Hope's Judy Rodgers and Veronica (Waddy) McHugh  (Photo by Kenny Irby)

Images & Voices of Hope’s Judy Rodgers and Veronica (Waddy) McHugh (Photo by Kenny Irby)

I recently spent three days with a collection of media professionals who had come together to focus on the topic of ‘restorative narrative’. The gathering was sponsored by Images and Voices of Hope an organization promoting the concept of restorative narrative as a more complete way for journalists and others in the storytelling business to tell the tales of individuals and communities impacted by tragedy.

The group consisted of newspaper, magazine, television and radio reporters, filmmakers, photojournalists, video game designers, and artists. As a psychologist who has specialized in trauma for 25 years, my entire professional career, I was intrigued to find that such an organization existed and welcomed the opportunity to speak with this group which is so often scorned by trauma victims. Read more

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Germans upended by Japanese blitzkrieg in sale of Brits’ Financial Times

Good morning.

  1. Auf Wiedersehen to Axel Springer in Nikkei’s dramatic last-hour scoop

    It was a cloak-and-dagger media battle royal. Bloomberg, Thomson Reuters and Axel Springer were all rumored to be in the running to buy Pearson's Financial Times. Axel Springer was so close to a purchase that heretofore unmentioned Nikkei's head-turning announcement in an email to its own subscribers wound up "stunning FT journalists who'd already begun to joke via Twitter about practicing their German." Nikkei had swooped in at the last moment and jacked up the price by more than $100 million, to $1.3 billion, according to "off-the-record conversations with people involved in the sale." (Bloomberg)

    Stop and consider: Jeff Bezos paid a mere $250 million for the Washington Post and the New York Times Co.

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Career Beat: Sam Dolnick named Associate Editor at The New York Times

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Sam Dolnick is now Associate Editor at The New York Times. Previously, he was a senior editor there. (Capital New York)
  • Peter Bhatia is now editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer. He is director of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism. (Poynter)
  • Krishnadev Calamur is now a senior editor at The Atlantic. Previously, he was a writer at NPR. Marina Koren will be a senior associate editor at The Atlantic. Previously, she was news editor for NationalJournal.com. Ed Yong will be a staff writer at The Atlantic. Previously, he was a freelance science writer. Priscilla Alvarez will be an assistant editor at The Atlantic. Previously, she was a fellow at National Journal.
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Thursday, July 23, 2015

CNN calls Kenya ‘hotbed of terror,’ sparks #SomeoneTellCNN

CNN on Thursday backed away from a claim that President Obama’s forthcoming trip to Kenya will take him into the heart of a “hotbed of terror,” modifying the headline and lede of a story after enduring an onslaught of criticism on Twitter.

Rallying behind the hashtag #SomeoneTellCNN, Twitter users critical of a CNN report examining possible dangers related to the commander-in-chief’s upcoming jaunt to Kenya demanded an apology and castigated the network for perceived lack of awareness of threats in the region. The story, written by CNN Pentagon Correspondent Barbara Starr, explains that the U.S. has conducted “half a dozen secret air strikes” in the neighboring country of Somalia in advance of Obama’s visit to blunt potential attacks against Kenyan troops.

But many readers objected to a characterization in the original headline and lede calling Kenya itself a center of terrorist activity. Read more

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Trump towers, thanks (in part) to the media

Donald Trump (AP Photo)

Donald Trump (AP Photo)

It’s all Donald, all the time, but what’s it tell us about media and the presidential campaign?

Perhaps a whole lot less than all the hand wringing suggests, including the Huffington Post declaring it will consign coverage of his campaign to its Entertainment section.

Trump seemed omnipresent again Thursday as his trek to the Mexico border beckoned and coverage extended well beyond the echo chamber of Washington-New York political reporters.

Indeed, WGN-TV, a heartland bastion in Chicago, gave ample coverage to Trump on its No. 1-rated morning news show for 18-49 and 25-54-year-olds (it well outpaces NBC’s “Today” and ABC’s “Good Morning America” in the Chicago market). That included running video of Sen. Lindsey Graham humorously destroying his phone after Trump gave out the number and having a graying media-politics pundit (me) discoursing on set. Read more

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