The New York Times tops list of most-engaged news orgs on Google+

Adam Sherk
An analysis of news organizations on Google+ finds that The New York Times has the most engaged audience there, with an average of about 248 “+1s,” reshares or comments per post. Following were technology news sites Mashable and The Next Web, aided by the social network’s early adoption among technology enthusiasts. Here is the top 10 out of 45 ranked by Adam Sherk:

Google+ Page Total +1s, shares
& comments per post
1. The New York Times 247.8
2. Mashable 144.6
3. The Next Web 112.4
4. NPR 78.4
5. Breaking News 70.4
6. TIME 68.5
7. NBC News 62.8
8. The Atlantic 59.9
9. The Wall Street Journal 58.8
10. TechCrunch 53.9

Earlier: Public streaming, recording make Google Hangouts more useful for journalists (Poynter) | How to set up a virtual writers’ hangout in Google+ (Poynter) || Related: Create a Google+ business page

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  • Anonymous

    This is really amazing thanks for sharing this
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  • http://www.adamsherk.com/ Adam Sherk

    I agree, it does tell two sides of the overall story.

  • Anonymous

    I think both statistics are interesting, Adam. The average tells me who’s getting the most engagement per post, which presumably would stay constant if they increased their volume. The totals tell me who’s most active AND engaged on Google+.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks Cory. I see Adam has added a second chart to his post using overall engagement instead of averages, and I encourage people to reference that as well. I think both metrics are valid in different ways — it’s interesting to know who gets the most impact per post, as well as who’s generating the most total activity.

  • http://www.adamsherk.com/ Adam Sherk

    I responded to Cory on my original post but thought I’d do so here as well.

    I opted not to look at the total figures because I felt it created more of an arms race comparison.
    Having more total user actions just because a page has more updates didn’t seem that insightful. I thought it was more interesting to look at the averages per post, to even things out a bit and make a more fair comparison. But Cory is right that a page with very few updates will skew those figures too.

    So I’ll try to make time to go back and create a second chart with the total figures for each site.

  • http://www.breakingnews.com/ CoryBe

    Hey Jeff, great to see our +Breaking News at #5, but defining “Google+ engagement” as the amount of activity PER POST is missing the big picture.  Using this methodology, we’re penalized for posting frequently.  If you add up our comments, shares and +1s, we have more engagement than several others above the #5 ranking.  As I suggested to Adam in a comment, it would be great to combine total with per post to come up with a better measure here.

  • http://www.breakingnews.com/ CoryBe

    Hey Jeff, great to see our +Breaking News at #5, but defining “Google+ engagement” as the amount of activity PER POST is missing the big picture.  Using this methodology, we’re penalized for posting frequently.  If you add up our comments, shares and +1s, we have more engagement than several others above the #5 ranking.  As I suggested to Adam in a comment, it would be great to combine total with per post to come up with a better measure here.