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AP considering legal action over Clinton emails

The Associated Press | The New York Times

The Associated Press is considering legal action against the State Department “for failing to turn over some emails covering Clinton’s tenure,” Jack Gillum and Ted Bridis wrote for The Associated Press Wednesday.

The threat comes amid allegations that Clinton used a private email account linked to a server in her New York home to duck public records requests from news organizations including Gawker and The AP.

The private email account and associated personal server would have given Clinton additional legal latitude if she was asked to turn over her correspondence, according to The AP:

Operating her own server would have afforded Clinton additional legal opportunities to block government or private subpoenas in criminal, administrative or civil cases because her lawyers could object in court before being forced to turn over any emails.

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Weak Tribune Publishing and Scripps earnings make the case for spinning off newspapers

Tribune Publishing and E.W. Scripps this morning reported disappointing fourth quarter revenues from newspaper operations, matching the pattern established by other public companies.

At the same time, the results suggested some of the logic behind divorcing newspapers from broadcast, as Tribune Publishing did seven months ago and Scripps plans for this April.

tribune-logo-300Continuing the tone he struck in the company’s first earnings conference call with analysts, CEO Jack Griffin said “we’re playing catch-up” on a number of key initiatives to strengthen the business.

For instance, Tribune Publishing as a Tribune division had made only a minimal effort to register print subscribers as digital users, he said.  Now 659,000 of those are counted as paying for digital access and Tribune Publishing has more than 60,000 digital-only paid subscribers. Read more

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Andy Lack leaves post at Broadcasting Board of Governors

Andy Lack, the former NBC executive rumored to be considering a return to the network, has stepped down from his position as CEO and director of the Broadcasting Board of Governors, the agency announced Wednesday.

The Broadcasting Board of Governors announced today that CEO and Director Andrew Lack will be departing the agency. The agency will now begin work to attract an equally talented executive to help continue to transform our agency.

Lack did not specify a reason for his departure, but he will be in next week to explain his decision, a spokesperson for the Broadcasting Board of Governors told Poynter.

News of Lack’s departure tracks with reports that he’s angling for “a top job” at NBC, perhaps as chairman of NBC News Group, as Politico’s Dylan Byers reported Tuesday. Read more

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AP will use software to write NCAA game stories

Automated Insights, a company that provides language generation software to The Associated Press and other organizations, announced Wednesday the news cooperative will use the software to produce thousands of stories about collegiate sports.

The Associated Press will begin publishing automatically generated sports stories this spring, beginning with Division I baseball, according to a press release.

This new partnership will allow AP to cover more college sports of interest to our members and their audiences,” said Barry Bedlan, AP’s deputy director of sports products. “This will mean thousands of more stories on the AP wire, which will remain unmatched in the industry. Every college sports town will have some level of coverage.

The Associated Press has been using Automated Insights software to generate earnings reports stories since July. Read more

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Providence Journal denies accusations of plagiarism

The Providence Journal has denied allegations made by a local news site that it cribbed language from area TV station WPRI, telling Poynter the paper has a news partnership that allows it to share content with the station.

The denial comes in response to Read more

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Why more of Hillary Clinton’s emails haven’t turned up in public records requests

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Clintonemail.com

    Hillary Clinton's private email account used its own server, which is based in her family's New York home, The Associated Press reported on Tuesday. "Operating her own server would have afforded Clinton additional legal opportunities to block government or private subpoenas in criminal, administrative or civil cases because her lawyers could object in court before being forced to turn over any emails." The AP, like many other news organizations, has submitted public records requests in the last year for Clinton's emails from the State Department, "although the agency has never suggested that it didn't possess all her emails." (The Associated Press) | "...An examination of records requests sent to the department reveals how the practice protected a significant amount of her correspondence from the eyes of investigators and the public." (The New York Times) | "The use of private email addresses may explain the State Department’s puzzling response to several FOIA requests filed by Gawker in the past two years." (Gawker) | The Sunlight Foundation has five questions about Clinton's private email, including "What other damage has been done?" (Sunlight Foundation) | Vox has seven questions and answers about the whole mess, including that Colin Powell used personal email during his time as Secretary of State, although the "rules about retaining records of personal emails were somewhat more ambiguous." (Vox)

  2. Israeli media on Netanyahu's speech in Washington

    Politicians and media organizations had a lot to say about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress.

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Career Beat: Lisa Arbetter named editor of StyleWatch

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Lisa Arbetter will be editor of StyleWatch. Previously, she was deputy editor of InStyle. (Time Inc.)
  • Jill Geisler has been named Loyola University’s Bill Plante Chair of Leadership and Media Integrity. She was a faculty member at Poynter for 16 years. (Poynter)
  • Anna Dickson will be deputy director of photography at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was photography director at The Huffington Post. (Mediabistro)
  • Eliot Pierce is now chief product officer at The New Republic. Previously, he was a consultant. (Poynter)

Job of the day: The Tampa Bay Times is looking for a general assignment reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Today in Media History: 1933 news coverage of FDR’s first inauguration

On March 4, 1933, the news media described Franklin Roosevelt’s first presidential inauguration.

