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Front page of the day: And then there were 10 (for the debate at least)

Today’s front page of the day comes via Newseum from The Bakersfield Californian, which led Wednesday with the 10 GOP presidential hopefuls who made it into the Thursday Fox News debate.

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Thursday’s debate made the front page in other cities around the country, too. Here’s a sampling:

The (Baton Rouge, Louisiana) Advocate went with bobble heads:
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The Austin (Texas) American-Statesman has a pyramid of power:
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The Dallas (Texas) Morning News showed the 10 who made it into the debate and the seven who did not:
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And USA TODAY shows us “the 10 who are in:”
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Telling stories visually: 5 designers and their advice for writers

Photo by Leonid Mamchenkov/Flickr

Photo by Leonid Mamchenkov/Flickr

Learning how to design, Oliver Reichenstein wrote in his letter to the profession, is like learning how to see. “Good design is when I see it,” he said of the audience’s subjective taste. The opposite is true, too — bad design is easily recognized.

Articles, features and longform stories are designed to be read, viewed, heard. Our stories are written on the Web, read in an app, printed onto paper, translated in a text-to-talk speaker, displayed in a presentation, spoken over radio waves, all with intentional structure and design to be easily consumed and understood. By design, our words follow a style guide to keep in line with spelling and grammar, and when edited well, have brevity and rhythm. In news reporting, an information architecture is taught early on in journalism school, an economic order that provides a structure so that the words the writer chooses represent the most meaning. Read more

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Oink-oink, big court victory for undercover videos

Good morning.

  1. Idaho judge strikes down ‘ag-gag’ law

    Shilling for the meat and dairy industries, the Idaho legislature passed a law that bans undercover agriculture videos for journalistic purposes. The aim of the videos is to expose animal abuse. The chief federal judge there (a Harvard Law grad and Bill Clinton appointee) "swept away the state's ban on the grounds that the law violated the 1st Amendment and selectively targeted activists or journalists who might be critical of factory farm practices." (Los Angeles Times) Inexpensive technology has made such covert videography, once a staple of broadcasters, now a favorite of animal rights activists. So give Judge B. Lynn Winmill a Bard of Boise Award for noting "The remedy for misleading speech, or speech we do not like, is more speech, not enforced silence." And unlike the two-legged media animals who covered the Koch Brothers donors conference over the weekend, media snooping here won't need permission from the animals to note their presence.

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Career Beat: Jesse Pesta named enterprise editor at The New York Times

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Jesse Pesta is now an enterprise editor on The New York Times business desk. Previously, he was editor for investigative and enterprise projects at The Wall Street Journal. (The New York Times Company)
  • Stuart Miller is now head of news at BuzzFeed UK. Previously, he was head of news at The Guardian. (Poynter)
  • Corby Kummer is now a contributing editor at The New Republic. He is a senior editor for The Atlantic. (Email)

Job of the day: Vox is looking for a Snapchat senior editor. Get your resumes in! (Mediagazer)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Tuesday, Aug. 04, 2015

Here are 4 of our favorite Jon Stewart media moments

Perhaps no actual journalist has been accorded the kind of public adulation that has preceded this week’s exit of fake newsman Jon Stewart.

New Yorker Editor David Remnick weighed in, deploying elevated language to describe Stewart in terms that would probably make the comedian bristle. Jake Tapper, host of CNN’s “State of the Union,” spent nearly five minutes on a report examining his impact. The Boston Globe used terms like “brilliant,” “savvy” and “damning” in a retrospective on Stewart’s legacy.

But the praise isn’t just for yuks. By satirizing the news and holding both politicians and journalists to account for their words, Stewart and his staff became incisive traffic cops whenever they spotted hypocrisy, laziness or inanity.

That’s why more such tributes will undoubtably follow before the week is up — including this one, from reporters and faculty members at Poynter. Read more

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A man shows his support of the strike by employees at the Hyatt Hotel on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, Calif., Thursday, June 9, 2005.  (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

Journalists and hotel housekeepers: Why both need a union

Does a 20-something middle-class, college-educated online journalist have anything in the world in common with a hotel housekeeper, casino cocktail waitress or a seamstress in a clothing factory?

