NYT’s Tyler Hicks on Gaza: ‘It’s impossible to know who’s who’

The New York Times | CNN | Time

On Tuesday, The New York Times’ photojournalist Tyler Hicks spoke with James Estrin for the Times’ Lens blog. Hicks and Estrin spoke about the images coming out of Gaza.

Sometimes people assume that you can have access to everything, that you can see everything. But the fighters are virtually invisible to us. What we do as photographers is document what we can to show that side of the war. There are funerals, there are people being rushed to the hospital, but you can’t differentiate the fighters from the civilians. They are not wearing uniforms. If there is someone coming into the hospital injured, you can’t tell if that’s just a shopkeeper or if this is someone who just fired a rocket towards Israel. It’s impossible to know who’s who. We tried to cover this as objectively as possible.

On Sunday, CNN’s Brian Stelter spoke with New York magazine’s Benjamin Wallace-Wells about how differently Israel and Hamas are handling the war.

“The images right now, I think, are driving this much more than the text,” Wallace-Wells told Stelter. “This is a story where the image imbalance is just incredibly strong, simply because Israeli citizens are not being successfully killed in the same way that Palestinians are.”

Stelter ended the segment with a question to CNN’s Tony Maddox, executive vice president and managing director of CNN International, about why Hamas militants aren’t shown regularly. Maddox’s reply:

“Our infield reporters have repeatedly said that Hamas militants are rarely to be found on the streets of Gaza. We have had no intimidation from Hamas, and received no threats regarding our reporting. They have so far refused all requests for interviews in Gaza.”

On July 30, Time’s LightBox shared Andrew Katz and Olivier Laurent’s story “Inside Gaza and Israel: Two Photographers, One War,” about Oliver Weiken with the European Pressphoto Agency and Andrew Burton with Getty Images. Weiken covered the war from Gaza. Burton covered it from Israel.

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