9 reasons to switch from Drupal to WordPress

Here’s an aphorism for journalists embarking on Web projects: The CMS is the message.

Yes, your content matters, but so does your choice of a content-management system (CMS). This choice can influence everything from how often you and your staff post stories to how much time — and money — you’ll need to spend wrangling bug fixes, compatibility issues and design snafus. Choose a CMS that’s a wrong fit, and you’ll regret it.

I learned this the hard way.

For the past 14 years (yes, quite a while in Internet-time), I’ve run a website, Web100, that’s a curated look at the best of the Web. About three years ago, I decided to transition the site to a CMS from a version I’d hand-coded in HTML years earlier. I chose Drupal as the CMS, hired a top-notch Drupal development firm (not cheap, by any means), and attended DrupalCon and Drupal meetups to learn enough to manage Web100 on my own.

But Drupal, for all of its wonders, was just too much for me to handle; even Drupal pros lose track of themselves in its powerful vastness. So earlier this year, I pretty much rebuilt Web100 on my own using WordPress, and I haven’t looked back.

Switching from Drupal to WordPress means giving up certain features and functionality, but those things don’t matter much if you don’t know how to maintain and manage your website, or add improvements, without jumping through techno-hoops.

Are you mulling what CMS to use for a journalistic venture? Here are nine reasons to opt for WordPress instead of Drupal.

WordPress is far less complicated than Drupal.

This is the uber-reason to choose WordPress over Drupal. Without having much of a technical background, a lone journalist (or a team of journalist-entrepreneurs) can build and maintain a self-hosted WordPress website with an impressive design — and even add new features as the project evolves.

That’s not possible with Drupal unless you’re willing to delve deep into Drupal and immerse yourself in it. If that’s your choice, then you’ll probably be doing a lot more technical work than you anticipated, as opposed to focusing on your publication’s editorial voice, story development and whatever else motivated you to pursue the venture.

Software and plugins are easy to update.

WordPress updates couldn’t be simpler: With a couple of quick clicks from the admin interface, I can update both the WordPress software and plugins. Though the latest version of Drupal (Drupal 7) makes it easier to update Drupal modules, it’s not as easy as it is with WordPress. Also, updating Drupal “core” requires technical know-how beyond the comfort level of many tech-adept journalists; I never tried it on my own. What’s more, a switch from one version of Drupal to another — Drupal 6 to Drupal 7, for instance — is typically a major project, and it may require a wholesale rebuilding of your website.

Plugins are made for writers, not PHP pros.

Because of WordPress’s roots as a blogging platform, WordPress plugins often seem like they’re made for writers, rather than for PHP pros. They’re typically easy to install and operate, with obvious-enough controls and documentation. Not so with Drupal, partly because module developers assume a technical expert will be installing and configuring the module. (Even Drupal pros stumble around modules’ controls figuring out what does what.)

Plugins and modules provide key aspects of a CMS’s functionality, and if you need to reach out to a technical expert every time you want to adjust one, your operation will be a lot less nimble.

Widgets are design-friendly.

WordPress widgets provide a quick way to customize your site by adding specialized items (an e-newsletter signup, a Twitter feed and so on) to “widgetized” regions of your theme. They’re extremely simple to use, with a drag and drop interface, and they often look great on the page, smartly inheriting styles from elsewhere in your theme — or even providing customized design controls from within the widget. Drupal makes it harder for non-technical folks (or those with just CSS know-how) to customize a website.

Admin screens are less cockpit-like.

You could spend a lifetime configuring Drupal. If you want choices for everything, and revel in figuring out what clicking this or that radio button might mean, then Drupal is for you. To be sure, the WordPress admin interface can be intimidating, if you’re not familiar with it (or if you’re a fan of the minimalist joys of posting from Tumblr), but at least it’s sensibly streamlined and simple to tailor to your needs.

Numerous themes allow for customization.

Commercial theme development for WordPress is a thriving business that has real benefits for cash-strapped news organizations, as well as journalists embarking on solo projects. Top-quality themes, like those from DIYthemes and WooThemes, provide advanced functionality, support communities and allow for genuine customization — even as you’re relying on the theme’s developers to test browser compatibility, provide SEO tools and upgrade the theme to jive with the latest version of WordPress.