D. Taylor, president of one of the nation’s biggest unions, thinks so, which suggests why he believes unionization is an obvious route for many reporters and editors.

“The idea of people coming together and getting something better has never gone out of style,” he says. “You don’t fight a war with an individual soldier.”

Taylor (whose given name is Donald) is president of the 270,000-member UNITE HERE, a combination of seminal labor organizations with hallowed, and at times rancorous, histories. It doesn’t represent journalists, and has no plans to ever do so. But he’s cognizant of recent organizing victories by other unions at Gawker Media, Salon and the Guardian. Read more

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The New York Times goes native with video advertising

The New York Times. (AP Photo)

The New York Times. (AP Photo)

The New York Times plans to introduce a video version of native advertising this fall, tailored to smartphone display and with presentation formats targeted to specific times of the day.

The new offering goes by the slightly highfalutin label “Mobile Moments.” According a Times news release this morning, the commercial content will emphasize storytelling, often with an entertaining or inspiring component. These will be produced either by advertisers themselves or by the same 40-person T Brand Studio that already does text-based native ads (which the Times call “paid posts”).

Sebastian Tomich, senior vice president of advertising and innovation, who runs the Times native advertising effort, told Ad Age the new format (which will include variants like graphics or interactives) is an antidote to irritating and not very effective interstitial banners that display poorly on smartphones. Read more

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Today’s front page of the day: ‘Justicia’

Tuesday’s front page of the day comes from Chicago’s Hoy, which led with calls for a transparent investigation into the death of Mexican photojournalist Rubén Espinosa. Espinosa was found murdered along with four other people.

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The Committee to Protect Journalists reports that Espinosa was found murdered in Mexico City on Friday after leaving Veracruz.

Veracruz is one of the most dangerous states for the press in Mexico, according to CPJ research. Four journalists have been killed in Veracruz in direct relation to their work since 2011, according to CPJ research. Seven other journalists were killed in unclear circumstances and at least three journalists have disappeared in the state in the same time period.

For the Christian Science Monitor, Whitney Eulich wrote about Espinosa’s murder and the dangers facing Mexican journalists. Read more

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Former Guardian head of news joins BuzzFeed

Press Gazette

Make that two Guardian staffers who have followed former Guardian.com Editor-in-Chief Janine Gibson out the door.

Stuart Miller, who was previously head of news at The Guardian, is joining BuzzFeed to lead its UK news operation, British media outlet Press Gazette reported Tuesday.

In a comment to Press Gazette, BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith hailed Miller as “one of the world’s great news editors” and noted that BuzzFeed was planning to further expand its presence in the UK.

Stuart is one of the world’s great news editors. Janine, Luke [Lewis, executive editor of Buzzfeed UK] and I are thrilled to have him head up our news operation in Britain as we continue to build out our editorial team.

The departure of some top talent from The Guardian comes after months of intrigue surrounding the replacement of former Editor-in-Chief Alan Rusbridger. Read more

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From Mashable's 'Raqqa: An Inside Story.'

How Mashable took user-generated content to create an animated story about Syria

From Mashable's 'Raqqa: An Inside Story.'

From Mashable’s ‘Raqqa: An Inside Story.’

When Louise Roug first saw the storyboards for Mashable’s animation on a city in Syria, they were just rough outlines. Then the animators started filling in the color.

“That’s when I completely recognized parts of Syria that I’ve been to,” said Roug, Mashable’s global news editor.

On Tuesday, Mashable published “Raqqa: An Inside Story.” The project includes a longform piece and an animation (with an Arabic translation) that were created with verified user-generated content. Both tell the story of one young Syrian man and how his life and the life of Raqqa changed as ISIS took over.

Roug, who worked as a war correspondent and lived in Baghdad from 2004 to 2007, also reported from Syria. She knows how difficult and dangerous the country has become for journalists. Read more

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Eat cereal, and other tips on creativity from Snapchat superstar Shonduras

Snapchat celebrity Shonduras

Snapchat celebrity Shonduras says anyone in a creative industry should involve the audience as often as possible. (Screen shot)

When it comes to social media platforms, Snapchat users might be stuck with the most limitations. Most famous for its (supposedly) self-destructing messages, Snapchat limits videos to 10 seconds, text to 31 characters and offers only rudimentary tools for users to draw images.

