Time magazine publishes one of its longest pieces

Time magazine’s new issue features “the longest single piece ever published by a single writer” in the magazine, according to a press release: Steven Brill’s 36-page behemoth story about the American system of healthcare.



The story is available free to non-subscribers.

Bloomberg Businessweek’s cover takes on the American system of housing: Susan Berfield (with Amanda J. Crawford and Peter Coy) looks at a developing housing boom, which sort of looks like the last housing boom.

The Atlantic’s March issue shows off its redesign (note the capital “T” in “The,” which used to be lowercase), overseen by Creative Director Darhil Crooks. Crooks “created a new Poseidon colophon (a logo that is an image of Poseidon) to use between sections, which he modeled after recurring images he found in the magazine’s archives, Emma Bazilian writes in Adweek.

“I was looking for something as a marker in the timeline of the Atlantic, something that would signify that it was a new Atlantic,” he said. “I thought the best way to do that was to bring something from the past and carry it into the future.”

Courtesy The Atlantic, here is Poseidon 2013:

In a release, the magazine says it will have “three sections at the core of the magazine”:

Dispatches: Ideas and provocations from The Atlantic’s roster of writers and contributors. Among the recurring features in this section, including several visually inspired editorial elements:
Wordplay: A monthly exploration of our living language
By Design: A full-bleed photograph that showcases an inspired invention
Sketch: A profile of an intriguing public figure or celebrity
Chartist: A complex idea or problem broken down into a revealing set of charts, graphs, and illustrations
Study of Studies: A meta-analysis of research studies that highlights some of the most informative and entertaining results, and how they complicate one another.
The Culture File: The Atlantic’s signature culture coverage—book reviews, film and pop-culture criticism, food, drink, travel, and more—expands and moves toward the front of the book.
The Feature “Well”: The rich, deeply reported journalism that most distinguishes The Atlantic.

The “Wordplay” column will be written by Atlantic Wire writer Jen Doll, Bazilian notes. “We’ve been lucky to work with a lot of great freelancers over the years, but part of this process was looking around and realizing why aren’t we actually using our flagship magazine to show off what our existing, awesome staff is capable of,” Atlantic Editor James Bennet told Bazilian.

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