Why AP isn’t moving stories for every suspected Ebola case

On Friday, the Associated Press posted an advisory to editors about suspected cases of Ebola, which they’re hearing of more and more.

“The AP has exercised caution in reporting these cases and will continue to do so,” the advisory reads.

Here’s the rest:

Most of these suspected cases turn out to be negative. Our bureaus monitor them, but we have not been moving stories or imagery simply because a doctor suspects Ebola and routine precautions are taken while the patient is tested. To report such a case, we look for a solid source saying Ebola is suspected and some sense the case has caused serious disruption or reaction. Are buildings being closed and substantial numbers of people being evacuated or isolated? Is a plane being diverted? Is the suspected case closely related to another, confirmed Ebola case?

When we do report a suspected case, we will seek to keep our stories brief and in perspective.

The AP issued similar guidance on October 3. My colleague Sam Kirkland wrote about it then.

Often the fact of an unconfirmed case isn’t worth a story at all. On several occasions already, in the U.S. and abroad, we have decided not to report suspected cases. We’ve just stayed in touch with authorities to monitor the situation.

Ebola is capitalized, just a reminder. You probably know how to pronounce it by now.


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While in Russia, two U.S. journalism teachers were hauled before a judge

Joe Bergantino, New England Center for Investigative Reporting

Joe Bergantino, New England Center for Investigative Reporting

Veteran Boston TV investigative reporter Joe Bergantino spent several hours in Russian police custody Thursday after authorities barged in on a journalism training session he and the Newsplex’s Randy Covington were leading in St. Petersburg, Russia. The two were teaching investigative reporting skills to 14 Russian TV, print and online reporters at the time.

Bergantino said in a phone interview that he and Covington had been contracted by the U.S. State Department to teach how to interview, report and think critically.

“We had finished teaching a workshop in Moscow and were just starting a second session in St. Petersburg, Russia when agents from the immigration service walked in,” Bergantino said from Paris. “We were taken to an adjacent room and surrounded by people asking us questions for about an hour.”

He said the officials demanded the two Americans write and sign a statement saying what they were doing in Russia. After writing the statement, the two returned to teaching for five minutes, only to be interrupted a second time. This time the agents shut the workshop down and hauled Bergantino and Covington away.

“This time they took us to an immigration service office and showed us a document that they wanted us to sign saying we were guilty of immigration law violations. We refused to sign it,” Bergantino said. “Then we were taken to a district court. The judge had already determined we were guilty. They initially provided an interpreter who was translating about one-tenth of what was going on.”

Bergantino and Covington were using “targeted tourism visas,” as they said the U.S. State Department told them to do. But the Russians said they needed business visas. “Randy has been to Russia before to train journalists and used the same visa we were using this time,” Bergantino told me.

“The judge told us we were guilty of violating immigration law and issued us a warning.”

As far as they know, Bergantino said, they weren’t fined and they weren’t officially deported.

“She told us we could take our scheduled flight home, but not knowing what might happen next, we took an earlier flight to Paris,” Bergantino said.

Russian journalists interview Bergantino (photo provided by Joe Bergantino)

Russian journalists interview Bergantino (photo provided by Joe Bergantino)

Bergantino is still unsure what was behind the disruption and intimidation.

“What we did hear last night is this is not from the immigration service, it is a higher level. Putin is trying to send a message if you make the Russian life difficult, we will make it difficult for you. They don’t want people from the journalists outside to come in and teach investigative reporting and stir up Russians journalists.”

Bergantino has partnered with Poynter and me on several occasions training investigative reporters as part of his work with the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, which he heads. Before that he had a long career with WBZ-TV, WPLG-TV and has appeared on many national broadcasts including Nightline, World News Tonight and Good Morning America.

The judge did tell the Americans they could return to Russia if they get the “proper” paperwork.

“I would go back, I love the people there,” Bergantino said. “But something tells me I am not going to get the visa they say I need.” Read more

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Cue the outcry — more big Twitter changes on the way

Friday. Good morning (or good evening, if you’re reading this at night). Andrew Beaujon is back next week.

