John Temple: Journalists shouldn’t ‘measure our success in wealth’

John S. Knight Fellowships

In a video interview published Tuesday, John Temple spoke with Knight Fellowships Director Jim Bettinger at a recent event at Stanford University. Temple, who spent a year as managing editor of The Washington Post and was the founding editor of Honolulu Civil Beat, is currently a senior fellow at Stanford. Bettinger asked what journalists should learn, and what they should not learn, from Silicon Valley. Here’s some of what Temple said, with the full video below.

Should learn

“…A great sense of openness and optimism and the sense of possibility and a willingness to try and to learn by trying and by doing and a willingness to experiment.”

Should not learn

“Technology does not solve all problems.”

“People sometimes tend to chase the next big thing in Silicon Valley, and journalism I think is deeper than that, and we have to be careful that it’s not about fads. It’s about a much deeper service to people than the next big thing.”

“I think we in journalism have to be really careful not to measure our success by wealth, but by impact and by contributing to our communities and by making the world a better place with journalism, and there’s all kinds of journalism that can do it, but it’s not about the money, even though we know that a fundamental issue for us is to support and pay for the journalism that we as a society need.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story cited the John S. Knight Foundation. That was incorrect, it’s the John S. Knight Fellowships.

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  • Venktesh tirumala

    Wealth should not be the way of Journalist success rather how eagerly folks wait to listen you is! A journalist can be wealthy in a day if he fixes interview of any giant or so BUT a true journalist is always unbiased similar to https://tyger.ac