Front page news from Oregon’s Capital Journal:

Image-CJ

His inaugural speech is remembered for the words: “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself…”

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Here is newsreel footage of the famous quote:

“…on March 4, 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt was inaugurated as President of the United States for the first time. As he approached the rostrum to take the oath of office at the Capitol, he braced himself on his son James’s arm. Breaking precedent, he recited the entire oath, instead of simply repeating ‘I do.’ Then, as the crowd grew quiet, he opened his inaugural address.

The new President was addressing a nation that was struggling amidst the greatest economic depression in its history.

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Tuesday, Mar. 03, 2015

Spin off of E.W. Scripps newspapers likely to happen in April

“For the first time in 130 years we will not own newspapers,” said Chip Mahaney, Senior Director, Local Operations at The E. W. Scripps CompanyMahaney discussed the future of E.W.Scripps after it spins off its newspapers into a separate company run by the Journal Media Group.

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Jill Geisler joins Loyola University

Jill Geisler (submitted photo)

Jill Geisler (submitted photo)

Jill Geisler is Loyola University’s first Bill Plante Chair of Leadership and Media Integrity, according to a news release from the university. Geisler, who worked at Poynter as a faculty member for 16 years, now writes a column for the Columbia Journalism Review and regularly coaches journalists in newsrooms around the country. She’s also the author of “Work Happy: What Great Bosses Know.”

From the release:

According to Geisler, “Three things made this opportunity irresistible: The School of Communication’s focus on media integrity in the digital age, the chance to integrate leadership skills and values into an already strong curriculum, and Loyola’s commitment to social justice. Even as I continue to coach managers in media organizations, I’ll be helping grow tomorrow’s leaders in Loyola’s classrooms.”

Also in the release, Dean Don Heider said that the school is delighted that Geisler is joining them. Read more

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In a video, Michigan Daily staff read some ‘unflattering responses from our readers’

College Media Matters

Staff at the Michigan Daily read some of the reader comments, emails and tweets they get in a new video, Dan Reimold reported Tuesday in College Media Matters. Reimold spoke with Victoria Noble, a columnist and videographer, about why staff created the video.

“…This was meant to add humor to a situation that tends to get people really upset and strains the relationship between writers and readers. We were trying to take a more personal look at how people react to our content and how writers take in those reactions. It’s a more serious topic, but we’re not covering it like ‘This is what you should do’ or ‘This is what you shouldn’t do.’ Comedy is involved, but the point is not to be funny.

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15 political clichés journalists should avoid

Spelling
The New York Times | The Associated Press | The Washington Post

Politico’s Mike Allen, founder of the influential Beltway tipsheet “Playbook,” once wrote that those who write in clichés are probably thinking in clichés, too. As news organizations prepare to cover the 2016 election, here are some hackneyed words and phrases they should consider leaving off the campaign bus:

New York Times standards editor Philip Corbett weighed in Tuesday with a list of well-worn words that sneak into The Times’ coverage:
“I can project with confidence that we will see far too many uses of “optics,” “narrative,” “pivot,” “war chest” and “coffers” in the months between now and November 2016.”

A 2012 election style guide from The Associated Press offers a litany of stale verbiage. Read more

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The New Republic hires Eliot Pierce as chief product officer

The New Republic announced the hiring of its first chief product officer Tuesday, the most recent step in an attempt to transform a century-old magazine into a digital media company.

Eliot Pierce, who has worked as a consultant and as a vice president at The New York Times, will begin as chief product officer March 9, New Republic Chief Executive Officer Guy Vidra announced in a memo to staff.

In his new role, Pierce will oversee the company’s product strategy to create “the most compelling experiences for our journalism,” Vidra writes. He will work with the editorial and business sides and lead the magazine’s product and engineering teams.

Before coming to The New Republic, Pierce spent several years at The New York Times, where he worked as product manager, director of product management and development and vice president of strategy, business development and ad operations. Read more

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World Press Photo clarifies: It doesn’t approve of photo staging

Good morning. Here are nine media stories.

  1. It also found ‘no grounds for doubting the photographer’s integrity’

    On Sunday, the World Press Photo contest said it investigated complaints from the mayor of Charleroi, Belgium about possible staging of images in Giovanni Troilo's winning entry. World Press Photo said it found nothing wrong with Troilo's work. In that release, it included a line that many found upsetting. "The contest requires photojournalists do not stage pictures to show something that would otherwise have not taken place.” On Monday, World Press Photo clarified: "The last part of the sentence aims to define what we mean by staging; it does not aim to define an exception to a rule. Staging is defined as something that would not have happened without the photographer’s involvement.

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Career Beat: ‘Mary Sue’ founder Susana Polo is Polygon’s entertainment editor

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Susana Polo is now entertainment editor at Polygon. She founded “The Mary Sue.” (Email)
  • Dan Rubinstein will be the home and design editor of Departures. Previously, he was editor-in-chief of Surface magazine. (Email)
  • Gabe Ramirez is now a senior producer at CNN Politics Digital. Previously, he was a multimedia photojournalist and producer at CNN. Alysha Love will be deputy multi-platform editor at CNN Politics Digital. Previously, she was a Web editor at Politico. (Email)
  • Nick Brien is now president of Hearst Magazines Marketing Services and CEO of iCrossing. Previously, he was CEO of McCann Worldgroup. (Email)
  • Jeff Zeleny will be senior Washington correspondent for CNN’s Washington bureau. Previously, he was senior Washington correspondent for ABC News.
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