  1. Let’s freak out about Twitter changes: Sayeth Twitter: “in many cases, the best Tweets come from people you already know, or know of. But there are times when you might miss out on Tweets we think you’d enjoy.” Noooooooo! (Twitter) | Stuart Dredge weighs in: “The difference between the two social networks is that Facebook is taking stories out of its news feed – it prioritises around 300 a day out of a possible 1,500 for the average user – while Twitter is only adding tweets in. For now, at least.” (The Guardian) | Previously: I wrote about the Facebookification of Twitter and the Twitterfication of Facebook. (Poynter)
  2. More Twitter changes: Now with audio! “Notably, Twitter is teaming up with Apple to let users listen to certain tracks and buy the music directly from the iTunes store,” Yoree Koh reports. Twitter is also partnering with Soundcloud. (Wall Street Journal) | “Throughout your listening experience, you can dock the Audio Card and keep listening as you continue to browse inside the Twitter app,” product manager Richard Slatter writes in a blog post. (Twitter)
  3. The media kinda sucks at covering Ebola: Just look at how it covered #ClipboardMan, Arielle Duhaime-Ross writes. (The Verge)
  4. Liberian media really sucks at covering Ebola: The Daily Observer newspaper “has become a feeding ground of phony conspiracy,” Terrence McCoy reports. “The top three news stories on the website all allege medical professionals purposely infected the country with Ebola, ideas that have drawn the conspiratorial from across the planet.” The bad journalism is leading to a debate over press freedom in the country. (Washington Post) | From yesterday: The BBC is using WhatsApp to spread accurate information about the virus in Africa. (Journalism.co.uk)
  5. Correction of the week: Deadspin retracted its story claiming U.S. Rep. Cory Gardner didn’t actually play high school football, as he claimed, after the primary source changed his mind. “As serial collectors of media fuck-ups, we add this self-portrait to the gallery,” editor Tommy Craggs writes. (Deadspin) | Earlier, Craggs told Erik Wemple, “If you’re looking for someone to blame here, blame me for getting way too cocky about my site’s ability to prove a negative.” (Washington Post)
  6. Whisper vs. The Guardian: A damning report in The Guardian on Thursday claimed Whisper, “the social media app that promises users anonymity and claims to be ‘the safest place on the internet’, is tracking the location of its users, including some who have specifically asked not to be followed.” (The Guardian) | Whisper editor-in-chief Neetzan Zimmerman angrily denied the report, and wrote on Twitter that the piece “is lousy with falsehoods, and we will be debunking them all.” (Washington Post) | Here’s a good explainer from Carmel DeAmicis: “The two sides disagree over what constitutes ‘personally identifiable information,’ whether rough location data tied to a user’s previous activity could expose someone.” (Gigaom) | And here’s a take from Mathew Ingram, who says Whisper’s problem is that it “wants to be both an anonymous app and a news entity at the same time.” (Gigaom)
  7. American journalists detained in Russia: Joe Bergantino, co-founder of the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, and Randy Covington, a professor at the University of South Carolina, are in Russia to teach an investigative journalism workshop. They were found guilty of “violating the visa regime” and will return to the U.S. on Saturday as scheduled. “Russian authorities have used visa issues in the past as a pretext to bar the entry for certain individuals to the country,” Nataliya Vasilyeva reports. (AP via ABC News)
  8. Good times at High Times: Subscriptions and advertising pages are growing for “the magazine about all things marijuana” as it celebrates its 40th birthday. Dan Skye, High Times’ editorial director, tells Michael Sebastian, “I think the legalization has everything to do with the boom.” (Ad Age)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Daily News (see it at the Newseum).NY_DN
  10. No job moves today: Benjamin Mullin has the day off. But be sure to visit Poynter’s jobs site. Happy weekend!

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup sent to you each morning? Please email abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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‘Having trouble pooping?’ and other awful PR pitches

    We get public relations pitches pretty much all the time, right? Sometimes they’re random. Sometimes really pushy. Sometimes they lead to great stories. And sometimes they feel like they came from bots.

