Filloux: Economic value lies in original journalism, not live tweeting or blogging

Monday Note
Frederic Filloux continues his exchange with Jeff Jarvis over the importance of articles vs. live news coverage such as tweeting and blogging. It started with Jarvis’ post a few weeks ago suggesting that articles are sometimes unnecessary byproducts of the journalism process. In Filloux’s latest post, he writes, “As great as they are from a user standpoint, live blogging / tweeting, crowdsourcing and hosting ‘experts’ blogs bring very little money – if any, to the news organization that operates them.” True economic value, he writes, comes from works of original journalism. Moreover, Filloux contends that “process journalism” can encourage mediocrity: “It’s one thing to acknowledge live reporting or covering developing stories bear the risk of factual errors. But it is another to defend inaccuracies as a journalistic genre.” || Related: The news article is breaking up.

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  • http://www.mactonweb.com web development bangalore

    The surprise to me at Mission Loc@l is that when community meeting stories are well done and give the reader a sense that they are actually experiencing the meeting.

  • http://www.thepomoblog.com Terry Heaton

    What really bothers me about this is the assumption that real time and articles are mutually exclusive. Dead wrong.

  • Lydia Chavez

    I couldn’t agree more with Filloux. The surprise to me at Mission Loc@l is that when community meeting stories are well done and give the reader a sense that they are actually experiencing the meeting – albeit in a shorter form than having to sit through the entire ordeal – readers appear to enjoy the back and forth.  Heather Smith, a reporter here, has changed the way I teach meeting coverage.  Here’s an example from a meeting last fall. http://missionlocal.org/2010/09/notes-from-the-dolores-park-meeting-fix-the-park-without-changing-anything/ . You could argue that this is indulgently hyperlocal, but if it engages readers enough in the process, then so be it. Best, Lydia Chavez, editor, Mission Loc@l:disqus