There are plenty of ways to get answers to WordPress-related questions.

The welcoming gurus in the Drupal crowd often assume you know your stuff or that you want to learn how to dig deep into Drupal. I loved that — until I hated it. That’s because I’d rather be treated like an idiot who’s in dire need of help. There are lots of us at WordPress events and forums, so when you seek assistance (as I have at the WooThemes forums and WP Questions), there’s an understanding that you may just want to solve your woes and not peruse PHP. I like that. It’s easier for me to get help as I noodle around for a solution.

WordPress makes it easy to experiment.

With so many choices and so much to configure, I never could get comfortable experimenting with Drupal. I always felt like I was on the verge of breaking something or corrupting the database. I’m a lot more intrepid with WordPress, and I love the chance to experiment.

Are there hazards in this? Sure. Too much unbridled experimentation, especially by those without design or technical skills, will inevitably lead your site to look like a mess (or cause it to stop running entirely). I sometimes miss the built-in way Drupal lets you fine-tune privileges for every type of user imaginable.

WordCamp community is open, inviting.

Last but not least, there’s the community. I actually loved participating in the Drupal community, in part because it was fun hanging out with so many smart, creative coders. But that’s who participates in the community — programmers (or designers and others delving into Drupal’s innards).

The WordPress community is far more varied, with a real contingent interested in content development and journalism — and not just coding. I attended WordCamp NYC back in 2009, and I was stunned by the number of sessions led by editors and writers. These were my people, and WordPress was home. It just took a circuitous route for me to get there.

Disagree with any of these points? Tell us in the comments section whether you prefer Drupal or WordPress and why. (Poynter.org uses both WordPress and Drupal.)

This story is part of a new Poynter Hacks/Hackers series. Each week, we’ll feature a How To focused on what journalists can learn from emerging trends in technology and new tech tools.

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  • http://twitter.com/JayCollier Jay Collier

    http://vip.wordpress.com/clients/

    CNN
    LA Times
    New York Times
    NBC
    Harvard

  • http://twitter.com/JayCollier Jay Collier

    You said: “Suppose you want to build a community site for a city, that has review articles (both from staff and user submitted), a business directory, classified section, etc.  You will be hard pressed to do this with WordPress.”

    Have you actually tried doing that with WordPress, or are you just making a guess? Just as you need modules for most of those functions in Drupal, you use plugins with WordPress, and there are solid WP plugins available for those things.

  • http://twitter.com/JayCollier Jay Collier

    Not so boring when your business depends on making the right decision.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000098327336 AiEi Ngôi Nhà Nhỏ

    i also love WordPress too. It spent me just a few days to understand, but drupal is a month! And also i can design theme very easy. My site is an example http://dunkare.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mario-Peshev/1292769853 Mario Peshev

    @facebook-533096164:disqus - I’d disagree on the fact that most plugins are out of date. I’ve used hundreds of them and probably like 2 to 5 percent of the plugins were not usable (and only some part of them – not supported by the newset version of the platform).

    Basically you can’t contradict with the fact that WordPress has far more plugins and themes with a functional embedded behavior than Drupal. So it makes it easier and faster for developers to use something from the repo and even if it is not working exactly the right way, it could be modified rather than written from scratch (somewhere this is applicable too).
    So the more the options, the better the chance a project could be delivered in less time, same quality.

    P.S. Don’t overuse CCK and Views in Drupal. They are awesome, but WP has some similar plugins too – not as good, but close to that. 

  • http://about.me/mikeschinkel MikeSchinkel
  • http://cheekymonkeymedia.ca Rick Bjarnason

    This is very interesting, my team works exclusively with both these two CMS,  and you are right in that they are vastly different beasts. One thing I would like to point out, is that yes for many managing a Drupal site is too complicated, but it can also be argued that managing a WordPress site is too easy.. what I mean by this is many people “experiment” without the proper safety nets in place and cause themselves a lot of unnecessary grief.

  • Anonymous

    thanks

  • http://ottodestruct.com Otto

    I’m glad you like WordPress! We always try to keep the “user” in mind when developing features and similar. Ease of use and enabling publishing for everybody, no matter their technical expertise level, are a couple of the primary goals of the WordPress core development team.