    Earlier this week, I asked for people’s best-worst PR pitches.

    Here’s what I heard:

    The title for that one, by the way, is “Final Advisory to Mankind Final Warning to All Human Beings.”

    On Facebook, Catharin Shepard with The News-Journal in Raeford, North Carolina, wrote this:

    Last week I received in the mail a roughly 100-page manifesto that, as far as I could tell, compared Scientology to the Third Reich and used information from various psychological institutes and authorities to make a case that it is not a real religion. However, it was difficult to tell for certain, because it was written in what I guessed was either German or Dutch. To put this in perspective, I’m a reporter for a small-town newspaper in rural North Carolina.

    And Jen Kopf, a home and garden writer for LancasterOnline in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, shared the best of the best-worst:

    “This week’s winner: ‘”Having trouble pooping?’”

    I spoke with Kopf via email, and she’s digging through her deleted files for that pitch. I’ll share more when I get it. You are now free to make bathroom jokes. And send more bad pitches if you got ‘em. I’ll keep adding.

    paper ball waste paper bin office business


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P-1989 Earthquake

Today in Media History: California’s 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

On October 17, 1989, a powerful California earthquake struck the Bay Area at 5:04 p.m. The Loma Prieta earthquake, which measured 6.9 on the Richter scale, was the largest Bay Area/San Francisco earthquake since 1906.

The earthquake hit during a TV pregame show just before Game 3 of the 1989 World Series at Candlestick Park.

Screenshot from an NBC news report about the earthquake, October 17, 1989

Screenshot from an NBC news report about the earthquake, October 17, 1989

The San Jose Mercury News was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for general news reporting about the earthquake. The Oakland Tribune also earned a Pulitzer for its photographs of the quake’s devastation.

Here is an excerpt from a Mercury News story:

“The biggest earthquake since 1906 — 7 on the Richter scale and possibly higher — hit the Bay Area at 5:04 p.m. Tuesday, killing at least 76 people, injuring more than 460, setting off fires in San Francisco and sending buildings, highways and bridges crashing down on people and cars across the region.

The quake, centered in the Santa Cruz Mountains, lasted from 20 to 40 seconds and frightened millions from Ukiah to San Diego. It was as strong as the quake that ravaged much of Soviet Armenia in December.

….Between 40,000 and 50,000 baseball fans calmly evacuated Candlestick Park, about a half-hour before Game 3 of the World Series — even taking with them souvenir chunks of concrete that had fallen from the stadium. The series was delayed indefinitely while officials tried to assess the damage to Candlestick and the Oakland Coliseum.

As many as a million people from Hollister to San Francisco were without power in the hours after the quake and well into the night as Pacific Gas & Electric Co. crews scrambled to repair lines. Much of San Francisco remained enveloped in darkness at midnight.”

TV news reports about the earthquake from ABC, CBS, NBC and CNN:

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Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014

State senator to laid-off reporter: ‘So do YOU have any comments now?’

Cari Gervin was a reporter and literary editor at The (Knoxville, Tennessee) Metro Pulse before the entire staff of the alt-weekly was cut Wednesday.

The former staff of The Pulse has been overwhelmed with and love and support from the community, Gervin said. But one reaction wasn’t so positive.

On Thursday, Gervin posted an image of a Facebook message that appears to be from state Sen. Stacey Campfield that read: “So do YOU have any comments now ;)”

FaceBookMessage

The message from Campfield — whom The Pulse had a contentious relationship with — stood in stark contrast to reactions from the rest of the community, Gervin said.

Since the announcement, we have been overwhelmed with the amount of love and support we’ve received from the community, via social media, email, phone calls, and even a very large bar tab donated to us last night by a mix of friends and complete strangers. So to receive such a tacky, cruel Facebook message from Campfield this afternoon – especially since we have never communicated on Facebook and he had previously blocked me on the site – was especially distressing.

