Neil Armstrong, dead at 82, graced front pages after moon landing

Neil Armstrong took America to the moon on July 20, 1969 when the astronaut landed there in Apollo 11 with “Buzz” Aldrin and famously declared “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” Roger Ailes describes the historic communication from space:

“I was in the Oval Office when Neil Armstrong landed on the moon because I was called in to coordinate the coverage,” Ailes recalls. “I got to thinking, We have a feed from the moon. We’ve got a feed from the Earth. I can set up the first interplanetary shot in history.”

NBC, which broke the story, initially misidentified Neil Armstrong online. NBC said the mistake was online for seven minutes. There is now a correction on the story. (Screenshot by TVWeek).

The split screen solution made broadcast history. The following day, the moon landing rose on the country’s front pages and again on the 40th anniversary in 2009. A selection of those pages appears below (some cropped), along with Sunday’s front pages honoring Armstrong, who died Saturday at the age of 82. || Related: In TV coverage, his death was like his life: strangely muted” (AP) | The best design decisions & worst mistakes on Armstrong front pages (Charles Apple) | People tweet memories of moon landing (Sarah Stokely/Neal Mann) | Photos to use (and avoid) for Sunday front pages featuring Neil Armstrong (Charles Apple) | Nixon speechwriter William Safire had a eulogy prepared in 1969, in case of a space disaster (via Jim Roberts) || Correction: This post originally stated that Michael Collins, who was also on the Apollo 11 mission, landed on the moon. He did not. Collins remained in orbit.

This image appears courtesy of Wikipedia
Front page appears courtesy of The New York Times
The Boston Globe published select pages showing its coverage of the moon landing
The Denver Post tweeted a photo of its moon landing front page
The Huntsville News
The front page of the Omaha World-Herald had an unusual headline: “First Men Set Foot on Alien World after Soaring U.S. Eagle Roosts At ‘Tranquility Base’ on the Moon.” Thanks to Megan O’Connor for the photo.
The Evening Standard appears courtesy of the BBC
The Guardian appears courtesy of the BBC
The Financial Times appears courtesy of the BBC
The Times of London appears courtesy of the BBC
Neil Armstrong’s hometown paper, The Wapakoneta (Ohio) Daily News, ran this front page when he returned to Earth (via Steve Silberman, via Nina Diamond)
The Daily Times, in Texas, from the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum.
The Brownsville (Texas) Herald, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
The Tyler Morning Telegraph, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
The Salt Lake Tribune, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
The Huntsville Times, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
California’s Ventura County Star, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
New York’s Post-Standard, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
Pennsylvania’s Beaver County Times, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
North Carolina’s Gaston Gazette, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
am New York, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
Hawaii’s Star-Bulletin, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
The News & Messenger, in Virginia, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
Trib p.m., in Pennsylvania, on the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, appears courtesy of the Newseum
Virginia’s News Advance appears courtesy of the Newseum
The Kentucky Enquirer appears courtesy of the Newseum
Portugal’s Publico appears courtesy of the Newseum
The Forum, in North Dakota, appears courtesy of the Newseum
The Chicago Sun-Times appears courtesy of the Newseum
Austria’s Neue appears courtesy of the Newseum
Indiana’s Journal & Courier appears courtesy of the Newseum
North Dakota’s Bismarck Tribune appears courtesy of the Newseum
California’s Record appears courtesy of the Newseum
Brazi’s Correio appears courtesy of the Newseum
Italy’s Il Giornale di Vicenza appears courtesy of the Newseum
Minnesota’s Duluth News Tribune appears courtesy of the Newseum
Illinois’ Journal Star appears courtesy of the Newseum

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=749911534 Anonymous

    Since the death of Neil Armstrong on Saturday, many remembrances have told the story about his famously flubbed first words on the moon. From Ian Crouch on The New Yorker’s News Desk blog:
    via LANGAUGE LOG Ben Zimmer posts:
    When the lunar module, named the Eagle, touched down, following moments of radio silence that terrified the folks back in mission control, he relayed: “Houston: Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.” Later, as he made his way out of the lunar module (or LM), he described his progress in banal terms that, because of where they were coming from and what they conveyed, rose to the level of magic: “I’m going to step off the LM now.” And then he issued what is among the most famous proclamations of the last century—a jubilant counterbalance to F.D.R.’s “Day of Infamy” speech and a capstone to J.F.K.’s declaration that “we choose to go to the moon”—a statement that Armstrong had composed and prepared just hours earlier, in between the more pressing business of operating space equipment, according to Armstrong’s biographer, James Hansen: “That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind.”

