Departure of Disney exec sparks Twitter spat over crediting scoops

Reuters’ Peter Lauria complained today that his company wasn’t credited with breaking news that Rich Ross was stepping down as head of The Disney Co.’s movie studio. Do seconds divide the best and the rest? Are we obligated to note when someone beats us on a story? Do you “own” a scoop, and if so, for how long?

My Storify of this important debate follows. Please give it the attention it deserves, unless someone has beaten me by 30 seconds with his version.

Related: I tweeted this story before you even saw it! | Debate inspires Jay Rosen to classify the four types of scoops | False Paterno death reports highlight journalists’ hunger for glory

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  • http://twitter.com/benknight8 ben knight

    Only the pointless Poynter would spend the slightest bit of energy on this ridiculousness. 

  • Anonymous

    This entire fiasco is exhibit 1A why the mainstream media is losing its relevancy and continue to fade away. There was no news to break - an exec at a public company sent a memo to the entire workforce. You know who broke the story? Rich Ross.

  • Anonymous

    I can relate to Brian Stelter’s point of view, but I think it’s a little unfair. Don’t we always argue for breaking news on Twitter by saying that it doesn’t matter *where* you break it as long as you do? By that logic, being the first to publish a wire story makes you the one who broke the news. I work at a wire service too and we have the same rules: Wire comes first.

  • http://twitter.com/ProducerMatthew Matthew Keys

    From a news consumer’s point of view: “Scoops” and “firsts” don’t matter. The info does.

    From a journalist’s point of view: It sucks when you work hard on a story and another news org scoops you (whether intentional or not, whether you work at Reuters, the New York Times or Politico)

  • ShankyS

    Really? Like we don;t have some slightly bigger issues to worry about. Steve, you must have a whole bunch of time on your hands to be writing about this worthless crud.