When reached by phone, Campfield declined to comment. Read more

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In Hong Kong, Apple Daily gets to deliver papers after days of blockades

Wall Street Journal | The Huffington Post | Committee to Protect Journalists

Readers in Hong Kong should get their copy of the pro-democracy newspaper Apple Daily on Friday.

For several days, “mobs have surrounded Apple Daily’s offices to intimidate staff and prevent distribution of the paper,” the Wall Street Journal wrote in an opinion piece on Tuesday.

Early Monday morning they blocked delivery trucks from exiting the complex by parking a tractor-trailer across the gate. Apple Daily staff eventually used a crane to load newspapers onto different trucks across a back wall, so newsstands got copies after a delay of about six hours.

This tweet, from the Journal’s Isabella Steger, says the papers made it out on Thursday night.

And from Bloomberg’s Fion Li:

On Monday, Apple Daily posted this image on its Facebook page, with an apology to readers who didn’t get their newspapers.

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On Wednesday, Matt Sheehan wrote for Huffington Post’s The World Post about blocked deliveries and the paper itself.

With one of the largest readerships in Hong Kong, Apple Daily is known for its defiant pro-democracy positions, shrill and sensational reporting style, and occasionally lax standards for fact-checking.

The paper is run by brash media mogul Jimmy Lai, a man who makes no secret of his deep loathing for the Chinese government. As a 12-year-old, Lai smuggled himself out of famine-stricken China in 1960 and into Hong Kong. There, he went on to build a clothing and media empire that he now deploys in a running grudge match with Beijing. His paper subsidizes pro-democracy advertisements and has in the past printed two-page spreads that can serve as anti-government banners at protests.

While some local journalists cringe at what they see as the paper’s affinity for gossip and sex scandals, they say it remains one of the few bulwarks against a creeping pro-Beijing influence in Hong Kong media.

Sheehan includes this video from Wednesday, with Apple Daily employees and anti-occupy protesters.

On Thursday, Bob Dietz wrote for the Committee to Protect Journalists about “Hong Kong’s media battlefield”, including how journalists have been treated. Dietz also writes that while the Apple Daily has been physically blocked, it has had to fight online, too.

Tuesday, spokesman Mark Simon told a reporter who has been working with CPJ, “More disturbing to us than the street protests is the continued denial of service attacks on our website. At times they bring down our website for up to an hour.”

Who is carrying out the attacks? “We always had a good firewall, which we have improved upon. That makes us think the attacks on us are of a governmental scale. Our audience tends to be local and across the border. We certainly believe attacks are coming from the entity that would most benefit from silencing Next Media [Apple's parent company]. That’s what we’ll say on the matter,” Simon said.

Here’s a Twitter list of journalists covering the protests in Hong Kong. Read more

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From Poynter, an innovator in residence, a scholarship for women leaders and more

The Poynter Institute announced three new initiatives on Thursday — innovator in residence, a scholarship for women in leadership and The Frank E. Duckwall Foundation Community Conversations @ Poynter.

According to the press release, the three programs support Poynter’s new direction by aiming “to build and share thought leadership with the community, to ignite innovation and to promote and advance women in journalism leadership and media innovation.” The three initiatives are funded through private funding. Two women were awarded the scholarship on Monday, October 13th — Amanda Wilkins, senior digital editor for the Dallas Morning News, and Sara Hebel, assistant managing editor for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Both women received the scholarships to attend Poynter’s Leadership Academy.

The Innovator in Residence program will “help bring a visionary, dynamic thought leader to advise Poynter faculty on how to best meet journalism’s need to be nimble, inclusive and dynamic in unprecedented ways in a continuously shifting media landscape,” according to the release. The position is expected to begin in January of 2015.

The Women in Leadership Scholarship “will provide women with the opportunity to advance their leadership roles and to grow the scope, influence and impact of women leaders in journalism and the media.”

And The Frank E. Duckwall Foundation Community Conversations @ Poynter, which gets support from the Frank E. Duckwall Foundation, will bring a series of public conversations to Poynter “as an interactive public dialogue that will bring a 21st century global thought leader to the community.” Read more

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Here are 37 great journalism internships and fellowships for application season

For journalism students, October through January is internship application season, a pressure cooker of equal parts excitement and anxiety.

