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Here’s who is and isn’t redacting the explicit NY Daily News front

cover

Many publications are blurring or otherwise redacting today’s controversial New York Daily News front showing three stills from the chilling first-person video of the murder of two journalists.

The ethics of using the stills, which have been widely criticized on social media, have been debated among journalists because of their graphic nature. Kelly McBride, Poynter’s vice president for academic programs and a media ethicist, argues against using the unedited pictures.

“The problem with it is that it a deeply intimate image.” McBride said. “It is a moment of someone’s death.”

Some publications opted to publish the full, unedited image. Others decided not to include an image at all:

Slate

In a column titled “Why That Daily News Cover Crosses the Line,” Slate decided to include a blurred version of the cover. Read more

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WDBJ GM: ‘It’s going to take time for us to heal’

Jeff Marks, president and general manager at WDBJ, addresses gathered media outlets Thursday afternoon. (Screenshot)

Jeff Marks, president and general manager at WDBJ, addresses gathered media outlets Thursday afternoon. (Screenshot)


The day after two journalists from WDBJ in Roanoke, Virginia were murdered by a former colleague, the station’s president and general manager said employees at the CBS affiliate are deep in mourning.

Speaking to representatives from local and national media outlets, Jeff Marks said the station is striving to move forward after the murders of Alison Parker and Adam Ward, who were killed while covering a feature story in nearby Moneta, Virginia.

“It’s going to take time for us to heal,” Marks said.

He added that the station is still refraining from sending journalists out to cover stories live so soon after the shooting, but police have offered to provide protection for journalists out on assignment. Read more

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NPPA: Forcing BBC to delete Virginia shooting images was ‘unlawful’

Virginia police officers acted unlawfully when ordering two BBC journalists to delete images from their cameras after Wednesday’s on-air shootings near Roanoke, the attorney for a photojournalism group alleged Thursday.

In a letter addressed to a spokesperson for Virginia State Police, Mickey Osterreicher, general counsel National Press Photographers Association, calls the forcible deletion “unlawful” and calls on the agency to investigate the matter.

“The NPPA is extremely troubled by what appears to an attempt to prevent them from covering the story or document police activity,” Osterreicher writes. “For us this is the worst example of a prior restraint of free speech and of the press. While I understand tensions were high this misguided and illegal action was an abridgment of the First, Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment.”

Osterreicher’s letter comes less than a day after BBC journalists Franz Strasser and Tara McKelvey were asked by Virginia police to delete images from their cameras taken while covering the story of the murders of Alison Parker and Adam Ward, two journalists from CBS affiliate WDBJ in Roanoke, Virginia. Read more

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Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 11.16.26 AM

Can a magazine live forever? Scientific American, at 170, is giving it a shot

The oldest continuously published magazine in the United States, Scientific American, is marking its 170th birthday this week — cause for a promotional celebration at its New York offices Wednesday night and also an occasion to look at the title’s secrets to longevity.

To get a little Darwinian, the publication had a strong, sustaining concept from the start, stuck with that idea for the long haul, but also adapted with variations as times changed.

Mariette DiChristina

Mariette DiChristina

The first issue in 1845, editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina reminded me in a phone interview, carried as a subtitle, “The Advocate of Industry and Enterprise, and Journal of Mechanical and Other Improvements.”

The current media kit claims that Scientific American’s eclectic mix of readers, “all have one thing in common – a thirst for visionary, optimistic and science-based solutions in a world filled with complexities and fluff.”  Same point as in 1845 but with a 21st Century spin. Read more

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Associated Press sues FBI seeking records in bogus news story

The Associated Press

The Associated Press and the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press on Thursday filed suit against the U.S. Department of Justice in pursuit of records connected to a fictitious news story concocted by the FBI to help catch a 15-year-old suspect, Michael Biesecker reports for the AP.

The lawsuit stems from an incident in 2007, when an FBI officer investigating bomb threats pretended to be an AP reporter and asked a suspect if he would look over a draft of an article about the threats to be sure he was described accurately. When clicked, the link to the fake news story allowed the FBI to deploy “court-authorized tools” to find the suspect.

When the incident came to light last year, Associated Press Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll called the FBI’s subterfuge “unacceptable” and said it eroded the public’s trust in the press. Read more

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Morning news crews say: “We stand with #WDBJ7″

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Front page of the day: Remembering Alison Parker and Adam Ward

This morning, I am not going to show you any front pages with images of someone about to be murdered, taken by the person who did the killing. Those images are out there and you can find them.

Today, I was looking for front pages that taught me something I didn’t know. Many focused on the horror of the murders and how they played out on live TV and social media. But just as many showed a community grieving and told more of the lives and work of Alison Parker and photographer Adam Ward.

Today’s front page of the day comes from the Richmond Times-Dispatch, which devoted the entire front to the story.

VA_RTD

Here’s a small collection of fronts from Virginia on the WDBJ shooting and aftermath, via Newseum. Read more

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There was a moment of silence this morning on WDBJ

WDBJ

At 6:45 a.m. on Thursday morning, WDBJ in Roanoke, Virginia, observed a moment of silence. That was the time on Wednesday when reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward were killed by a former co-worker on live TV. “As we approach that moment we want to pause and reflect and we want to share with you once again what made these two so special…,” anchor Kim McBroom said.