    FWIW, there is also a vibrant developer community around WordPress as well, if you want to delve a bit deeper into the “code” aspect of it. PHP Pros are welcome too. :)

  • http://eggiweg.me alekth

    Certainly, as many have pointed out WP seems to be indeed the tool you were looking for to start with.

    But really, if you never dared updating drupal core yourself, it would have made a lot more sense to either switch platform a long time ago or hire somebody else to take care of the technical tasks at the site.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for writing this, Allan. Picking the right CMS and configuring it properly is crucial, the bedrock upon which all your organization’s future stories will be told. I’m a fan of both WordPress and Drupal, but for different reasons. I can’t speak to WordPress.org (that’s the one you host yourself,) but WordPress.com allowed me to craft a quick, simple website for the New Hampshire Press Association last year. We love it for all the reasons you mention: the speed, the user interface, the many themes.

    As for Drupal, the Concord (NH) Monitor launched a Drupal site about two years ago. It’s been a powerful laboratory that’s allowed us to experiment with what digital tools best serve our readers. Our biggest success has been with social media integration. Drupal is rather agnostic when it comes to content types, so we’ve been able to apply our taxonomy to tweets, links, etc and use views to curate some interesting feeds. It’s really changed the way we break news.

    Of course, none of this would have been possible without a brilliant programmer.

  • http://www.allanhoffman.com Allan Hoffman

    Good points, Tony.

    I would just add: It’s important to think beyond what’s best for building a site, but also think about what platform may be best for maintaining a site and fostering its use and evolution, given budgets, staff, etc.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tonylegrone Tony Legrone

    As a side-note. I hope I’m not coming across as a wordpress hater. It’s not that at all. I believe that each system is suited for specific needs and it’s important to study a sites requirement to decide what to use to build it in. Even drupal.org recommends using wordpress over drupal if you need a fully featured blogging site.

    I think the drupal and wordpress should coexist happily together. Unfortunately, there’s fanboys on both sides that will fight to the death over what to use at the detriment to the client.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tonylegrone Tony Legrone

    I’ve seen both systems implemented in horrendous ways that take FOREVER to load.

    WordPress does have a MUCH smaller footprint and it drupal does require more server resources, but I disagree with your opinion that wordpress has better optimization tools.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tonylegrone Tony Legrone

    That’s understandable. It took me me a a few weeks to understand how to really build a good view, and months to really understand what views were doing. It’s a very powerful and complicated tool. I’ve also rebuilt sites that were attempted in drupal by people who didn’t realize how hard it is to build and maintain a drupal site. I couldn’t reuse any of their code because, once you start going the wrong direction in drupal, it’s very hard to steer it back.

    I’ve gotten to the point where it’s easier for me to build a site in drupal but, when we turn a site over to the client, I don’t give them access to manage views.

    I just took a look at your site and it’s very nice. I’ve never seen it before now so I don’t know what changes you made, but it looks like the perfect use of wordpress. I don’t see any features that would lead me to think it could’ve been executed any better in drupal. I don’t envy the task of migrating all your content :)

  • Anonymous

    You are so lame and proud of it !

  • http://www.facebook.com/DylanRSmith Dylan Smith

    If you want a basic blog, WordPress may suffice. If you are running a real news organization, get a real CMS: ExpressionEngine.

  • Anonymous

    You make a good point. Correlation is frequently not “cause-and-effect”. Another issue is that they were trying to roll this site out in a “big bang” — which means failure of any of a number of efforts could have crippled the roll-out. 

    I’m personally a big fan of several small releases, learning as you go :)

  • http://www.allanhoffman.com Allan Hoffman

    I have heard similar stories, frankly. In fact, my Drupal experience (with a development company) was quite good. But in talking to others who’d contracted to create Drupal sites, I heard quite a few stories of how things went awry. That said, I know that happens with all types of technology project — it’s just that with WordPress, you’re really forced, in many ways, to streamline and simplify, and that’s one of the great things about it.

  • http://www.allanhoffman.com Allan Hoffman

    Actually, in a lot of ways, Drupal was really suited to Web100 when I made the switch from static HTML to Drupal. In fact, developers (or others at Drupal events) often noted that it was an ideal site for Drupal, in part because of Drupal’s built-in ability to mash together content in so many amazing ways with the use of Views.

    And I loved that — or, I should say, I loved the *idea* of it.

