Chick-fil-A has a ‘folksy new food journalism site ‘

Mother Jones

Chick-fil-A has a new food journalism site, Kiera Butler reported Thursday for Mother Jones. It’s called “Let’s Gather.”

Some articles featured on the site currently include “Supernatural Superfoods,” “Our Year Without Groceries” and a lot of buzzing bees.

Yes really. Check out the actual site, which is now hosting the project’s second issue. Push past the animated bees buzzing around scenically, and don’t get so distracted by this homey idyll that you forget to click on the shabby chic nav tool in the upper right.

Once you do, you might venture over to the about page, which says this: “By exploring the winsome themes found in the everyday blend of our meals, hobbies, and relationships, each issue inspires readers to try a new recipe, think a new thought, and join a new conversation. Ultimately, these are stories that remind us of the joy we experience when we make time to do life together.” (Emphasis added.)

In 2012, Chick-fil-A CEO Dan Cathy made lots of news for opposing gay marriage. In March, Clare O’Connor reported for Forbes that the company’s CEO still has the same beliefs.

Cathy himself hasn’t changed his own views on same-sex marriage. As he told the AJC:

“I think the time of truths and principles are captured and codified in God’s word and I’m just personally committed to that,” he said. “I know others feel very different from that and I respect their opinion and I hope that they would be respectful of mine.”

What is clear is that his family’s fried chicken business, which made $4.6 billion in sales in 2012, will be staying out of the fray when it comes to equality.

“I think that’s a political debate that’s going to rage on,” he told the Journal-Sentinel. “And the wiser thing for us to do is to stay focused on customer service.”

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  • lunarcamelco

    Why would Mother Jones encourage readers to check out a site run by a proudly homophobic company? Is the idea that anything and everything that appears in print on the subject matter of food journalism is of interest? Even on the slowest summer news day that makes no sense to me.