School shooting front pages show the power of a single word, a name

Saturday’s front pages capture the nation’s horror after 26 people were killed by a gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn. Though many newspapers used quotes and partial phrases, some of the most powerful pages relied on the power of a single word.

Sunday’s front pages listed the names of the dead: 20 children at the school, all ages 6 and 7; 6 adults at the school, and the shooter’s mother at her home. There has been a quiet movement since the Aurora, Colorado theater shooting to minimize mentions of a killer’s name and remember the victims. These front pages underline that intention.

That roll call continued in some Monday papers, which also highlighted the speech given by President Obama at an interfaith service in Newtown on Sunday night.

All newspapers appear courtesy of the Newseum (a few have been cropped).

Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.

And the power of two words

Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.

Naming the dead

Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.

Monday front pages

Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.
Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.

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  • Rog9

    I don’t like how some of the front pages single out one victim – no doubt the child they consider most angelic looking. Disrespectful to the facts, and the memory of the others.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Brian-OConnor/586193714 Brian O’Connor

    “overwhelmed?” underwhelming.

    How about ditch the gimmicks and play it straight.

  • sargeh

    The media was at its worst with the intrusive photos they chose to splash across the pages. And they left questions. The papers that used the photo of the horrified woman never did tell the reader the condition of her sister. The photo should have been withheld until they could do so.

  • http://www.facebook.com/robert.knilands Robert Knilands

    Except that newspapers have been using the single-word treatment on almost a daily basis for years. They have painted themselves into a corner with the “Giant photo, giant headline” approach, so really all we have here is “gianter photo, gianter headline.”

    As always, judging coverage on dollar-sized pages is a pretty weak way to evaluate. But I’m sure there are plenty of people trying to do this today.

  • http://twitter.com/ItIsHighItIsFar Diamond Joe

    The Morning Call one can lose the smiling Santa on the top.