    But it turned out to be a lot more of a challenge to actually make use of Views (and the other amazing features of Drupal) without either (a) dedicated much of my time to learning Drupal, or (b) having a dedicated/reliable staff member or consultant to work with me. I sort of tried both. I had an excellent consultant I’d met at  DrupalCon DC, but he had other obligations, too, and so Web100 often took a back seat…

    I guess part of what I’m trying to say — via what is my own experience (and not relevant to every single situation) — is that many people underestimate Drupal’s complexity and what it will really take to keep a Drupal site going, esp. if it’s a Drupal site for news/journalism with the need/desire to be very nimble and quick about making changes, adding new features, etc.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tonylegrone Tony Legrone

    I was about to write this same comment.

    Being a drupal developer, I mostly agree with each point. It is a very powerful system and, if you only meant to write a blog, it’s more than you need. The drupal community is very technical and, I would say, intimidating if you’re not aspiring to be a developer yourself.

    I also agree with cwgmpls that the title of your post doesn’t match up with the content. It implies that wordpress could be used in any case, but you content clearly shows that drupal was way more than you needed and not necessarily a platform to avoid.

    WordPress is certainly easier to understand if you’re not a developer. However, as a developer, I find that wordpress plugins are more often out of date than not. And there’s no system in place to handle  support for plugins. WordPress core has incredible documentation that has never failed me, but if I have problems with a plugin it means fixing it myself or finding a way to contact the developer.

  • Anonymous

    Boy – a lot of push-back comments.  Allen – for my customers, small business (sometimes very small – 1 to 6 people), Drupal just isn’t very practical from either a financial or a support standpoint.  Drupal development tends to be pricey. If I get run over by a bus, it’s a slam dunk for them to find another WordPress developer.  BTW, late last year I lost a job to a Drupal outfit. Deadline to go live was February 2011. Seven months later, there is still no site. Hard to say why — communication, desire to do a monolithic deployment …perhaps, but I’m guessing Drupal’s complexity is a factor.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, as impressive as GigaOm and AllThingsD are in terms of traffic, they are still fundamentally reverse-chronological publishing sites with traditional commenting. Those sites don’t have many requirements for the “community plumbing” that Drupal has at its core.

    I used Drupal back in 2004 (!) to build a project with students, and it was so generically powerful as to be overwhelming, with a vocabulary only a engineer could love (taxonomy, nodes, et al). But you could see that out of the box, a site like Digg or DailyKOS could be built in a straightforward manner on Drupal. It wasn’t drag-and-drop simple and the performance characteristics were sluggish. Even so, that was pretty revolutionary back then, and even with WordPress’s remarkable evolution it is still unnatural and awkward for WP to do the same.

    A writeup on the site, which is now nonexistent:http://www.cyberjournalist.net/chatter-garden-new-hong-kong-online-community-news-site/

  • Anonymous

    Beatles/Stones, Brady/Manning, Superman/Batman, Drupal/WordPress.  Boring.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jcabot Jordi Cabot

    For those (like me, after two years I moved from Drupal to WordPress some months ago) that agree and want to make the change, please check this website for help: http://migratetowp.com

  • Anonymous

    FYI, my recent comparison of Drupal, Joomla and WordPress in the J-school setting may be useful for those interested in this. 

    http://www.andrewlih.com/blog/2011/09/07/choosing-a-content-management-system-in-2011/

  • Anonymous

    Allan, you refuted my comment, then ended up in agreement with it. WordPress is a great tool.  Drupal is a great tool.  But, they serve different objectives and have some overlap.  I agree you need to carefully evaluate your needs and goals.  The fact you overlook this aspect is why I said your article is simplistic.

    As far as end user simplicity goes, I agree it is important.  This is why I explicitly stated you need a good developer who knows how to turn off the right options and features so as to remove confusion for the end user.

    If you just want a blog, you will spend most of your time tweaking drupal to behaves  more like wordpress.  If you are trying to build a community site with lots unique features you will love the flexibility drupal gives.

     

  • Anonymous

    Allan, you refuted my comment, then ended up in agreement with it. WordPress is a great tool.  Drupal is a great tool.  But, they serve different objectives and have some overlap.  I agree you need to carefully evaluate your needs and goals.  The fact you overlook this aspect is why I said your article is simplistic.

