Did Steve Jobs salutes turn snarky too soon?

The New York Times
Tributes to Steve Jobs were published immediately upon news of his October death. Those salutes turned snarky within 18 hours, says Alex Williams. “There was a time when the gloves stayed put after the death of a legend,” Williams writes. “But the velocity with which Steve the Saint stories morphed into Steve the Sinner stories was striking, said Kurt Andersen, the novelist and former New York magazine editor. ‘It’s the speed of the news cycle writ large, in terms of legacy and existential worth,’ he said.” Walter Isaacson, whose biography was fodder for some praise and criticism of Apple’s founder, says it wasn’t fair to Jobs or his book to cherry pick the “Bad Steve” stories. “The way the book turns out, he developed a very loyal team who was very inspired by him, and he has a very loving family … In the end, you have to judge him on the outcome.’ “

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  • http://profiles.google.com/wenalway Robert Knilands

    No point. Flagged.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=504633504 Dan Mitchell

    You seem to think the world is packed with nothing but idiots who don’t understand things that you understand. Or anyway, that’s one thing I just learned. You realize that, since you have a somewhat unusual name, it’s easy to find your Internet history, right? 

    Your hobby is trolling message boards to insult people and create conflicts out of the most bizarre issues, based on bizarre reasoning and misplaced emotion. You’ve been banned more than once for this reason. Even when you’re right – as with the problem of style over substance in journalism – you alienate everybody you address and your arguments make no sense. Based on what I’ve just seen, I’m going to leave you alone now because clearly there’s more going on here than I can, or care to, deal with. 

  • http://profiles.google.com/wenalway Robert Knilands

    Dan, I’m being mildly facetious. But there were at least two articles — the one from Time and another one I’ll have to relocate — that played up the calligraphy class angle far beyond its relative importance. I assume the writers didn’t understand the development of the Apple line before the iPod and didn’t bother to research much.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=504633504 Dan Mitchell

    That’s true – if people seriously think that taking a calligraphy class was the best thing Jobs ever did, that would be bad. Do they? Who?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=504633504 Dan Mitchell

    That’s true – if people seriously think that taking a calligraphy class was the best thing Jobs ever did, that would be bad. Do they? Who?

  • http://profiles.google.com/wenalway Robert Knilands

    Some of the early tributes were factless offerings to the design altar. Time magazine’s article was by far the worst, with very little information about much before the iPod. If people seriously think the best thing Jobs ever did was to take a calligraphy course because it led to the creation of some fonts, then those people shouldn’t be writing anywhere, much less for a national magazine.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_W74C3QUBK4ISXYP3JPFLAKXZCI Dan W

    He was a genius at getting people to buy overpriced gadgets that were obsolete within a year.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_W74C3QUBK4ISXYP3JPFLAKXZCI Dan W

    He was a genius at getting people to buy overpriced gadgets that were obsolete within a year.

  • Anonymous

    Seems like the salutes to Steve Jobs turned snarky about twenty-seven years ago. Was that too soon?

  • http://bepnhahang.com Kitchen
  • http://twitter.com/AdamChew1 Adam C

    There will always be admirers and haters.

  • Anonymous

    I think the reactions were somewhat natural in that the first obits put Jobs somewhere between Jesus and Edison, probably closer to the former. He’s a monumental figure in technology development and marketing that has changed what we buy and how we experience music, words, and pictures. But he invented nothing. He inspired people to invent for him. He made choices of what inventions to pursue and which to discard and was almost always prescient in those choices.  That is a great and wonderful thing. But the early obits were hagiography. The pendulum likely swung back too far in response.

  • Anonymous

    A lot of the early tributes tended toward hagiography and the cult-like behavior that surrounds a certain subset of Apple users. One can be respectful and recognize the visionary product developer versus the rather flawed life of the man.