Journalists became ‘disillusioned’ working for struggling Spanish-language papers

The Huffington Post
Several Spanish-language weekly newspapers in California have folded in recent years due to both economic and political reasons, says Eduardo Stanley. He quotes journalists who say the English-language daily papers that owned these Spanish-language weeklies were out of touch. “Those who established these newspapers saw it only as business,” Miguel Baez, former editor of Noticiero Semanal, told Stanley. “It’s hard to put a face on a project like that if your only interest is money. If you don’t believe in the project, how are you going to promote it?”

Stanley said many of the Spanish-language papers weren’t generating enough advertising revenue, despite efforts to charge advertisers extra for a “combo” newspaper package in Spanish and English. The 2010 State of the Spanish Language Media report found that advertising in Spanish-language publications dropped from $103 million in 2008 to $77 million in 2009. || Related: Ken Doctor says “We’re witnessing the death and life of California news.”

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  • Mary Tillotson

    Amusing:  the people who paid for these businesses thought of them as…businesses! 

  • Mary Tillotson

    Amusing:  the people who paid for these businesses thought of them as…businesses! 

  • Anonymous

    So when did Latinos suddenly begin clamoring for newspapers to read?  I live in a census tract that’s 92% Latino, in Central Texas, and there are no bookstores, newsstands or newspaper racks.  The only people on my street who subscribe to the local daily are white; we had a Spanish-language daily a few years ago, Rumbo , but it went belly-up.  I think this trend of daily newspapers trying to develop a Latino audience is a fantasy:  Latinos don’t read.

  • Anonymous

    So when did Latinos suddenly begin clamoring for newspapers to read?  I live in a census tract that’s 92% Latino, in Central Texas, and there are no bookstores, newsstands or newspaper racks.  The only people on my street who subscribe to the local daily are white; we had a Spanish-language daily a few years ago, Rumbo , but it went belly-up.  I think this trend of daily newspapers trying to develop a Latino audience is a fantasy:  Latinos don’t read.

  • Anonymous

    So when did Latinos suddenly begin clamoring for newspapers to read?  I live in a census tract that’s 92% Latino, in Central Texas, and there are no bookstores, newsstands or newspaper racks.  The only people on my street who subscribe to the local daily are white; we had a Spanish-language daily a few years ago, Rumbo , but it went belly-up.  I think this trend of daily newspapers trying to develop a Latino audience is a fantasy:  Latinos don’t read.