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New Yorker cover artist says resemblance to August cartoon is unintentional

The New Yorker’s new cover is a beautiful, understated take on the unrest in Ferguson this past week.
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It also bears a strong resemblance to an Aug. 21 editorial cartoon by R.J. Matson. (courtesy Cagle)
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Bob Staake, who illustrated the New Yorker cover, writes on Facebook that he hadn’t before seen Matson’s cartoon.

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Daryl Cagle, who publishes the Cagle cartoons syndicate, told Poynter in an email that many New Yorker political covers follow in the footsteps of editorial cartoonists: “It would be more unusual if a New Yorker cover hadn’t been drawn by a political cartoonist first,” he wrote.

Staake also told The New Yorker’s Mina Kaneko and Francoise Mouly he used to live in St. Louis and “At first glance, one might see a representation of the Gateway Arch as split and divided, but my hope is that the events in Ferguson will provide a bridge and an opportunity for the city, and also for the country, to learn and come together.” Read more

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Lessons learned: TV-newspaper partner on investigative project

Dallas TV station KXAS (NBC5) and the Dallas Morning News teamed up to investigate complaints of harassment by hundreds of soldiers at the Army’s Warrior Transition Units (WTU’s) that were designed to help the injured heal. In the process of documenting the poor treatment of Army veterans these separate media outlets learned about how to work together.

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The story 
The project, called “Injured Heroes, Broken Promises,” took more than six months of work, relied on hundreds of pages of government records and interviews with dozens of injured veterans who said they had been “ridiculed, harassed and threatened by the commanders of Army units created to help injured soldiers heal.

Three of the nation’s 25 WTU’s’s are in Texas. The units are supposed to manage the care and treatment of wounded, ill or injured soldiers, whether they are physically or mentally injured, or both. 64,000 soldiers have used the treatment programs since 2007. Read more

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Fergus Bell leaves AP for startup that helps newsrooms verify content

Fergus Bell, who helped the Associated Press develop standards for verifying user-generated content, will become the head of newsroom partnerships and innovation at Social Asset Management Inc. SAM sells software to newsrooms that helps them build verification of UGC into their workflows.

“Moving to a startup was something that was pretty difficult, but I think it was a natural extension of the work I’ve been doing,” Bell said in a phone call. He’s SAM’s first employee with a news background and will visit newsrooms considering its product, as well as help his coworkers figure out what newsrooms need.

Bell will remain in London. He said SAM’s small size (he’ll be its sixth employee) was a major enticement to move from AP, where he was international social media and UGC editor — “I’m really excited to be a part of a team where an idea can come up in the morning and be executed in the afternoon,” he said. Read more

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Jian Ghomeshi charged with sexual assault

Toronto Police Service | Toronto Star

Police in Toronto have charged former CBC radio host Jian Ghomeshi with four sexual assault counts and one of “Overcome Resistance – Choking.” He surrendered to police and is scheduled to appear in court Wednesday, the police say.

Ghomeshi withdrew a planned suit against the CBC Tuesday. The broadcaster fired him last month after it saw “graphic evidence” that he’d injured a woman in what he described as consensual rough sex.

Other women came forward with allegations against Ghomeshi, including the actor Lucy DeCoutere. Read more

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BUTTERBALL TURKEY FOR THANKSGIVING DINNER

Here’s why food editors don’t mess with Thanksgiving (but some would like to)

You can always call the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, which is still a thing, at 1-800-BUTTERBALL.  (PRNewsFoto/Butterball Turkey Company)

You can always call the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line(TM) at 1-800-BUTTERBALL. (PRNewsFoto/Butterball Turkey Company)

It was around the Jewish High Holy Days, actually, when Sheryl Julian learned not to mess with people’s recipes. The menu was pretty much the same for the Jewish community in Boston, Julian said, who were then largely Ashkenazi.

“One year I found a Sephardic Jewish woman raised in north Africa and she gave me this wonderful menu,” said Julian, food editor for The Boston Globe.

About a month later, a woman stopped Julian after she gave a talk “and she said, ‘I have a bone to pick with you. What where you doing printing that recipe on the High Holy Day? That’s not what the Jews in Boston make.’”

Yes, Julian replied, but wasn’t it interesting?

“And she said, ‘it was different and i wasn’t interested.’”

Don’t you have your own recipes? Julian asked the woman.

“And she said, ‘of course i do, I just want to read everyone else’s.’”

Julian realized something just then. Read more

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3 early food editors who did a lot more than share recipes

For about 10 years, Kimberly Voss has studied women’s pages. The newspaper sections that predated lifestyles sections started in the 1880s and have largely been dismissed as fluff.