But Snapchat celebrity Shaun McBride, known as Shonduras to his followers, says Snapchat’s limitations foster creativity rather than restrict it.

Hundreds of thousands of Snapchat users have tuned in to watch McBride, a 28-year-old Utah native, gorge on massive bowls of cereal, pretend each of his many airline flights is his first or perform skateboarding tricks with his luggage.

McBride’s creativity and cheerfulness have built a massive and devoted fanbase and sizable earnings through branded stories. Read more

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The New York Times’ grandpa jeans problem

Good morning.

  1. Marketing veep tweets (what else?) his take

    Max Pfennighaus, the executive creative director of brand and marketing for The New York Times, was atwitter tweeting Monday. He wrote of the challenge of going digital when you've been around a long time and fetching a new audience while keeping the old. And, being a marketing guy, he cited "our core brand challenge," which elicited his mention of grandpas and strip clubs. OK, he actually said nightclubs (he does work for The Times). Relevance, he said, is his problem, not awareness. Still, we do hope, as Max does, that the paper keeps getting down and nerdy with apps, even if it must dispense with grandpa jeans in challenging the core conundrum. (NiemanLab)

  2. Like a Ronda Rousey mismatch, Stewart takes down Kurtz

    The shift of former CNN-Washington Post media critic Howard Kurtz to Fox News has brought some seeming re-tailoring of his world view, which at times appears to seamlessly fit (perhaps coincidentally) his employer's ideological thrust.

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Career Beat: Brian Madigan named photo director at BuzzFeed Life

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Brian Madigan is now photo director at BuzzFeed Life. Previously, he was deputy photo editor at Real Simple magazine. Annie Daly is now BuzzFeed Life’s travel editor. Previously, she was a freelance editor at Yahoo Travel. (Email)
  • Elizabeth Anne Shaw has been named Editor-in-Chief of FamilyFun magazine. Previously, she was integrated content director at Scholastic Parent and Child. (Email)
  • Alice Rhee is leaving The Washington Post to start a digital media consulting firm. She was a senior producer there. (Email)
  • Sarah Spigelman Richter is now a food reporter at Mashable. Previously, she was a community manager at Tastemade. (Email)
  • Dan Shea will be publisher at the Advocate. He is president there. (Advocate)
  • Jarrod Dicker is now director of ad product and engineering at The Washington Post.
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Monday, Aug. 03, 2015

Photo by Heather Phillips/Flickr

A list of every hidden journalism-related social media group I could find

I’m overwhelmed by the number of different platforms that journalists use to share information, tips and job notices with each other. There are conferences and symposiums, not to mention Facebook groups and Slack channels and Twitter chats and listservs.

I prefer Twitter to the other mediums: it’s open and accessible. In order to participate in a closed Facebook group or Slack channel or listserv, you have to know that they exist in the first place — which excludes people who are not well-connected to already-existing circles of journalists.

I’m a big fan of getting new voices into journalism and keeping them there. One of the ways to help level the existing playing field is to make sure everyone knows about the groups that already exist. Many of these groups are not well-advertised and are hard to find, particularly if you’re a freelancer or new to the field. Read more

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Meet the 17-year-old who breaks cybersecurity news

William Turton was transcribing interviews at The Daily Dot office when he got information that Planned Parenthood’s website had been hacked. It was 8:22 p.m. on a Sunday evening. He started reporting. Around six hours later, he got another tip that New York Magazine’s website was facing a cyber attack. He jumped on that as well. Sitting in an empty workspace, Turton had kept the lights off so that he could manage his headache. He went on to report on both the stories into the night and published them at 8 a.m. that morning. He was the first one to get the news out. Turton covers politics and hacking for The Daily Dot. He is also a 17-year-old high school student.

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William Turton at the Daily Dot office.

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