It’s our profession’s draft day. By mid-march, most of your classmates will have declared their intention to work at a journalism organization, like a prized NFL recruit putting on their team’s hat in front of a live studio audience.

Don’t get left behind. Some of the applications for the most prestigious news organizations are due in a few weeks time, so work up the courage to request that letter of recommendation, update your résumé and figure out how stamps work.

To make the process a little easier, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best journalism internships I could find on the Web, many of which I applied for myself when I was in school. If you have questions about this list or know some great internships I’ve forgotten, tweet them to #POYinternlist or send me an email: bmullin@poynter.org.

The New York Times James Reston Reporting Fellowship
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: New York City
Pay: $1,000 per week
Description: “Beginning with the second week, the Reston Fellows start work in a section that reflects their skills and area of interest to report and write stories under the guidance of editors or senior reporters. Some stories are assigned, but fellows are encouraged to come up with their own ideas. They also participate in workshops with ranking editors and reporters. The goal of the program is to provide an opportunity for the fellows to stretch their journalistic skills with the help of some of the best reporters and editors in the country.”

The Washington Post
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $750 per week
Description: “Our interns write articles, edit copy, take photographs, design pages and produce graphics. We treat them as staff members during their 12 weeks of employment.”

The Boston Globe
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Boston
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Summer interns work as full-time employees for 12 weeks, between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Interns are paid a weekly wage, and shifts vary. An intern supervisor serves as a writing coach and there are weekly meetings with editors and staff members on a range of issues and topics pertaining to journalism.”

Associated Press Global News Internship
Deadline: Not settled yet; likely the first week of January, per AP spokesman Paul Colford.
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The summer 2014 Global News Internship is a paid, highly selective, 12-week individually tailored training program for students who are aspiring cross-format journalists. Interns must have experience and/or training in video and one other format. They will contribute to AP’s text, video, photo and interactive reporting.”

Reuters Global Journalism Internships
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Global Journalism Internships offer talented students and graduates an opportunity to learn and shine in our bureaus internationally. The paid internships are a crash course in hands-on business, political and general news reporting. Every intern will report to a senior editor and be assigned a journalist mentor to provide advice and guidance during the summer. They’re expected to write regularly and deliver in-depth stories during their assignment. Interns will receive several days of formal training before they start work, focused on writing skills, journalism ethics and basic financial knowledge. They may also be able to take advantage of other, regularly scheduled training opportunities during the summer, depending on where they’re based.”

Texas Tribune News Apps Internships
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $5,000 over 10 weeks
Description: “Are you a journalism student or would-be reporter in another major? Know a little bit about HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and/or Python/Django, and would like to continue to hone your skills? Are you passionate about politics, policy and open government? You should join us. You’ll work directly with news apps developers, reporters and editors in the newsroom. Interns are first-class citizens on our team – in the past, they’ve had the opportunity to not only contribute to high-profile projects but to take the lead on them. You’ll get to create data visualizations and maps, participate in an active and friendly newsroom, play a role in editorial meetings and contribute to a number of different beats. We’re looking for someone passionate about web standards and the little details. Someone willing to show their work. Someone looking to learn. If you’re interested, send your resume and links to previous projects and/or your GitHub account to rmurphy@texastribune.org.”

Texas Tribune reporting internship
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $2,000 over 10 weeks
Description: The Texas Tribune internship program provides aspiring journalists the opportunity to hone their reporting skills and learn a host of new ones that will prepare them for the 21st century newsroom. “This is not a teaching hospital,” in the words of our fearless leader, CEO and Editor-in-Chief Evan Smith. We expect interns who are anxious to dive into daily news coverage alongside our seasoned reporting staff. Interns at the Tribune write stories and blog posts, shoot photos and video, develop news apps and assist with our major data projects. Intern work has appeared in Texas editions of The New York Times through our partnership with the most prestigious newspaper in the country.

