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In Case You Missed It

Gawker attorney cross-examines Hulk Hogan's journalism expert

In day four of the invasion-of-privacy trial pitting Gawker Media against ex-professional wrestler Hulk Hogan, an attorney for the media company pressed Hogan's legal expert on his testimony. Mike Foley, the former executive editor of the Poynter-owned Tampa Bay Times, said that Gawker violated the "Cheerios test" — a simple barometer of decency and taste — when it published an excerpt from a sex tape featuring Hogan. The lawyer pushed back by asking whether Playboy founder Hugh Hefner violated the "Cheerios test."

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Los Angeles Times photographer arrested while covering Nancy Reagan's funeral motorcade

Ricardo DeAratanha, a photographer for the Los Angeles Times, was arrested on suspicion of resisting and obstructing a police officer while covering Nancy Reagan's funeral motorcade. The arresting officer said he didn't adequately ID himself. The photographer's lawyer said he provided plenty of identification.

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Obama administration tried to undermine FOIA law, documents show

New documents released to the Freedom of the Press Foundation by the Department of Justice show that the Obama administration has "worked aggressively behind the scenes to scuttle congressional reforms designed to give the public better access to information possessed by the federal government."

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Gawker Media v. Hulk Hogan (cont.)

During a three-hour cross-examination Tuesday, former professional wrestler Hulk Hogan was grilled by an attorney for Gawker Media about his private and professional lives. "Attorneys for Gawker argue that publishing Daulerio's story and posting the video are protected by the First Amendment because Hogan has made his sexual exploits a matter of public interest, and that the sex tape had already been the subject of media coverage."

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Hulk Hogan takes the stand

Hulk Hogan (real name: Terry Bollea) testified Monday in his multi-million dollar invasion of privacy lawsuit against Gawker Media. "I was embarrassed by what it did to me as a person, but it was even embarrassing as a character. Hulk Hogan was embarrassed."

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Donald Trump doesn't understand how libel law works

Donald Trump's statement that he plans to "open up" the country's libel laws to speed litigation against America's national newspapers is bunk, says the CEO and president of the national newspaper association. "But we all know that Mr. Trump isn't interested in legalities in this case."

NEWS

Donald Trump calls for harsher libel laws at campaign rally

Donald Trump continued his crusade against the press Friday afternoon, saying he wants to "open up" libel laws to enable easier retribution against journalists. The remarks came during a campaign rally in Fort Worth, Texas, where Trump abused both The Washington Post and The New York Times and darkly suggested The Post would "have problems" under a Trump … Read More
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Washington Post bureau chief caught and released in Israel

William Booth, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The Washington Post, was briefly detained by Israeli authorities while conducting interviews. He was held up for about 30 minutes. The brush with police came just weeks after Jason Rezaian, the Tehran bureau chief for The Washington Post, was released after more than a year of imprisonment.

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Protecting student journalism nationwide

The rash of student media advisers who've been fired, combined with censorship of student newspapers, has prompted the Student Press Law Center to call for legislation ensuring trainee journalists the right to unabridged free speech.

NEWS

Little League parents sue ESPN and Stephen A. Smith in aftermath of Chicago scandal

The feel-good sports story of the 2014 summer has, inevitably, wound up in court. Parents of former players from Chicago's Jackie Robinson West Little League team filed a federal court lawsuit Thursday against Little League International, the local league, various officials and both ESPN and commentator Stephen A. Smith. In sum, they either claim that the leagues and network … Read More
NEWS

Amid the Flint water crisis, journalists are calling for changes to Michigan's FOIA law

When Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder released emails related to the ongoing water crisis in the city of Flint earlier this month, he was under no obligation to do so. Michigan is one of only two states in the country (Massachusetts is the other) where the state’s Freedom of Information Act excludes the governor’s office from public records … Read More
NEWS

Reporter reveals ‘12 kinds of emails’ professor got after blocking media

I remember watching coverage of the protests at the University of Missouri in November and seeing a YouTube video of an assistant professor grabbing at a journalist’s camera and calling for backup to block him from recording. "Who wants to help me get this reporter out of here? I need some muscle over here!" Melissa Click said in the … Read More
NEWS

50 states, 50 public records stories

Each month in this column, I try to feature journalists who are telling important stories using public records. For my final column of 2015, I wanted to do something big and decided to find public records stories from all 50 states (plus, a bonus: Washington, D.C.). This is not meant to be a “best of” list. It’s simply a collection … Read More
NEWS

Can FOIA be funny?

Can FOIA be funny? Curtis Raye thinks so. He has created a comedy show celebrating the quirky, off-the-wall records he and others have found through the Freedom of Information Act. Raye, a writer and former improv teacher, says he created “FOIA Love: A Comedy Show About Public Records” after spending nearly a year working as a field … Read More
NEWS

Ask for check registers and other public records tips you probably haven't thought of

Check out the checks. (Photo by jridgewayphotography/Flickr) I was at a journalism conference in Nashville last year when I heard about a public record I had never thought to request. Tawnell Hobbs, a reporter at The Dallas Morning News, was giving a presentation on school finance reporting when she mentioned an investigative story she had done using … Read More
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