    As far as end user simplicity goes, I agree it is important.  This is why I explicitly stated you need a good developer who knows how to turn off the right options and features so as to remove confusion for the end user.

    If you just want a blog, you will spend most of your time tweaking drupal to behaves  more like wordpress.  If you are trying to build a community site with lots unique features you will love the flexibility drupal gives.

     

  • http://www.allanhoffman.com Allan Hoffman

    I actually delved pretty deep into Drupal — I even led a session at a DrupalCamp in Philadelphia. I’m fairly tech-savvy, for a journalist, too. But there’s a big difference between learning enough of WordPress to make things sing for you, and doing the same with Drupal. As I mention — even Drupal pros get lost in its admin menus.

    Yes, in its admin menus! I had Drupal tutorials, with a real pro (working fulltime for a major company using Drupal), and I saw upfront how easy it was, even for him, to get lost in Drupal. 

    Certainly Drupal 7 has remedied some of that, but it’s still an obstacle for many people — even experienced PHP programmers.

  • http://www.allanhoffman.com Allan Hoffman

    Is my comparison simplistic? Maybe it is, but I think simplicity is part of the issue here. Publications often need to be nimble and fast, and complexity in the technology — and the need to go to hardcore experts for every adjustment — can really slow things down. That said, I really do agree that WordPress isn’t the tool for every job — far from it — and you need to think hard and evaluate what you want/need.

  • http://www.allanhoffman.com Allan Hoffman

    Is my comparison simplistic? Maybe it is, but I think simplicity is part of the issue here. Publications often need to be nimble and fast, and complexity in the technology — and the need to go to hardcore experts for every adjustment — can really slow things down. That said, I really do agree that WordPress isn’t the tool for every job — far from it — and you need to think hard and evaluate what you want/need.

  • Anonymous

    I think the comparison is presenting an overly simplistic dichotomy of what people want and need.  Looking at your web100 site.  You wanted a polished blog platform. Great.  Wordpress is an amazing choice, at it is a shame that you got side tracked in Drupal. Others have more complex needs (e.g. the Whitehouse) will get much more out of Drupal. For example, suppose you want to build a community site for a city, that has review articles (both from staff and user submitted), a business directory, classified section, etc.  You will be hard pressed to do this with WordPress. 

    Its best to think of Drupal as a framework, than a completed product.  It really needs a competent developed to meet any particular use case.  This takes times and resources, but in the right hands is much faster than building from scratch.  Especially one who will take time to tweak the admin side UI removing unneeded options.Its best to think of wordpress as a polished platform for the blog type writing use case.  Its one of the best for this scenario.  And when its said and done it is probably easier to migrate from wordpress to drupal than drupal to wordpress, so if you are unsure start with wordpress.

    Your argument is like buying 4×4 truck because it might snow one week out of the year, then complaining that it sucks gas, is noisy and hard to park and that *everyone* should learn from you get a compact car.  However, someone on a farm with lots of un-maintained dirt roads will get great use out of a 4×4 truck and laugh at your suggestion.

  • http://twitter.com/DigitalDionne Dionne N. Walker

    “That’s not possible with Drupal unless you’re willing to delve deep into Drupal and immerse yourself in it.”

    Actually, I really disagree with this line of thought. Journalists need to stop being one dimensional – and no being able to write a bunch of different types of story is not multi-dimensional. We need to push ourselves to develop complementary skills; when said learning gets hard, try harder!

    Planning for a pending “Plan B” career outside of print, I went ahead and began learning a CMS a few months ago. I picked Joomla because I kept seeing it in ads. My first Joomla site took two weeks – and I’m still learning all the time – but it was well worth it: My website is far more flexible than what I’ve seen from the basic WordPress sites.

    Let’s be clear: I plan on learning WordPress and I definitely like certain clean elegance that’s intrinsic to WP themes. Indeed my site, http://www.digitaldionne.com, uses a template that’s a little WP-like. However, I have a site that’s flexible and won’t always have the taint of a blog on it. I could be underexposed, but it seems like nearly all WPs look like blogs, no matter how much fancy customization is done.

    Drupal is definitely considered a tech heavy CMS. But telling someone to go for the path of least resistance isn’t the answer. Learn, do tutorials, practice. You’ll gain a resume skill and may find yourself with a little side career –  I know I did!

