How writers can navigate the boundaries between fact & fiction

I am just back from the Mayborn conference in Texas, where I delivered a manifesto of sorts and drew a strict line between the standards of fiction and nonfiction. My so-called “Vow of Chastity” lists 10 points of contention that have generated a lot of discussion.

So what is going on here? I’ve just published a list of fairly conservative standards and practices for nonfiction, and now I want to host a live chat on how we can cross the boundaries between fact and fiction? As Sarah Palin might say, “You betcha!”

Fiction and nonfiction share a border. The name of that border is “Storytelling.” In this week’s writing chat , we talked about the strategies and standards that govern all good storytelling, and explored how to use them responsibly and creatively.

You can replay the chat here:

We have made it easy to comment on posts, however we require civility and encourage full names to that end (first initial, last name is OK). Please read our guidelines here before commenting.

  • http://www.facebook.com/daily.chinhthuc Daily Chinhthuc
  • Anonymous

    I just came across this quote that seems to fit the topic:

    “It’s a feature of our age that if you write a work of fiction, everyone assumes that the people and events in it are disguised biography — but if you write your biography, it’s equally assumed you’re lying your head off.” Margaret Atwood – On Writing Poetry (1995)

  • Anonymous

    I just came across this quote that seems to fit the topic:

    “It’s a feature of our age that if you write a work of fiction, everyone assumes that the people and events in it are disguised biography — but if you write your biography, it’s equally assumed you’re lying your head off.” Margaret Atwood – On Writing Poetry (1995)