They covered fashion and food, she found, “but they also had really important hard news,” said Voss, an associate professor at the Nicholson School of Communication at the University of Central Florida. Voss found stories on equal rights, equal pay, and she knew there were more.

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Her book, “The Food Section: Newspaper Women and the Culinary Community,” came out in April and in it, Voss tells the stories of women she got to know well who did way more than just share recipes in their sections.

“These were journalists who were doing important things that went well beyond the perceived fluff of their sections.”

I asked her to choose three favorites.

Jeanne Voltz, food editor, The Miami Herald, 1950s, The Los Angeles Times, 1960s:

Jeanne Voltz, photo courtesy Kim Voss.

Jeanne Voltz, photo courtesy Kim Voss.

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News orgs want to help fix Ferguson

Good morning. Here are eight media stories. (No newsletter tomorrow or Friday — happy Thanksgiving, and see you Monday.)

  1. News orgs seek your ideas on Ferguson

    #FergusonNext is a project from the opinion shops at The Guardian, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Ebony.com, Colorlines, The St. Louis American and Riverfront Times. (#FergusonNext) | Darren Wilson spoke with George Stephanopoulos. (ABC News) | Freelance reporters Emily Molli and Marcus DiPaola got robbed in Ferguson. (Riverfront Times) | Post-Dispatch employees covering Ferguson: Sorry, no Thanksgiving break for you. (Poynter) | Post-Dispatch front: "Smoldering"

  2. Why do people react so strongly to CNN?

    Ferguson protesters in New York last night chanted "Fuck CNN." The network showed the chants. "Hats off to CNN for showing as much of the chanting as they did," Erik Wemple writes. "But they may want to consider why it is that people seem to react so strongly to this news provider." (WP) | Maybe it's Don Lemon?

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NYT corrects: Thanksgiving dishes article ‘contained numerous errors’

No, it’s not backing down on #grapegate. But The New York Times found numerous other issues with its Nov. 18 “The United States of Thanksgiving” feature:

An article last Wednesday recommending a Thanksgiving dish from each state, with a recipe, contained numerous errors.

The recipe from Connecticut, for quince with cipollini onions and bacon, omitted directions for preparing the quince. It should be peeled, cored and cut into 1-inch chunks. An illustration with the West Virginia recipe, for pawpaw pudding, depicted a papaya — not a pawpaw, which is correctly depicted above. The introduction to the recipe from Arizona, for cranberry sauce and chiles, misstated the origin of Hatch chiles. They are grown in New Mexico, not in Arizona.

The introduction to the Delaware recipe, for du Pont turkey with truffled zucchini stuffing, referred incorrectly to several historical points about the Winterthur estate. It was an ancestral home of the du Pont family, not the sole one; it was established in 1837, not in 1810; the house was completed in 1839, not in 1837.

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P-It's an Honor

Today in Media History: Jimmy Breslin’s 1963 JFK column: ‘It’s an Honor’

On November 26, 1963, The New York Herald Tribune published “It’s an Honor,” one of the most memorable newspaper columns of all time.

Jimmy Breslin tells the story of President John Kennedy’s funeral from the perspective of Clifton Pollard, a gravedigger at Arlington National Cemetery.

This is how Breslin’s story begins:

“Clifton Pollard was pretty sure he was going to be working on Sunday, so when he woke up at 9 a.m., in his three-room apartment on Corcoran Street, he put on khaki overalls before going into the kitchen for breakfast. His wife, Hettie, made bacon and eggs for him. Pollard was in the middle of eating them when he received the phone call he had been expecting. It was from Mazo Kawalchik, who is the foreman of the gravediggers at Arlington National Cemetery, which is where Pollard works for a living. ‘Polly, could you please be here by eleven o’clock this morning?’ Kawalchik asked.

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Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014

No Thanksgiving holiday for St. Louis Post-Dispatch journalists who cover Ferguson

Some journalists at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch won’t be able to take Thanksgiving off, Post-Dispatch Editor Gilbert Bailon tells Poynter.

“Only those who are directly involved in covering the Ferguson story,” Bailon writes in an email. Affected journalists work in the metro, business, photo and design and production pods. “That includes editors,” Bailon writes. “A few people already are on vacation. Features and Sports are unaffected.”

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Judge orders Connecticut publication to hold story

Connecticut Law Tribune

Stephen Frazzini, a judge in New Britain, Connecticut’s Superior Court, has forbidden Connecticut Law Tribune to publish an article, Thomas B. Scheffey reports. The article, by Isaac Avilucea, concerns a document published, apparently by mistake, on the Connecticut Judicial Branch’s website.

