ADVERTISEMENT

Tips/Training

NEWS

Broadcasters, what should you do when you get 'videobombed?'

Broadcasters in Rio for the 2016 Olympics have shown viewers wins and losses, scenic beaches and glimpses at struggles that will continue after the games are over. On BBC Four, they've also included a bachelorette party. BBC Four's Dan Walker was reporting from Copacabana Beach a few days ago when some unexpected guests stopped by. He was a good sport … Read More
NEWS

4 verbal listening skills when you're working with staff members

Leaders can help themselves and their staffs by practicing the art of active listening. Here are some verbal skills to help. Encouraging conveys interest, leading the reporter to keep talking. Don’t agree or disagree, but use noncommittal words with a positive tone of voice: "I see," "Uh-huh," "That’s interesting," "Hmmm ..." Restating shows that you're listening and lets the reporter … Read More
NEWS

How to find the untold stories in your community

Differences between people and communities play an important role in your coverage and your storytelling. Here are some ways to improve your ability to find and tell stories off the beaten path. Journalists don't have to share beliefs or have a commonality with the people you cover. Interview across differences by showing that you care, researching your subject's background, admitting … Read More
NEWS

Questions to ask during the first edit of a story

For an editor, coaching means engaging the writer in an ongoing conversation about the story, from the conception of the idea to the final edit. The more time and thought you invest in this conversation, the less work you will likely face in “fixing” the story when it comes in. One key moment in coaching is during the first edit. Read More
NEWS

Questions to ask public relations staff when you're covering scientific research

Journalists talk to a variety of sources about scientific research. Different types of sources have different qualifications and can provide different types of information. Here are some considerations and questions when you are interviewing public relations staff in the industry you are covering. For subject matter expertise, ask: Does this person have academic credentials related to this topic? A client … Read More
NEWS

4 guidelines to avoid plagiarizing

Poynter has just launched a new course about avoiding plagiarism and fabrication, created by Geanne Belton in a collaboration with Baruch College. Thanks to the generous support of the Harnisch Foundation, this course is free of charge on Poynter's online training platform, News University. Today's Coffee Break Course is courtesy of this new teaching. Plagiarism breaks the trust between … Read More
NEWS

7 ways to improve your video storytelling

The best video stories get close to help viewers feel, taste, hear, smell and see the story. And they get wide to give viewers context and perspective. Here are some ways to bring viewers into your story. Put the camera on the shadow side to record better video. Have your source face 20 or 30 degrees away from the key … Read More
NEWS

How audio brings a story to life

Sound is vital to online and broadcast journalism. In radio and podcasts, sound is the only way to impart meaning and convey emotion. Online and in TV, sound can complement words and visuals in powerful ways, often enhancing an already well-told story. Sound can bring a story to life in many ways: Interviews capture the voices of the people we … Read More
NEWS

Questions to ask scientists about scientific research

Journalists talk to a variety of sources about scientific research. Different types of sources have different qualifications and can provide different types of information. Here are some considerations and questions when you are interviewing scientists. To understand their academic background, check: Educational background Number of publications Lack of retractions on RetractionWatch.com Questions to ask: Why does this study matter? Why … Read More
NEWS

How to focus on the people in every story

The lead of a story makes a promise to the reader of good things to come. The classic journalism device of asking five W's (who, what, where, when, why), an H (how) and an SW (so what) helps you analyze, organize and present the beginning of a news story. Let's start with "who" to discover the newsworthy elements of your … Read More
NEWS

6 ways to make better photographic portraits

Photos are an important element of any story you tell about a person. An expressive photograph of a person captures a key part of his or her personality. Here are some ways to get genuine, authentic images with journalistic excellence. Do some reporting so you know something about your subject. Feel free to ask questions such as "Where are you … Read More
NEWS

8 writing lessons from Michelle Obama's DNC speech

Great oratory magnifies the lessons of great writing. Written for the ear, memorable speeches tend to use certain rhetorical devices — such as parallelism or emphatic word order — in greater measure than less dramatic forms of communication. The language strategies rise to the surface, so you may not even need a pair of X-ray reading glasses to see them. Read More
NEWS

AP's Rio style guide: Olympiad is confusing, 'best to avoid...'

The Associated Press published a timely style guide Monday ahead of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. The games, which begin on Aug. 5, are not synonymous with the word Olympiad, for instance. Best to avoid as the term can be confusing. It is not a synonym for the Olympics. It is a period of … Read More
NEWS

How surveys can help you understand your news audience

You want your audience to engage with your news product: read it, value it, think about it, talk about it, share it, return to it and trust it. So you have to understand your audience's behaviors, needs and motivations to create stories and products that are valuable and engaging. The deepest, most accurate understanding of your audience comes from quantitative … Read More
ADVERTISEMENT