  • Anonymous

    I am currently transitioning a small weekly newspaper site from WordPress to Drupal. Their primary beef with WordPress: control. A sister site was running Drupal but has since launched on Matchbin. We already had experience and resources from the old Drupal site so moving them over was not that much of a chore.

    I agree the learning curve with Drupal dwarfs that of WordPress, and we needed their site up immediately, so WP was the quickest solution.

    This is the biggie, however: I never expect journalists to touch code, widgets, or anything else for that matter. Content is completely separate from code and always should be. That may not be a realistic attitude in some shops, but a writer cannot serve two masters.

  • http://bangordailynews.com William P. Davis – BDN

    Not to stick my head in the troll’s den, but for the record WordPress actually has a much smaller footprint than Drupal. More than that, though, it’s all about how your server is configured at that point more than the CMS, though I believe very strongly that WordPress has much better tools to optimize your site than Drupal does.

  • http://bangordailynews.com William P. Davis – BDN

    Not to stick my head in the troll’s den, but for the record WordPress actually has a much smaller footprint than Drupal. More than that, though, it’s all about how your server is configured at that point more than the CMS, though I believe very strongly that WordPress has much better tools to optimize your site than Drupal does.

  • http://www.allanhoffman.com Allan Hoffman

    Well, I agree with you in some respects: There isn’t one tool that works for everything. And my intention wasn’t to get thousands of hits, but it was to spark some discussion, which I hope this will do. I really think Drupal is wonderful and suited to many projects. But even major websites are favoring WordPress for their blogs or even for entire publications.

    For years, The New York Observer was trotted out as a great example of a Drupal-powered website. Well, guess what. The Observer switched to WordPress:
    http://publisherblog.automattic.com/2011/06/17/ny-observer/

    Even when you’ve got a dedicated technical staff or money for consultants, using Drupal has a downside, largely because of its complexity.

  • Anonymous

    “But for writing and publishing on the web, WordPress is the current champ.”  Fair enough.  But one person “writing and publishing on the web” was not what Drupal was ever intended to do.  Drupal is first and foremost an online community-building tool.

  • http://twitter.com/cyberswat cyberswat

    1 reason to switch from wordpress to Drupal … the amount of time this page takes to load under traffic

  • http://twitter.com/jmproffitt jmproffitt

    How dare you kick over the open source software development hornet’s nest! Heh.

    Totally agree with your assessment. I admit that Drupal can be a superior framework for technically complex sites. But for writing and publishing on the web, WordPress is the current champ. Even huge sites with multiple writers and editors like GigaOm and AllThingsD are powered by WordPress (just to name 2). Those particular sites are managed on the WordPress.com infrastructure and have special tweaks just for them, but the core remains the same.

    Drupal is best suited to sites [1] with a lot of time and money to burn on technical staff or contractors, and [2] a collection of mutually-exclusive content objectives that need to be met and managed through a single platform for business reasons.  Outside of that, Drupal is a painful choice.

  • http://sibsystems.com Ben

    I think that you’re right. It sounds like Drupal has some issues right now when it comes coding and development community. I have used both and very much prefer WordPress and that is primarily because of the development community behind it. We made some video tutorials on how to get started with WordPress at http://wpthink.com if anyone needs to make the switch.

  • Anonymous

    Your article would make more sense if it were titled “9 reasons for journalists to switch from Drupal to WordPress for their blog”.  There is never one tool that works for everything.  Rather, it is always a matter of finding the right tool for the job.  If you are a Journalist making a single-author website to post stories, WordPress is likely the right tool.  Many Drupal users would have told you that at the outset, saving you a lot of effort.  But if you are a software developer who needs to build a multi-function website with customized content types that manages the workflow of dozens of contributors and editors and interfaces with external, enterprise-wide applications, WordPress can’t do half of that.

    Rather than saying you know the right tool for everyone, you should remind people to look for the right tool for their particular needs. 

    Unless of course, you main objective was to drive people to your your website.  In which case, creating an article with the keywords “Drupal” and “WordPress” and the phrase “9 reasons to switch” and embedding prominent links to your website is pure brilliance.  I’m sure you’ll get thousands of hits!