To be sure, blog highlighting unnecessary journalism phrases is absolutely necessary

Unnecessary Journalism Phrases
Freelance writer Josh Sternberg has introduced a new Tumblr, “Unnecessary Journalism Phrases,” a very unique blog that is in the process of calling out the filler phrases in news stories. For all intents and purposes, it’s a stylebook on what not to write. It might possibly be absolutely necessary to writers who are in serious danger of sprinkling meaningless phrases throughout their stories, often because they are not in close proximity to an editor. With examples of the phrases that, to be sure, add little to news stories, each visit to the blog is like a little writing training session that was held on Tumblr. For what it’s worth, it was indeed difficult to include in this post every unnecessary phrase that exists on the blog. At the end of the day, I must ask the question: Moving forward, what unnecessary phrase is next?

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  • http://twitter.com/beatp patricia Marvin

    I say, you must read this now.

  • Anonymous

    Wonderful and indeed truly necessary! I’ve collected a group of crutch phrases news organizations (both print and broadcast) use that irritate the heck out of me. Let’s start with “The Times has learned… ” No kidding. If someone working for the newspaper hadn’t learned about a story, you wouldn’t be reporting it, would you? The definition of “breaking news” has gotten far more elastic than it used to be. I have way too much work to do to get started on this or the discussion could go on for hours. Clean up your act – you’re SUPPOSED to be communications professionals.

  • Anonymous

    Wonderful and indeed truly necessary! I’ve collected a group of crutch phrases news organizations (both print and broadcast) use that irritate the heck out of me. Let’s start with “The Times has learned… ” No kidding. If someone working for the newspaper hadn’t learned about a story, you wouldn’t be reporting it, would you? The definition of “breaking news” has gotten far more elastic than it used to be. I have way too much work to do to get started on this or the discussion could go on for hours. Clean up your act – you’re SUPPOSED to be communications professionals.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ehandler Elisabeth Handler

    The post provides useful advice, not just for journos, but for those whose job depends on not pissing off journos with our bad writing… To spot “filler” phrases, look for all forms of the verb “to be.” Also, scrutinize use of the word “there.”

  • Anonymous

    Bravo.

  • http://billbennett.co.nz billbennett

    I was wondering how far down the list “moving forward” would be… :-)

  • http://twitter.com/jkavanagh Jerry Kavanagh

    I mean, it goes without saying that this is an incredible piece that sets a new standard, and also is valuable as well.

  • http://twitter.com/pwthornton Patrick Thornton

    This is great. I also give you an A for how you wrote this post. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1149827316 Kevin Meerschaert

    My favorite is “police continue to investigate”

  • http://www.facebook.com/johntheeditor John Cooper

    That “remains to be seen.”