    In the wake of Armstrong’s death, there may be some discrepancy in how the phrase will be rendered, just as in the ensuing years, there has been controversy as to what exactly Armstrong said as he lighted out from the ladder, becoming the first member of mankind to stand on a celestial body other than earth. It’s been good fodder for years to note that the famous quotation, beamed to a significant fraction of the world’s population in real time, is just a bit off. “Man” and “mankind” are synonymous in Armstrong’s formulation, since he’s missing the modifier “a” in front of “man” to draw the distinction. Armstrong would later claim that he said the “a,” and that it got lost, as it were, in transmission. (Linguists and scientists have argued both sides.) Regardless, he said that he preferred to see it written with the “a” in parenthesis, a wish that, both while he was living and now that he is gone, it only seems fair to honor.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=749911534 Anonymous

    Since the death of Neil Armstrong on Saturday, many remembrances have told the story about his famously flubbed first words on the moon. From Ian Crouch on The New Yorker’s News Desk blog:
    via LANGAUGE LOG Ben Zimmer posts:
    When the lunar module, named the Eagle, touched down, following moments of radio silence that terrified the folks back in mission control, he relayed: “Houston: Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.” Later, as he made his way out of the lunar module (or LM), he described his progress in banal terms that, because of where they were coming from and what they conveyed, rose to the level of magic: “I’m going to step off the LM now.” And then he issued what is among the most famous proclamations of the last century—a jubilant counterbalance to F.D.R.’s “Day of Infamy” speech and a capstone to J.F.K.’s declaration that “we choose to go to the moon”—a statement that Armstrong had composed and prepared just hours earlier, in between the more pressing business of operating space equipment, according to Armstrong’s biographer, James Hansen: “That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind.”

    In the wake of Armstrong’s death, there may be some discrepancy in how the phrase will be rendered, just as in the ensuing years, there has been controversy as to what exactly Armstrong said as he lighted out from the ladder, becoming the first member of mankind to stand on a celestial body other than earth. It’s been good fodder for years to note that the famous quotation, beamed to a significant fraction of the world’s population in real time, is just a bit off. “Man” and “mankind” are synonymous in Armstrong’s formulation, since he’s missing the modifier “a” in front of “man” to draw the distinction. Armstrong would later claim that he said the “a,” and that it got lost, as it were, in transmission. (Linguists and scientists have argued both sides.) Regardless, he said that he preferred to see it written with the “a” in parenthesis, a wish that, both while he was living and now that he is gone, it only seems fair to honor.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=749911534 Anonymous

    The local news coverage in the Chinese-language newspapers in Taiwan was similar with front page photos and stories. In all 5 major national dailies. BUT the local national TV stations, one in particular, ETTV, did a segment about his death (and life) BUT also added the BS conspiracy theories that the moon landing never happened, complete with archival footage of the conspiracy beliefs, showing Taiwanese viwers taht the USA flag could not move in the wind as it did in video and therefore the moon landing was faked. And THIS is what many Taiwanese believe. SIGH

  • Anonymous

    This is a historical passing, but looking at all these covers reminds me how monumentally unfair the coverage was focusing so much on Neil and all but forgetting about Buzz and Collins. So Neil won (or lost) the coin toss to be the first one to set foot on the surface? They all did the work and they all deserved equal or something closer to equal coverage.

  • http://www.poynter.org Poynter

    I remember it, too. I believe the NYT front page that appears in our Kennedy book has a mention of Chappaquiddick, but I’m not sure what edition we used. I’ll update when I can get my hands on a copy of that book. –Julie Moos, Director of Poynter Online

  • http://www.poynter.org Poynter

    I remember it, too. I believe the NYT front page that appears in our Kennedy book has a mention of Chappaquiddick, but I’m not sure what edition we used. I’ll update when I can get my hands on a copy of that book. –Julie Moos, Director of Poynter Online

  • http://www.poynter.org Poynter

    I remember it, too. I believe the NYT front page that appears in our Kennedy book has a mention of Chappaquiddick, but I’m not sure what edition we used. I’ll update when I can get my hands on a copy of that book. –Julie Moos, Director of Poynter Online

  • http://twitter.com/dodgemedlin Mark Dodge Medlin

    I thought sure I’d seen an NYT front page from that day that had a tiny notice about Chappaquiddick at the bottom. Was that a different edition, or am I remembering it wrong?

  • Guest

    wow