Reuters Journalism Program
Deadline: Dec. 15
Location: New York, London or Asia
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Journalism Program offers nine months of hands-on, real-world experience with competitive pay in New York, London and Asia. You will gain a deep grounding in all aspects of financial reporting, work on fast-paced news stories and develop skills in enterprise journalism. The program seeks rising reporters, recent graduates or business professionals who can demonstrate a clear commitment to a career in journalism and an ability to generate story ideas relevant for a Reuters audience.”

The Los Angeles Times
Deadline: Jan. 1
Location: Los Angeles, Washington D.C.
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Interested in working with some of the best journalists around? We offer 10 weeks of intensive, hands-on experience in a region where big stories are the norm. We place interns throughout the L.A. Times: Metro/Local, Sports, Business, Features (Home, Image, Travel, Food, Mind & Body), Arts & Entertainment, Editorial Pages, Washington, D.C., bureau, Photography/Video, Data Desk, Visualization & Graphics, Design and latimes.com. These are paid internships and summer placements usually run from mid-June to late August.”

The Tampa Bay Times
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: St. Petersburg, Tampa, Clearwater, Port Richey and Brooksville
Pay: $450 per week
Description: “Florida’s largest and best newspaper, with 10 Pulitzer Prizes, is looking for energetic, talented young people for internships in all of its departments. Internships range from 12-week summer experiences to 6-month and 1-year jobs. You will be considered a full staff member and work alongside colleagues who will serve as mentors. Our internship programs are designed to give you hands-on experience to add to your academic credentials.

The South Florida Sun Sentinel
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Pay: $7.93 per hour
Description: “We offer seven paid internships throughout our digital-print newsroom. For 11 intensive weeks, from June to mid-August, you will report and write stories, shoot and edit video-photo, or design. We treat our interns as regular staffers, under the guidance of seasoned journalists. We offer internships in various newsroom departments: Metro-news, business, features, sports, video-photo, design, and our Spanish-language weekly, El Sentinel. We also offer weekly sessions with veteran journalists and senior editors on a wide range of topics, including career advice. It’s hard work and great fun.”

Google Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Around the end of January
Location: Various journalism nonprofits throughout the United States
Pay: $8,000 for 10-weeks, plus $1,000 travel stipend
Description: “The program is aimed at undergraduate, graduate and journalism students interested in using technology to tell stories in new and dynamic ways. The Fellows will get the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to a variety of organizations — from those that are steeped in investigative journalism to those working for press freedom around the world and to those that are helping the industry figure out its future in the digital age.”
Disclaimer: I was a 2014 Google fellow.

Atlantic Media Fellowship Program
Deadline: End of February 2015
Location: Washington, D.C. and New York City
Pay: $25,000 per year, with full benefits
Description: “Atlantic Media offers high-achieving recent college graduates a unique opportunity to participate in the Atlantic Media Fellowship Program. The Program is a structured, year-long paid fellowship for top-tier talent committed to editorial-side or business-side careers in media. Each year we look forward to our new class of Fellows, who add a fresh perspective and new ideas to our company initiatives. As a digital-first company, we have experienced tremendous growth as a result of emphasis on digital initiatives, and our Fellows have been key contributors.”

The Seattle Times
Deadline: Nov. 15.
Location: Seattle
Pay: $540 per week
Description: “The Seattle Times offers paid summer internships to outstanding students pursuing a career in journalism. For 10 weeks, interns work on varied assignments and attend weekly training sessions with members of a Pulitzer Prize-winning staff. Interns receive a skill-development plan and work with a staff mentor to achieve it. Internships are open to sophomores, juniors, seniors and graduate students attending a four-year college or university. Applicants must have a demonstrated commitment to print and online journalism. At least one previous internship at a daily news organization is preferred, and multimedia experience is a plus.”

Austin American-Statesman
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $450 per week, plus free housing.
Description: “Our objective is to help interns grow with challenging assignments. In other words, you won’t spend your time writing police briefs, taking mug shots and running errands. Last summer, one intern finished with three dozen bylines, three-quarters of which were on the front page or the Metro cover.”