The Law Tribune says the order is unconstitutional prior restraint, and has filed a motion asking it be lifted. The publication’s lawyer, Daniel Klau, tells Scheffey “I am actually under a restraining order about what I can tell my own client” and that “in a child protection case on the juvenile court docket, the court granted a party’s request for an injunction barring the Connecticut Law Tribune from publishing information that it lawfully obtained about the case.”

Earlier this month a judge in Fulton County, Georgia, lifted an order that forbade news outlets from publishing a story about a school-cheating case, realizing it was made in “error.”

Avilucea, who has turned up in Poynter stories before (1, 2) said in a phone call that Monday was his last day at the Law Tribune: He’s headed to The Trentonian. Read more

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Fox News reporter talks about getting camera busted in Ferguson

Fox News reporter Steve Harrigan was covering the unrest Monday night in Ferguson, Missouri, when someone in the crowd busted his photographer’s camera.

“When we got there initally we were surrounded by eight or 10 young men calling me Darren Wilson,” Harrigan said by phone. But then glass broke on a nearby store, and that “distracted people,” Harrigan said.

Harrigan in Ferguson.

Harrigan in Ferguson.

He tried to show some of the goods getting looted when a smaller group — maybe four or five people — set upon him and camera operator Dutch Wargo. “I think there was some unhappiness we were showing looting,” Harrigan said.

One person shouted “Fuck Fox!” Another smashed the camera to the ground, disabling it. Harrigan and Wargo broadcast from iPhones while Wargo got his backup camera operating.

Steve Harrigan, who is normally based in Miami, has been in Ferguson for 11 days and also covered Ferguson in August. Read more

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How David Beard plans to promote PRI.org’s ‘journalistic city states’

David Beard’s first task as executive editor of PRI.org will be to promote the public media organization’s “journalistic city states,” he said in an interview.

That won’t be a small task. PRI is a Minnesota-based digital media company perhaps best known for “The World,” a show put together in Boston. Its newsroom operates out of WGBH, a PBS affiliate. It has partnerships with “Frontline,” “Nova,” GlobalPost and Global Voices. Beard will be its first executive editor.

Beard told Poynter his primary goal is to grow PRI’s reach by making potential audience members aware of the “treasures” the company has to offer, including Radio Ambulante host Daniel Alarcón, “Studio 360″ and “The Takeaway with John Hockenberry”.

“I think its audience, like so much of journalism, is just a tiny fraction in the universe of people who want to see and hear it,” Beard said. “My job will be to make that a bigger fraction.”

Over the summer, PRI’s website attracted an average of 1 million unique visitors, compared to 390,000 over the same period the previous year, said Michael Skoler, general manager of PRI. Read more

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NYT urges staffers to avoid holiday clichés

The New York Times

Via New York Times standards editor Phil Corbett, Mark Bulik reminded staffers Tuesday to cut the holiday clichés:

As yuletide clichés go, “Christmas came early for so-and-so” is nearly a match for “’tis the season.” We’ve done a fairly good job of avoiding the latter. But it seems that every year, Santa checks his list in advance and brings an early Christmas present to someone via The New York Times. A few ghosts of clichés past:

Bulik lists phrases to avoid, including “early Christmas present,” “Christmas came early,” “’tis the season,” “all the trimmings,” and “the white stuff”.

Last week, NPR standards editor Mark Memmot warned NPR staffers against using a few holiday standards, including:

  • “Twas the night before…”
  • “Over the river and through the woods …”
  • “Bah, humbug.”

If you’re looking to eliminate all traces of Christmas from your vocabulary, The Baltimore Sun’s John McIntyre has a good list of clichés to avoid here. Read more

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How the Southern press foiled FBI’s attempt to smear MLK

Is it possible that we have to thank the white Southern press of the 1960s – even the segregationist press – for its restraint in resisting FBI attempts to smear the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., with sexual scandal?

That question is raised, but not sufficiently developed, in a Nov. 11 New York Times piece written by Yale historian Beverly Gage. She discovered in the files of FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover an uncensored draft of what has been called the “suicide letter.”  The letter was part of an elaborate effort to discredit King, who was about to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Based on wire taps and audio tapes, the one-page letter, supposedly sent by an outraged black citizen, described in the vivid language of the day examples of King’s marital infidelities and sexual adventures.  The writer, actually an FBI agent, threatened to go public in 34 days with details of King’s affairs.  Read more

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