From CBS:

You can find our coverage of this story and thoughts on how to deal with the video and images that have come from it here. Read more

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The challenge no manager wants: Leading an organization through its grief

Screen shot, WDBJ

Jeff Marks, the General Manager of WDBJ, and anchor Kimberly McBroom (Screen shot, WDBJ)

No manager gets out of bed in the morning expecting to have two of his staffers murdered.

By a former station employee.

On live TV.

But that’s what happened to Jeff Marks, the General Manager of WDBJ in Roanoke, Virginia. In the seconds it took for a man with a gun to fatally shoot a reporter and photographer, Marks’ role changed. Suddenly a man responsible for running his company’s broadcast business was called upon to lead an organization through a nightmare.

It is a job without a ready-made script. There are lots of expert suggestions, but ultimately, the leader has to choose.

In the hours that followed, Marks went on the air to announce the deaths of reporter Alison Parker and photographer Adam Ward. Read more

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Tragedy in real time

Good morning.

  1. Broadcasting and covering a crime

    It was astonishing. There was the shocking convergence of a local TV station's unintended live broadcast of murder and the ability of social media to transmit it around the globe. Bingo, in a moment, just like that. The shooter's own video account was there, too, albeit briefly (how long before Hollywood parrots this grotesque gambit?). In relatively quick time, Twitter and Facebook yanked that choreographed self-portrayal. There were, too, the mistaken reports of the shooter being dead. Under awful circumstances, the Roanoke, Virginia, station did an admirable job as its general manager took to the anchor desk and assisted his young staff. (WDBJ7)

    In a world in which speed is paramount, editors agonized but didn't always wind up doing the same thing.

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Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015

Alison Fitzgerald joins NPR as health policy correspondent

Alison Fitzgerald, previously a managing editor for the Center for Public Integrity, is joining NPR as a health policy correspondent on the science desk, the network announced today.

Joe Neel, the deputy senior supervising editor for NPR’s science desk, announced Fitzgerald’s appointment in a memo to staffers Wednesday afternoon, praising her track record as an award-winning journalist:

An accomplished economics and investigative journalist, Alison has covered many of the major stories of our time at wire services, newspapers, magazines and television. She’s won numerous awards, most notably three Polk awards (in 2009, 2013 and 2014) — and the 2011 Everett Dirksen Award for distinguished reporting of Congress.

Fitzgerald’s departure comes amid a new era at the Center for Public Integrity. Peter Bale, previously the vice president and general manager of digital operations at CNN International, succeeded William E. Read more

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Photo by Andreas Eldh/Flickr

The Virginia shooting and the dark side of the social media age

I saw a clip of Matt Lauer today. He said that viewing the video of the murder of two journalists “took my breath away.” Here is the man, I thought, who broadcast to me news of planes flying into the twin towers on 9/11. It must take a lot to take this veteran’s breath away.

Then I watched the one-minute video myself, and I knew what he meant. It seems unreal at first, even though I know what is going to happen. I cringe. It gives off the feel of a deranged person imitating a video game. You see this person approaching three people in the middle of a television news feature. A friendly reporter interviews another woman. A man, seen from the back, operates a camera. Read more

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Trump’s media bashing: Has he no decency?

Miami-based Univision anchor Jorge Ramos, left, asks Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a question about his immigration proposal during a news conference, Tuesday in Dubuque, Iowa. Ramos was later removed from the room. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Miami-based Univision anchor Jorge Ramos, left, asks Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a question about his immigration proposal during a news conference, Tuesday in Dubuque, Iowa. Ramos was later removed from the room. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

“Go back to Univision.”

Donald Trump’s declaration to Jorge Ramos, a respected star of Spanish-language broadcasting, was the most flagrantly dismissive comment he’s made to a media member in a campaign full of them.

“He referred to Univision almost as if it was some other land. Some people will hear, ‘Go back to Mexico,’” said Ricardo Ramirez, a political scientist at the University of Notre Dame.

Ramos, a sort of Walter Cronkite to his millions of viewers, has been unrelenting in raising questions about Trump, especially on immigration.

In so doing, he’s been acting as any responsible press organization should in a democracy. Read more

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How some publications are dealing with WDBJ shooting footage

Screen shot, BuzzFeed

Screen shot, BuzzFeed

The on-air shooting of WDBJ reporter Alison Parker and videographer Adam Ward has sparked a debate – should publications be sharing the graphic video of the shooting?

Al Tompkins of Poynter says that “it depends.”

It depends on why you are using the video and how you will use it and how long you will use it.

When the shooting first happened, Jacob Wycoff, a meteorologist for Weather Bug, tweeted video footage from the live broadcast. It got several retweets and was shared by BuzzFeed.

“I think the situation was newsworthy and therefore posted the video,” Wycoff said.

Minutes later, he removed it.

“I realized it was best to take it down. I have friends on the WDBJ weather team and didn’t want to contribute to any of their pain,” he told Poynter via Facebook. Read more

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Journalists rally around fallen broadcasters with #WeStandWithWDBJ

Hours after the murders of reporter Alison Parker and videographer Adam Ward, American journalists have begun tweeting out their support of WDBJ, the Roanoke, Virginia TV station where both broadcasters worked.

Using the hashtag #WeStandWithWDBJ, anchors, producers and photographers offered words of support and condolences in the wake of the murders.

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