The Chicago Tribune
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Chicago
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Chicago Tribune’s newsroom internship program seeks college juniors, seniors and graduate students for 12-week paid internships. Opportunities will be considered in all newsroom departments: metro, sports, business, graphics, copy editing, design, photo/video, entertainment, events, social media and lifestyle.”

The Dallas Morning News
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: Dallas
Pay: $15 per hour
Description: “We offer several 12-week college internships for news reporting, copy editing, business news, features, sports, photography and our website, dallasnews.com. Interns are treated as full-time staffers and typically, at least one is hired for a full-time position at the conclusion of the internship.”

Student Press Law Center
Deadline: Jan. 31
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $3,500 stipend
Description: “Journalism interns research, write and help edit the Report, the Center’s magazine that chronicles student press law cases and controversies from around the country. Interns also write breaking news and analysis pieces for the Center’s website. Those with an interest in video and multimedia are especially encouraged to apply, and help us create the images that will bring students’ censorship experiences to life.”

The Oregonian
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Portland, Oregon
Pay: $440 per week
Description: “Oregonian Media Group offers a 10-week summer intern program for college students who wish to work as multimedia journalists in The Oregonian newsroom. We’re looking for primarily upperclassmen with previous internship experience who want to work in a digital-first environment doing smart stories for readers of OREGONLIVE.COM online and The Oregonian in print. We want critical thinkers, students who have a portfolio that shows ambition and skill across platforms, reporters and photographers who want to make a difference with readers – however those readers find us.
If selected, you will be assigned to a team for the summer, paired with a staff mentor and provided opportunities to learn from experienced journalists through group discussions with other interns.”

NPR’s Kroc Fellowship:
Deadline: Dec. 31
Location: NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., and member station.
Pay:: $40,000 per year
Description: “The Fellowship is designed to offer exposure to various units at NPR, in both the News and Digital Divisions, and at an NPR Member Station. NPR Kroc Fellows work alongside some of the nation’s most respected reporters, producers and editors and receive regular instruction in writing for radio and on-air performance. The Fellowship begins in August and lasts one year. Fellows receive a stipend of more than $40,000 and benefits, including paid vacation. NPR will provide Kroc Fellows with professional guidance and assist in job placement.”

Pulliam Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Indianapolis and Phoenix
Pay: $650 per week
Description: “You’ll be a member of our newsroom, work hard and gain valuable journalism experience. You get paid, too. Our Pulliam Fellows earn $650/week for the 10-week program. You’ll also get to participate in writing workshops and learn over lunch from some of the best minds in journalism.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Minneapolis
Pay:: $706 per week
Description: “The Star Tribune newsroom offers one of the best summer internship programs available in our industry. We select at least 10 candidates for paid 10-week internships each summer. The program targets college and graduate students interested in pursuing careers as reporters, copy editors/multiplatform editors, designers, photographers and multimedia producers.”

Chronicle of Higher Education
Deadline: Jan. Read more

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Interstate General Media to close Inquirer.com

Philadelphia Magazine

Inquirer.com and PhillyDailyNews.com, standalone websites for two newspapers owned by Interstate General Media, will soon close, Philadelphia Magazine reported Thursday.

According to a memo obtained by Philadelphia Magazine, the two sites, which feature content from The Philadelphia Inquirer and The Philadelphia Daily News, will be “folded into” one site, Philly.com:

What this means is that the standalone newspaper-branded sites will no longer exist and will instead redirect readers to Philly.com, where users will find Inquirer and Daily News journalism featured more prominently and have access to branded Inquirer and Daily News section fronts that represent the editorial voice and judgment of the newspapers.

The decision marks an end of an experiment began in April 2013, when both newspapers unveiled the subscription-based sites. The sites were designed to “reflect the papers’ personalities”

A few newspapers have released parallel free and subscription-based sites, including The San Francisco Chronicle (which maintains sfgate.com free of charge and sfchronicle.com for subscribers) and The Boston Globe (which offers boston.com for free and bostonglobe.com with a metered paywall system) Read more

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